Date   

Re: Tanager on SBMNH property

Peter Gaede
 

Not seen as of 11:15 this morning. The only birds of note were a GH owl along the creek and a female MacGillivray's warbler in the poison oak tangles down from the museum water feature on the north side of the trail.

Peter Gaede
SB

On Aug 29, 2012, at 7:10 PM, Rebecca Coulter wrote:

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization. What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform. I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara


Northern Waterthrush continues

Rob Denholtz
 

Carpinteria Creek, Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012, 9:00 AM

The NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH, first spotted by Eric Culbertson a few days ago, continues on Carp Creek. Geoff Stearns and I spotted it, foraging along the east bank of the creek, about 50 yards south of 6th St. A very nicely-marked fresh bird. Also found a couple of WILLOW FLYCATCHERS at approximately the same location. There is a rough path along the creek, but watch out for uneven ground, drop-offs hidden by long grass, and an abundance of poison oak.

We also heard an unfamiliar song: sort of a slow, brief, low-pitched Western screech owl kind of sound, but surely not that bird. Any thoughts?

Rob Denholtz
Carp


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Nick Lethaby
 

Dave:

The reports have been consistent that the bird has a dark bill so I am inclined to think it may well be a Hepatic. I am checking again right now.

Nick

----- Original Message -----
From: Florence Sanchez [mailto:sanchezucsb11@yahoo.com]
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 10:42 AM
To: Dave Compton <davcompton@verizon.net>; Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Dear Dave,

I wondered about the possibility that it is a Summer Tanager, but the dark color of the bill (and length) seems to rule that our.  However, EASTERN Summer Tanager is slightly different from the Western race and I did check field guides when I got home to see if that is a possibility and perhaps it is.  That is why I have called it "Tanager" not Hepatic Tanager in my posts.  As you saw, neither we nor Rebecca could pick up the gray face patch that should be present in Hepatic Tanager.  Hope more folks see thiss bird and that someone gets a photo.  Unfortunately, I'm tied to home this morning so can't recheck.

Florence


________________________________
From: Dave Compton <davcompton@verizon.net>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 8:08 AM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning


 
Interesting sounding bird. I hope to see it myself. The plumage Rebecca describes sounds a lot like a bird that was initially called a Hepatic Tanager in Montana de Oro about ten years ago, but which eventually was agreed to be a Summer Tanager.

Note that this would be VERY early for a Hepatic Tanager to occur on our coast. The long returning wintering bird from Santa Barbara in the 80s-90s never was found earlier than 23 October. I've seen Summer Tanagers in coastal SB County in pretty much every month of the year. So a Hepatic Tanager in August would have to be pretty convincingly documented.
 
Dave


________________________________
From: Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@gmail.com>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization.  What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform.  I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara

On Aug 29, 2012, at 11:06 AM, Florence Sanchez wrote:

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning.  I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago.  That bird was described as redder than we could discern.  The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek.  (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit.  Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail.  We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting.  The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark.  We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it.  The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com/
. Yahoo! Groups Links

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com
. Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Wes Fritz
 

Hi all,

Just to add to Dave's notes, this sighting could possibly the earliest fall sighting recorded in California. The earliest dates I could find are Sept. 5-13 from Orange County in 1973 and another transient record from Sept. 10-18 in 1988 from San Diego County.
Just to add to Dave's note, this would be extremely early with most of the records starting in late September and the majority arriving in October. So, if this mystery Tanager does get detected and the observer truly feels this is indeed a Hepatic Tanager please post immediately and if you can't, please call someone who can in a timely manner.

Thank you and good birding.

Wes Fritz
805-895-0685
wes-fritz@verizon.net
Solvang CA.

On Aug 30, 2012, at 8:08 AM, Dave Compton <davcompton@verizon.net> wrote:

Interesting sounding bird. I hope to see it myself. The plumage Rebecca describes sounds a lot like a bird that was initially called a Hepatic Tanager in Montana de Oro about ten years ago, but which eventually was agreed to be a Summer Tanager.

Note that this would be VERY early for a Hepatic Tanager to occur on our coast. The long returning wintering bird from Santa Barbara in the 80s-90s never was found earlier than 23 October. I've seen Summer Tanagers in coastal SB County in pretty much every month of the year. So a Hepatic Tanager in August would have to be pretty convincingly documented.

Dave


________________________________
From: Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@gmail.com>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization. What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform. I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara

On Aug 29, 2012, at 11:06 AM, Florence Sanchez wrote:

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning. I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago. That bird was described as redder than we could discern. The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek. (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit. Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail. We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting. The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark. We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it. The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com/
. Yahoo! Groups Links

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Coronado Nashvilles

Florence Sanchez
 

To refresh anyone's memory who needs to know, we had our first Ruby-crowned Kinglet of fall in our yard on Sunday, August 19.  Not sure if this is the earliest date for our yard, but it might be; however, they are usually the first of our wintering species to return or pass through.  I'm not sure if the first ones we see are those that actually stay.  I continued to see a Kinglet here for a couple of days after the Aug. 19 observation but haven't noticed one so far this week.

Florence Sanchez



________________________________
From: Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@gmail.com>
To: SBCo Birding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 8:26 AM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Coronado Nashvilles


 
To add to Hugh's Coronado observations: Jean Brandt and friends birded
there last Monday and they had Orange-crowned Warblers, Yellow
Warblers, Wilson's Warblers, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Western Tanager,
Black-headed Grosbeak, and Hairy Woodpecker.

That's one very early Ruby-crowned Kinglet and on par with the
previous early record of 27 August 2005 in Carpinteria [Lehman2012].

- Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)

On Aug 29, 2012, at 6:17 PM, Hugh Ranson wrote:

There was a nice flock of warblers at the end of Coronado in
Ellwood this afternoon. It included 8 Wilson's, 5 Yellow, and 2
Nashville Warblers.

Hugh R.
SB




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Florence Sanchez
 

Dear Dave,

I wondered about the possibility that it is a Summer Tanager, but the dark color of the bill (and length) seems to rule that our.  However, EASTERN Summer Tanager is slightly different from the Western race and I did check field guides when I got home to see if that is a possibility and perhaps it is.  That is why I have called it "Tanager" not Hepatic Tanager in my posts.  As you saw, neither we nor Rebecca could pick up the gray face patch that should be present in Hepatic Tanager.  Hope more folks see thiss bird and that someone gets a photo.  Unfortunately, I'm tied to home this morning so can't recheck.

Florence


________________________________
From: Dave Compton <davcompton@verizon.net>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 8:08 AM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning


 
Interesting sounding bird. I hope to see it myself. The plumage Rebecca describes sounds a lot like a bird that was initially called a Hepatic Tanager in Montana de Oro about ten years ago, but which eventually was agreed to be a Summer Tanager.

Note that this would be VERY early for a Hepatic Tanager to occur on our coast. The long returning wintering bird from Santa Barbara in the 80s-90s never was found earlier than 23 October. I've seen Summer Tanagers in coastal SB County in pretty much every month of the year. So a Hepatic Tanager in August would have to be pretty convincingly documented.
 
Dave


________________________________
From: Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@gmail.com>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization.  What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform.  I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara

On Aug 29, 2012, at 11:06 AM, Florence Sanchez wrote:

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning.  I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago.  That bird was described as redder than we could discern.  The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek.  (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit.  Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail.  We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting.  The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark.  We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it.  The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez





------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com/
. Yahoo! Groups Links

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Coronado Nashvilles

Wim van Dam
 

To add to Hugh's Coronado observations: Jean Brandt and friends birded there last Monday and they had Orange-crowned Warblers, Yellow Warblers, Wilson's Warblers, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Western Tanager, Black-headed Grosbeak, and Hairy Woodpecker.

That's one very early Ruby-crowned Kinglet and on par with the previous early record of 27 August 2005 in Carpinteria [Lehman2012].

- Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)

On Aug 29, 2012, at 6:17 PM, Hugh Ranson wrote:

There was a nice flock of warblers at the end of Coronado in Ellwood this afternoon. It included 8 Wilson's, 5 Yellow, and 2 Nashville Warblers.

Hugh R.
SB


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Dave Compton <davcompton@...>
 

Interesting sounding bird. I hope to see it myself. The plumage Rebecca describes sounds a lot like a bird that was initially called a Hepatic Tanager in Montana de Oro about ten years ago, but which eventually was agreed to be a Summer Tanager.

Note that this would be VERY early for a Hepatic Tanager to occur on our coast. The long returning wintering bird from Santa Barbara in the 80s-90s never was found earlier than 23 October. I've seen Summer Tanagers in coastal SB County in pretty much every month of the year. So a Hepatic Tanager in August would have to be pretty convincingly documented.
 
Dave


________________________________
From: Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@gmail.com>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization.  What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform.  I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara

On Aug 29, 2012, at 11:06 AM, Florence Sanchez wrote:

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning.  I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago.  That bird was described as redder than we could discern.  The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek.  (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit.  Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail.  We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting.  The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark.  We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it.  The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com/
. Yahoo! Groups Links


N Waterthrush Carp Creek

Eric Culbs <ericculbs@...>
 

August 28, Carpinteria Creek 
Myself and a few other birders were able to find and view a Northern Waterthush late morning today and then again this evening in Carpinteria Creek. The bird was reliable for over an hour in the stretch of creek at 6ht street just above Lou Grant school (out front the condos) to just in front of the waste water treatment center. From my observations this may or may not be the same waterthrush that has been seen multiple times at this location over the last few days. I am new to waterthrush id, and so am just now learning what characteristics to focus on. The bird here is vocal. And after getting used to the call, you can easily follow it up or down the creek. If anyone takes photos please share. Thanks!

Eric Culbertson
Carpinteria

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Goleta Slough – Many Pelicans, Gulls, Heerman’s and an Osprey

Lynn Watson
 


Cuyama River Solitary Sandpiper

Peter Gaede
 

Hi All:

This evening there was a SOLITARY SANDPIPER along the river approximately 1 mile northeast of the USFS Pine Canyon Station along Hwy 166. I walked down to the riverbed where there was some standing water near a pull-out just past Mile Marker 26 (+35.0433°, -120.1829°), and flushed the bird a short distance to the north as I walked upstream.

Peter Gaede
Santa Barbara


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Florence Sanchez
 

I'm glad Rebecca found this bird.  her vantage point was better than ours as she got both a straight-on back view and a front view.  Our looks were all in profile or near profile, or in flight, so we never got the whole chest or whole back.  Her perception of the face color was the same as ours.  We also agree that the bill wasn't long enough for Summer Tanager, though it's stlil a heavy bill.  To me, it had a sort of "Roman nose" appearance in that the upper mandible is very thick near the nostril.

Florence Sanchez



________________________________
From: Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@gmail.com>
To: Sbcobirding <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 7:10 PM
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization.  What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform.  I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara

On Aug 29, 2012, at 11:06 AM, Florence Sanchez wrote:

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning.  I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago.  That bird was described as redder than we could discern.  The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek.  (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit.  Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail.  We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting.  The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark.  We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it.  The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com
. Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Rebecca Coulter
 

I did see the bird briefly around 10:30 but was unable to post until now. (Several birders tried to re-find it after 5PM but no joy.) In the same location that Florence and Tom had it, on the creek bank just west of the manhole cover in the trail, I saw it fly into a sycamore, landing about 15 feet off the ground. It sat very still, back facing me. No vocalization. What I observed was similar to Florence's description, though I also noticed reddish color on the uppertail coverts, a pale reddish wash on the breast when it briefly turned toward me, and some gray wash along the flanks. I also did not notice any gray in the cheek--it seemed to be more overall tan-olive about the face. The bill was dark, smaller than what I've observed in Summer Tanager. No mottled appearance on this bird--the overall body color was uniform. I sure would like a better look!

Rebecca Coulter
Santa Barbara

On Aug 29, 2012, at 11:06 AM, Florence Sanchez wrote:

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning. I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago. That bird was described as redder than we could discern. The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek. (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit. Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail. We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting. The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark. We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it. The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Coronado Nashvilles

Hugh Ranson <zonetail@...>
 

There was a nice flock of warblers at the end of Coronado in Ellwood this afternoon. It included 8 Wilson's, 5 Yellow, and 2 Nashville Warblers.

Hugh R.
SB


Willow Flycatcher on Ocean Meadows Golf Course today

Mark Holmgren <maholmgren@...>
 

Today Dave Harris and I completed 1 year of twice monthly surveys of the birds of OMGC.  I was surprised at how few returning migrants were there.  Are 53 Canada Geese a bit more than our summering population?  Soras returned by 9 August (4 were heard today), additional Virginia Rails (migrants or local offspring?) were also calling by 9 August.
The interesting bird today was a Willow Flycatcher (see map http://tinyurl.com/9me92je). We detected it by its interaction call, then it gave its 'whit' call, then it sang several times for us.  I don't think I've ever heard a fall Willow Flycatcher sing, much less for a prolonged period.The surprising thing is that the bird appeared to be in very fresh plumage. Some of the literature says that adult WiFls molt when they reach their wintering ground.  This adult, probably a male individual, had done at least a significant part of its molt in migration.  A direct link to the photos of this bird is:  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding/photos/album/652380432/pic/1805901201/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=21&count=20&dir=asc.

Mark Holmgren
Santa Barbara 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Nick Lethaby
 

What type of tree did you see it in?

-----Original Message-----
From: sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com [mailto:sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Florence Sanchez
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 11:07 AM
To: Sbcobirding
Subject: [sbcobirding] Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning.  I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago.  That bird was described as redder than we could discern.  The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek.  (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit.  Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail.  We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting.  The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark.  We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it.  The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez





------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com
. Yahoo! Groups Links


Migrant Push

Jamie Chavez
 

Having a couple of unexpected days off I have done a little birding this
week. While there is no huge wave of migrants yet or everyone would be
reporting it I have seen an obvious increase in activity in a couple of
Santa Maria parks. Yesterday in Waller Park I had a Wilson's Warbler and a
couple Yellow Warblers. For one hour this morning in Preisker Park in the
SW pines:

Wilson's Warbler- 1
Townsend's Warbler- 1 HY
Black-throated Gray Warbler- 1 fem
Yellow Warbler- 2
Western Tanager- 1
Pacific-slope Flycatcher- 1
White-breasted Nuthatch- 1 (not typical of the park)

On Monday 8/27 at SLC-2 on north VAFB in the two pines outside the office
trailer there was one each Yellow and Black-throated Gray Warbler.

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


Tanager on SBMNH property this morning

Florence Sanchez
 

Tom and I located an apparent Hepatic Tanager on the Museum of Natural History Property this morning.  I'm not sure if this is the same bird reported about a week ago.  That bird was described as redder than we could discern.  The location was downcreek of the Museum's "back yard" area near where there is a large manhole in the middle of the path that runs next to the creek.  (Also about 50-70 yards upcreek from the back entrance to the museum property.)

This bird was easy to observe in profile but it was hard to pick up the color because most of the time it was backlit.  Our impression was of a bird with an overall warm reddish tan color, darker wings and a reddish tail.  We could not pick up a definite cheek patch, but that was in part because of lighting.  The bill was unmistakeably heavy and dark.  We alerted Rebecca Coulter who was on duty at the Butterfly pavillion but hoped to get away to see if she could refind it.  The bird is moderately active but sits for several minutes at a time between forays.

Also present along the creek were a male Black-throated Gray Warbler, Female Yellow Warbler, Male Wilson's Warbler, and a calling Pacific Slope Flycatcher.

Florence and Tom Sanchez

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N. Waterthrush continues

Eric Culbs <ericculbs@...>
 

August 28, 4:15pm Carpinteria Creek
Got to Carpinteria Creek for 1/2 hour today and found the N. Waterthrush downstream of the 8th street bridge. I walked the dirt path on the north side of the creek from the 8th street bridge and ran into the waterthrush in the deep willow & brush in the creek after the first turn in the creek downstream of the 8th street bridge.

Eric Culbertson
Carpinteria


Andree Clark Bird Refuge - phalaropes

George Roland
 

There were 7 Red-necked Phalaropes at the Bird Refuge in Santa Barbara this morning about 9 am, easily seen from the viewing platforms. A Marsh Wren was chattering near the second platform west of the parking lot. The prone man lying in the center of the trail near the first platform was not dead, just dead drunk.

Bird on...George Roland, Montecito.

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