Date   
Devereux Slough shorebirds

Mark Holmgren <maholmgren@...>
 

At about 1pm today, viewed from these two points:http://tinyurl.com/mzcubxb:
6 Least Sandpipers
9 Western Sandpipers
2 Wilson's Phalarope
all these above were juveniles

7 or so Black-necked Stilts
1 Semipalmated Plover
several Killdeer
No Snowy Plovers


A minimum amount of water in the main channel of the slough only.

Mark Holmgren
Santa Barbara

new reddish egret SYRE

Don Tate
 

Weds 4 PM, on the island off the viewing platform. All blue-gray, head not shaggy or pinkish, vs the July bird.

Don Tate, Lompoc

Re.: Sage Sparrow Split

Ed Stonick <edstonick@...>
 

Hi birders!



Yes, they are nice photos, but. (maybe it's just me!) they all look pretty
much the same with no really obvious differences.



The colors, shades, lines in photos can vary so much. I think ID by
photograph is going to be very difficult and inconclusive. Song and
geography (breeding season) will be about the only way to know for sure.



Regards,

Ed



Ed Stonick

Pasadena, CA



From: sbcobirding@... [mailto:sbcobirding@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 5:55 AM
To: sbcobirding@...
Subject: [sbcobirding] Digest Number 4667

<mailto:sbcobirding-unsubscribe@...?subject=Unsubscribe> >

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Jamie Chavez
 

I thought why not ask Mr. Royse about the birds in his photos, so I sent a
message asking for details if he had any to offer. While I may not remember
many of the birds I've seen over the years, when I see one I've
photographed somewhere it often triggers my memory about that specific bird
or where I was when I photographed it. His reply may not clear up issues
related to ID but it is pasted below nonetheless.

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

------------------------------------


Hi,

I'll try to answer your questions.

I'm pretty sure that they're all identified correctly to the subspecies.
The canescens were taken in different lighting situations and are of 2
different individuals (the last photo being a different bird I think).
Those canescens were all taken in southern Kern County near Maricopa I
think it is (at the famous LeConte's Thrasher spot) and were all singing at
the time. The amount of black on the birds show them to be definitely
canescens and not nevadensis.

All the nominate belli were taken in the Otay Mountain Wilderness in San
Diego County.

The Sagebrush Sparrows were taken in New Mexico on their wintering grounds
at the Bosque del Apache NWR.

I took off exact locations from my website years ago because too many other
photographers started going to the areas I posted, some going as far as
publishing guides where to photograph birds. It especially became a problem
here in Ohio when I would find uncommon passerines on their breeding
grounds.

Bob Royse

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Nick Lethaby
 

I was surprised by the Sagebrush photos and the lack of streaking. Not very encouraging from an identification point of view.

From: Wes Fritz [mailto:wes-fritz@...]
Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 9:55 AM
To: Lethaby, Nick
Cc: Jamie Chavez; Sbcobirding
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Hi all,

I would think that photographing them on the breeding grounds would have validity to the sub-specie and would think that caution should be used in winter dispersing birds. I too am curious about the number of sample birds that were photographed. I also wonder about geographical cline in this complex of birds. The " Sagebrush" photo set seems to show a bird with slight streaking on the mantle and another with more unorganized streaking and yet one with little to almost no streaking on the back.
This was just a quick glance at the photos and I am looking forward to looking at them closer when I get a little time.

Good birding.

Wes Fritz
805-895-0685
wes-fritz@...<mailto:wes-fritz@...>
Solvang CA.
On Aug 13, 2013, at 7:46 AM, "Lethaby, Nick" <nlethaby@...<mailto:nlethaby@...>> wrote:


Jamie:

Since the canascens were taken in January how do we know these are not nevadensis? Also it would be good to know how many individuals are involved in the photo sequences.

Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: sbcobirding@...<mailto:sbcobirding%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:sbcobirding@...<mailto:sbcobirding%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Jamie Chavez
Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 6:35 AM
To: Sbcobirding
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

In the link Mike provided there is a series of photos by Robert Royse who probably just updated his photo site based on the new split. His photos of all three "Sage" Sparrows - Sagebrush, Bell's and intermediate Bell's canescens are among the best I've seen on the net in the past week or so because he has them all grouped together in one spot for comparison. This will show you the obvious and subtle differences between them. Here is the link to Mr. Royse's photos, just click the individual links to see the different types:

http://www.roysephotos.com/SageSparrow.html

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Michael D. Stiles <mstiles@...<mailto:mstiles%40calpoly.edu>>wrote:

**


Thanks Jamie for the write-up about the Sage Sparrow split. I came across
this today regarding vocalizations of the group:

http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040

The two species may be separable by song, but the subspecies nevadensis
and canescens are not only intermediate in plumage, but in song also.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Wes Fritz
 

Hi all,

I would think that photographing them on the breeding grounds would have validity to the sub-specie and would think that caution should be used in winter dispersing birds. I too am curious about the number of sample birds that were photographed. I also wonder about geographical cline in this complex of birds. The " Sagebrush" photo set seems to show a bird with slight streaking on the mantle and another with more unorganized streaking and yet one with little to almost no streaking on the back.
This was just a quick glance at the photos and I am looking forward to looking at them closer when I get a little time.

Good birding.

Wes Fritz
805-895-0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA.
On Aug 13, 2013, at 7:46 AM, "Lethaby, Nick" <nlethaby@...> wrote:

Jamie:

Since the canascens were taken in January how do we know these are not nevadensis? Also it would be good to know how many individuals are involved in the photo sequences.

Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: sbcobirding@... [mailto:sbcobirding@...] On Behalf Of Jamie Chavez
Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 6:35 AM
To: Sbcobirding
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

In the link Mike provided there is a series of photos by Robert Royse who probably just updated his photo site based on the new split. His photos of all three "Sage" Sparrows - Sagebrush, Bell's and intermediate Bell's canescens are among the best I've seen on the net in the past week or so because he has them all grouped together in one spot for comparison. This will show you the obvious and subtle differences between them. Here is the link to Mr. Royse's photos, just click the individual links to see the different types:

http://www.roysephotos.com/SageSparrow.html

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Michael D. Stiles <mstiles@...>wrote:

**


Thanks Jamie for the write-up about the Sage Sparrow split. I came across
this today regarding vocalizations of the group:

http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040

The two species may be separable by song, but the subspecies nevadensis
and canescens are not only intermediate in plumage, but in song also.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com Yahoo! Groups Links


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Dan Cooper
 

Nick -

I was thinking the same thing - and just labeling them "California" isn't particularly helpful (though I agree, they're terrific photos to show plumage variation). As we start taking (and reviewing) more photos of these birds, it wouldn't hurt to remind people to be as specific as possible about the location and date, not to mention behavior such as territoriality. All three subspecies may be occurring very close by at different times of year, with at least two overlapping at least some of the time. [Taking nearby Kern River Valley (Kern Co.) as an example, we might be dealing with breeding "coastal" Bell's up in foothill chamise chaparral north of Kernville (where not mapped as such by Cicero 2010, nor by Grinnell and Miller 1944), then "interior" Bell's breeding in Great Basin scrub (e.g., Artemisia tridentata) east of Lake Isabella, joined by wintering nevadensis/"Sagebrush Sparrow". Obviously we don't know how far northwest nevadansis gets (i.e., toward Ventura/SB County) on a regular basis, but a similar situation could be occurring in the north counties, with birds segregating out by habitat, depending on time of year.]

While I'm at it, at least the coastal Bell's, and maybe the others, seem to be very patchy in where they nest, with large areas of seemingly suitable habitat unoccupied. So as people explore the backcountry up north, noting abundance of the birds detected, and where "Sage Sparrows" *aren't* (maybe in ebird checklist notes for the day), would also be informative.

Dan Cooper
Ventura Co.

--- In sbcobirding@..., "Lethaby, Nick" <nlethaby@...> wrote:

Jamie:

Since the canascens were taken in January how do we know these are not nevadensis? Also it would be good to know how many individuals are involved in the photo sequences.

Nick



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Nick Lethaby
 

Jamie:

Since the canascens were taken in January how do we know these are not nevadensis? Also it would be good to know how many individuals are involved in the photo sequences.

Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: sbcobirding@... [mailto:sbcobirding@...] On Behalf Of Jamie Chavez
Sent: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 6:35 AM
To: Sbcobirding
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

In the link Mike provided there is a series of photos by Robert Royse who probably just updated his photo site based on the new split. His photos of all three "Sage" Sparrows - Sagebrush, Bell's and intermediate Bell's canescens are among the best I've seen on the net in the past week or so because he has them all grouped together in one spot for comparison. This will show you the obvious and subtle differences between them. Here is the link to Mr. Royse's photos, just click the individual links to see the different types:

http://www.roysephotos.com/SageSparrow.html

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Michael D. Stiles <mstiles@...>wrote:

**


Thanks Jamie for the write-up about the Sage Sparrow split. I came across
this today regarding vocalizations of the group:

http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040

The two species may be separable by song, but the subspecies nevadensis
and canescens are not only intermediate in plumage, but in song also.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

For everything birding in Santa Barbara County: http://www.sbcobirding.com Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Jamie Chavez
 

In the link Mike provided there is a series of photos by Robert Royse who
probably just updated his photo site based on the new split. His photos of
all three "Sage" Sparrows - Sagebrush, Bell's and intermediate Bell's
canescens are among the best I've seen on the net in the past week or so
because he has them all grouped together in one spot for comparison. This
will show you the obvious and subtle differences between them. Here is the
link to Mr. Royse's photos, just click the individual links to see the
different types:

http://www.roysephotos.com/SageSparrow.html

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

On Mon, Aug 12, 2013 at 9:52 AM, Michael D. Stiles <mstiles@...>wrote:

**


Thanks Jamie for the write-up about the Sage Sparrow split. I came across
this today regarding vocalizations of the group:

http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040

The two species may be separable by song, but the subspecies nevadensis
and canescens are not only intermediate in plumage, but in song also.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos

In Memoriam: Joy Parkinson

Florence Sanchez
 

(Thanks to Jamie Chavez for permission to post this announcement to the list.)

Joy Parkinson, long-time resident of Santa Barbara and enthusiastic birder and community activist, passed away Friday, August 9, 2013.  Joy was a founding member of Santa Barbara Audubon and served several terms as its president, most notably during the 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill.  For many years, she coordinated the Sierra Club's cruises to the Channel Islands on the Swift of Ipswich (pretty much all we had for regular pelagic cruises before the Condor and Condor Express).  She served on the Santa Barbara County Parks Commission and along with Charis Bratt and James Slater, was instrumental in getting Lake Los Carneros and the surrounding land dedicated as a county park for all to enjoy, rather than becoming a private housing development on the lake.  She was the first Director of the Coastal Information Resource Center and in that capacity organized a conference on the past and future of the Goleta Slough.  More recently, she served on the
Committee for the Future of Bishop Ranch, an area she and her long-time friend Jan Hamber had surveyed on many Santa Barbara Christmas counts.

Joy was most noted for her gift of friendship.  She loved to share her enthusiasm for birds and the natural world and was "mother Audubon" to many young birders in the county.  She continued her interest and support of Audubon throughout these last few months.  She was thrilled to be able to attend Audubon's 50th anniversary celebration this summer even though her health was declining.

In accordance with her wishes, her family plans no memorial services.  But when you are checking the trees around Stow House for vagrants or standing on the bridge at Lake Los Carneros watching for rails, please say "thanks, Joy."  It will be a fitting memorial tribute.

Florence Sanchez

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Mike Stiles
 

Thanks Jamie for the write-up about the Sage Sparrow split. I came across this today regarding vocalizations of the group:

http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3040

The two species may be separable by song, but the subspecies nevadensis and canescens are not only intermediate in plumage, but in song also.


Mike Stiles
Los Osos

10 Hermit Warblers, Figueroa Mountain

Peter Gaede
 

SB Birders—

I visited Pino Alto, the upper portion of the Davy Brown trail and the Ranger Peak area with Will Knowlton and Jeremy Pohlman today. Although no big surprises, Hermit Warblers were showing well. We had 7 at Pino Alto and 3 at Ranger Peak. Other warblers present included Wilson's (7); Townsend's (1); BT Gray (2); and Yellow (1).

There were also good numbers of Pygmy Nuthatches up top near Pino Alto, with several groups totaling 20-25 birds.

Peter Gaede
Santa Barbara

Re: County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Jamie Chavez
 

I've had a couple of replies saying the link to Kimball's message posted on
ID Frontiers didn't work. Rather than me trying get this linked correctly
his reply is pasted below. Sorry for the confusion.

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

-------------------
Jamie,

Your Santa Maria bird certainly looks like a good candidate for *Artemisiospiza
nevadensis* (Sagebrush Sparrow) the sharp and extensive dorsal streaking,
the relatively thin malar (with white mixed in with the black in the
anterior portion), and possibly the longer primary extension (hard to tell
from the photos, and maybe not reliable in the field) all support that ID.
Also, Im guessing that pale Sage Sparrows on the coast of California in
late fall and winter are far more likely to be highly migratory Sagebrush
Sparrows than *canescens* Bells Sparrows. Mojave desert *canescens* move
widely through the mountains of Los Angeles region after breeding (roughly,
May through summer), but I dont know of any evidence that they move over
the mountains onto the coastal lowlands.

In Los Angeles County the only coastal specimens of pale Sage Sparrows
are November birds from the San Fernando Valley (coastal lowlands) and San
Clemente Island; both of these measure out to *nevadensis*(and plumage is
also consistent with Sagebrush Sparrow). This despite the fact that *
canescens* is a common breeder on the desert slope of the county and
wanderers into the mountains (post-breeding) regularly. I would guess that
San Joaquin Valley *canescens* behave similarly, with limited post-breeding
dispersal but no long-distance movements to the coast.

Yes, the eBird data will be a mess until the next eBird taxonomic updates
and a lot of scrutiny of the existing data entered under the now
paraphyletic category of Interior Sage Sparrow (*canescens/nevadensis*).

I suspect that with the publication of the AOU checklist supplement in the
July *Auk* there will be lengthy discussions on this list serve of the
characters that separate *canescens *and *nevadensis* in the field. Its a
work in progress, and certainly wont be easy, given that measurements may
be the most reliable way to separate them (*nevadensis* being larger).

Kimball

Kimball L. Garrett
Ornithology Collections Manager
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
900 Exposition Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
213-763-3368
kgarrett@...
http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology

*From:* NBHC ID-FRONTIERS Frontiers of Field Identification [
mailto:BIRDWG01@... <BIRDWG01@...>] *On Behalf Of
*Jamie Chavez
*Sent:* Wednesday, June 26, 2013 7:03 AM
*To:* BIRDWG01@...
*Subject:* [BIRDWG01] Sage & Bell's Sparrow ID

With the pending split of Sage Sparrow I wondered if anyone had an opinion
as to the identity of a bird I photographed in October 2006 in coastal
Santa Barbara County, CA. Since this bird shows significant streaking on
the mantle and a weaker black moustachial stripe it is clearly not a
coastal Bell's Sparrow. However, It seems to me there will be potential for
confusion between the CA "interior" canescens, now to be lumped with belli
rather than nevadensis, and a true interior Great Basin Sage Sparrow which
shares similar physical traits. In particular, the amount of streaking on
the mantle. How reliable or variable is this for separating these two?

Archives: http://listserv.ksu.edu/archives/birdwg01.html

County Bird List Update & Sage Sparrow Difficulties

Jamie Chavez
 

All,

I have updated the county bird list at www.sbcobirding.com with the new
changes from the AOU (Birds link). These changes include the split of Sage
Sparrow into Bell's and Sagebrush Sparrows, and the new taxonomic order of
sandpipers and thrashers. By my count the total remains at 490 species.
Based on the CBRC database search White Ibis is still in circulation so
this bird is not included yet but will likely add another to the total
soon. Taking the conservative approach, Sagebrush Sparrow is not included
in my list but may be confirmed at some point based on a bird I've
highlighted below or others wintering in areas where Bell's Sparrow is
found in the eastern part of the county such as in Ballinger, Quatal and
Santa Barbara Canyons in the Cuyama Valley. Resident birds away from the
coast (A. b. canescens), although appearing different from Bell's but very
similar to Sagebrush, are now lumped with Bell's, therefore all resident
birds found in SBA are Bell's Sparrows. I always find splits and lumps
fascinating so I've looked deeper into this to try and understand the
differences. If you would like to read the proposal for splitting "Sage"
Sparrow with a discussion on distribution see this pdf file:
http://www.aou.org/committees/nacc/proposals/2013-A.pdf

I posted photos of a "Sage" Sparrow in Santa Maria in October 2006 found at
Jim May Park on my Flickr site (see:
http://www.flickr.com/search/?w=20709090@N00&q=Artemisiospiza ). This is
obviously not a Bell's Sparrow based on plumage (just Google Bell's Sparrow
for comparison), but maybe can be assigned to Sagebrush Sparrow. What is
troubling is if a bird like this can be seen well and photographed from
multiple angles showing all it's key features but still not be assigned to
Sagebrush Sparrow, can any be identified as such? If this bird or any in a
local collection represents a Sagebrush Sparrow then our county total can
be bumped to 491. I posted this question with a couple of photos to the ID
Frontiers listserve in June and Kimball Garrett replied with his
thoughts...
(see:
http://listserv.ksu.edu/web?A2=ind1306d&L=birdwg01&T=0&X=30D3305C8C763CF26A&Y=almiyi%40GMAIL.COM&P=165
)

There is very little current info on the net regarding separation of
Sagebrush Sparrow (A. nevedansis) from interior Bell's Sparrow (A.
canescens). It was always assumed or at least published that interior
California birds were related to Sagebrush Sparrow and much information
about these forms in print (Rising & Beadle), (Byers, Curson & Olsson),
lumped these birds with "Interior" Sage Sparrows of the Great Basin. Given
the new split/lump of these, separating Bell's from Sagebrush is not too
difficult except when trying to separate interior birds which may prove
very difficult. Canescens is typically described as "intermediate" but
compared to Sagebrush Sparrow it is, "slightly darker above with less
streaking, and has more prominent black malar stripe; in these characters
it tends towards the coastal group" (Byers, Curson & Olsson). Or, "smaller
and generally more richly colored than nevadensis. These cannot be safely
differentiated in the field..." (Rising, Beadle). Ouch. You can find
several photos of interior Bell's Sparrows from the Carrizo Plain in SLO
and elsewhere, and I located this site: (
http://www.greatbasinbirds.com/wordpress/sage-sparrows-of-long-valley-eastern-sierras/?show=slide
)
which shows Bell's Sparrows in Long Valley near the contact zone of
canescens and nevadensis near Owens Valley in E CA. No doubt some of this
will be worked out over time and birders should pay close attention to Sage
Sparrows in winter in the eastern part of the county or as a vagrant when
they turn up elsewhere in order to determine which birds might actually be
Sagebrush Sparrows. Good luck with that.

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

UCSB Beaches August 8

Florence Sanchez
 

I never got around to posting Thursday.

I walked the UCSB beaches and around the Lagoon Thursday morning from 7:30 to 9:00 on a low but incoming tide.  The marine layer was light, there was no wind, and the sea was calm.  In addition, I had the beach almost entirely to myself!  While there was a nice assortment of shorebirds, there was nothing remarkable and the numbers of any one species were not particularly large.  

The east-facing beach from the stairs to the end of campus continues to be heavily covered with kelp. There was a nice concentration of birds near the waterfall.  I had 7 Black-necked Stilts, 7 Greater Yellowlegs, 3 Semi-palmated Plovers and 2 Black-bellied Plovers at this location.

Elsewhere on the east-facing beaches, I had a total of 12 Stilts, 20 Greater Yellowlegs, 11 Whimbrels, 4 Long-billed Curlews, 12 Semi-palmated Plovers, 6 Willets, 1 Black Turnstone, 1 Least Sandpiper, and 1 Western Sandpiper.  The tern flock was not large, but contained Forester's, Elegant, 1 Caspian, and 4 Royal Terns.  One of the Royal Terns was a very young Juvenile--it barely had a crest.  There was also a resting tern that looked suspiciously like a Common Tern, but I could not get close enough to determine that without disturbing the whole flock.  The gull flock contained Western, Heerman's, California, and 1 adult Glaucous-winged Gull.  A fair number of Pelicans were resting on the beach with more flying by along with Brant's and Double-crested Cormorants.

Near Campus Point on the south-faing beaches, I had a flock of small shorebirds, including 6 Black Turnstones, 6 Least Sandpipers, and 12 Semi-palmated Plovers.  Then the beaches were pretty quiet until I reached the western outfall from the UCSB Lagoon.  There I had 22 Black-necked Stilts, 1 Greater Yellowlegs, 1 Willet, and 1 Whimbrel.

The UCSB Lagoon had no shorebirds except for a couple of Kildeer near the UCEN.  A raccoon was again fishing in the west end of the Lagoon.  Two Belted kingfishers foraged overhead.  There were several Black-crowned Night Herons in the vicinity and in the new wetland below San Nicolas Hall.  At least one Mute Swan remains in the Lagoon.

Florence Sanchez


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Warblers

terryluvsjan
 

It was interesting to watch a YELLOW WARBLER play 'catch the bug' with a WILSON'S WARBLER. They seemed to be traveling together, hunting along the creek that runs on our property on Arboleda Rd. And as we were watching our feeders, a LONG TAILED WEASEL came along and looked at us before continuing it's hunt.


Jan and Terry

Andree Clark Bird Refuge

C. Ryan
 

Birded the refuge today. I had 11 wilson's phalaropes and 1 red-necked phalarope. The red-necked had some tar on its undersides that seemed to be causing it some issues. There wasn't much else to note other than a calling sora, 2 eclipse wood ducks, 2 eared grebes in not so bright alternate plumage, and 2 green herons (1 juvenile).

Good Birding,

Casey Ryan
SB

Wilsons Phalaropes at Devereux

goletajeff
 

Hi All,
Cher H. and I had 5 Wilsons Phalaropes foraging in shallow water just north of the bridge. At least 2 were juv's.
Jeff Hanson
Goleta

Request for Volunteers: Goleta 4H

Jamie Chavez
 

All,

I received a message through the sbcobirding web site from a volunteer with
the Goleta 4H club asking for any willing birders to assist with a bird
study program. If you live in the area and are willing to lend your time
and talents please contact Lacie Harper at her email address below.

Thanks!

------------------------------

Hello, I am a project volunteer with the Goleta 4-H club serving kids 5-18
in Goleta and surrounding areas. I am leading a Nature Study group and we
will be studying birds in September. I was hoping to enlist some
knowledgeable birdwatchers who would be willing to volunteer a hour or two
to help us identify and learn about the local birds at Goleta Beach, Lake
Los Carneros, or Devereux. Can you please send an email out to your group
with my contact information for any interested persons? thank you!

lharper@...


-------------------------------

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

To Santa Barbara Island and back again, 2013-08-08

Wim van Dam
 

This Thursday, Jim Moore, Joel Barrett, Brad Sillasen, and myself enjoyed the Island Packers trip from Ventura, to Santa Cruz Island, to Santa Barbara Island, back to Santa Crus Island, back to Ventura for eight hours of unsupervised pelagic birding. The pelagic highlights were as follows (the first number refers to the stretch between Ventura and Santa Cruz Island, second number refers to the stretch between Santa Cruz Island and Santa Barbara Island).

Pink-footed Shearwater: 26 + 25
Sooty Shearwater: 325 + 35
Black-vented Shearwater: 50 + 0
Black Storm-Petrel: 0 + 100 (very conservative count)
Ashy Storm-Petrel: 0 + 25
Red-necked Phalarope: 20 + 10
Red Phalarope: 1 + 0
South Polar Skua: 0 + 2 (conveniently one in SBACO, the other one in VENCO)
Pomarine Jaeger: 1 + 0
Pigeon Guillemot: 3 at SCI, 3 at SBI

Thanks go to Joel Barrett for keeping track of which birds were seen where.

Wim van Dam
Solvang, CA