Re: Comments on collared doves and vagrants

Nick Lethaby
 

Just to clarify Roseate Spoonbills don't occur in Baja California. I imagine
the nearest regular populations would be in southern Sonora on the other
side of the Gulf of California.

-----Original Message-----
From: Florence Sanchez [mailto:sanchez@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 08, 2001 4:16 PM
To: Cleo Ardoin
Cc: sbcobirding@...
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Re: Comments on collared doves and vagrants


I'll stay out of most of this one, but as to the Roseate Spoonbills on the
Santa
Barbara County list, they occured in two different years in the 1970's and
at
slightly different locations. Both sightings were in late summer, and the
birds
were juveniles. The consensus at the time, which I believe has not been
disputed,
is that these birds were post-breeding vagrants from Baja California, not
escapees.
I'm sorry that I don't have Paul's book at hand to verify dates--it's still
in
storage along with most of our other books!

Florence Sanchez


Cleo Ardoin wrote:

I agree with the posted comments questioning why we do not include
Eurasian
Collared Doves in the county records. In the San Luis Obispo Big Year
listing, they do not even have it on their list of county birds, so the
ones
I have been seeing at Oceano Campground will not be counted. If
starlings,
House Sparrows, and other introduced species, can be counted and included
in
the records, (Ring-necked Pheasants where I grew up), Chukars,
Great-tailed
Grackles, and so forth, (and "ABA approved" for inclusion on our
lifelists)
why not the collared doves and others like the Nutmeg Mannekins on
Patterson
Creek? The Greater Flamingo in Morro Bay back in 1985 is on the record
book
as an escapee, so what about the Roseate Spoonbill on the Santa Barbara
County checklist?

Also, regarding vagrants that just end up dying, at the Morro Bay Winter
Bird Festival, Kenn Kaufman said that most of the vagrants that wind up in
California usually continue west and perish over the Pacific Ocean. While
this is a disturbing and disheartening bit of information, it does make me
wonder about all those birds listed on county checklists that are not the
real county birds (like collared doves are becoming) but merely
accidentals
that as a result of their inclusion on a checklist actually distorts the
true picture of what birds can be found in our county. Although it makes
for big numbers and surely exotic species like Wood Stork and Roseate
Spoonbill makes for news, what would the list look like if it was more
representational of what occurs in Santa Barbara County?

Something to think about! Corrine Ardoin
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