Date   

Barka Slough

John Deacon
 

All:

I had a nice morning at Barka Slough today.  49+ species recorded in a little over 3 hours.  Highlights, for me, were Blue Grosbeak, Yellow Breasted Chat, Lazuli Bunting, Black Headed Grosbeaks singing at almost every stop and Ash Throated Flycatchers.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44969306


John Deacon
iseekbirds@...


Devereux Slough area, minor notes

Thomas Turner
 

Due to a list subscription snafu, this didn’t go through yesterday. Luckily, non-urgent! See below if curious.

-Tom Turner



I walked the dune pond trail at COP this morning, with some UCSB students. Most notable were the many things we didn’t see, but a few things of minor note:

-One Greater Scaup continues to linger

-One Lazuli Bunting on the Pond Trail. This is the first one I have ever seen in the UCSB/Devereux area.

-A single Bonaparte’s Gull was in the Slough, and a handful of Caspian Terns

-A pair of White-throated Swifts were around; I very rarely see them in the UCSB/Devereux area

-We saw a pair of White-tailed Kites copulating

-The dune pond had lots of water but no birds of note

-The hummingbird diversity around campus has dropped; I have only seen Anna’s and Rufous/Allen for a week or so

Tom

Goleta


Palm Warbler at the Carpinteria Bluffs

John Callender
 

I had good views of a breeding-plumage Palm Warbler at the Carpinteria Bluffs this morning. The bird was in and around the row of large eucalyptus trees that run parallel to and just north of the railroad tracks (the "Artist's Passage" on Bluffs maps). I tried a couple of times to digiscope a photo, but the bird was too active for me to succeed. It was a large warbler with dark streaks on the sides, a rufous crown, and extensive yellow below, especially in the area of the throat, breast, and undertail coverts. It pumped its tail constantly.

The bird had a distinctive, soft chip note that allowed me to refind it a couple of times once I'd learned to recognize the sound. It worked its way all along the row of eucalyptus, at one point going a little ways into the north-south row of eucalyptus that runs next to the blueberry/flower fields at the west end of the Artist's Passage, at another point flying up from a coyote brush into a euc at the far east end of the Artist's Passage.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44963290

Eric Culbertson reminded me that Peter Gaede had a Palm Warbler here on January 5, 2018 for the Carpinteria Christmas Count; his photo of the (nonbreeding plumage) bird is here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S41662048

Eric wondered whether it's the same bird found by Peter, or if it's a wandering spring migrant instead.

John Callender
Carpinteria


Goleta, 4/26 am

Robert Lindsay
 

Thursday, 4/26, 8:30-10:30 am

Began at Lake Los Carneros which was quiet. Best birds were a Western Tanager in trees NE of the Stow house, and a very tame Sora at the east end of the Dam. Three species of Swallow (Tree, Cliff, Northern Rough-winged) were present. No Greater Scaup, no breeding Eared Grebe seen by me.

Goleta Sewage Treatment Plant was best spot of the day with the Fulvous Whistling-duck out on dry land. I was surprised by the size and fleshiness of the feet. The Wilson's Phalarope was swimming very close to the fence that marks the birding boundary in the south pond. Waters in both ponds included two pair of Blue-winged Teal and at least 10 Cinnamon Teal and numerous Gadwall. 

Finally, at Goleta Beach, several continuing Caspian Tern and a Clark's Grebe with several Western Grebe in the channel across from the restaurant. Three Red-throated Loon were also seen offshore. No Little Blue Heron, no Bonaparte's Gull. Still, they are probably around.

That's all,
Rob Lindsay


Phalarope follow up

Jake Broad
 

After examining my photos I changed my mind and think I saw a Wilson’s phalarope after all. I didn’t think it was a Wilson’s because it was so small, much smaller than others I’ve observed. If anyone is curious please find the link below. 


Jake
Goleta


Santa Monica Creek Hummingbirds

Eric Culbertson <ebc101@...>
 

All,

During a lunchtime visit to Santa Monica Creek today John Callender and I enjoyed an adult male CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD along with several Anna's, Rufous, Allen's and a single Black-chinned.The Calliope was south of the blooming cape honeysuckle often perching in the plum(?) tree across the creek or in the eucalyptus along the trail for extended looks. It fed occasionally in the bottlebrush and was also seen displaying/diving at an adult male Anna's! The long staying ORCHARD ORIOLE was also easily seen. Three raven high overhead going east were interesting.

Eric Culbertson 
Carpinteria 


Fulvous whistling duck & phalarope

Jake Broad
 

The fulvous whistling duck has moved to Goleta Sanitary District (unless it’s another one :) ) it’s currently on the deck between the lagoons. Very close to viewing range. There is also an unknown phalarope not a Wilson’s but I can’t ID. I did take photos of both birds that I’ll upload this evening. Currently 1443.

Jake
Goleta


Re: LLC Least Bittern

Jerry Rounds
 

A few minutes after you left, the bird flew from the little channel out across the water toward the culvert and then east, out of my sight.  A Blue Grosbeak was in the field about 100 yards to the east.

Jerry Rounds
Santa Ynez


Least Bittern

Dave Compton
 

Continuing in the same area as previously at Lake Los Carneros in Goleta, first spotted by John Callender at about 8:20. Interesting how years of drought have influenced occurrence of this species, as well as local birder interest when one actually shows up.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara


LLC Bittern

Adrian O'Loghlen
 

I saw the Bittern this evening (Tues) around 6:30 pm in the reeds on the island across (north) from the culvert to the east of the dam.  Managed to get a few grainy photos before it flew to the south side of the lake and disappeared into the reeds.

Least Bittern at LLC

Adrian O'Loghlen
Goleta


West Camino Cielo and Refugio Pass today.

Florence Sanchez
 

I drove to the top of Refugio Road today, then parked and walked East on W. Camino Cielo for a couple of mile.

Last year, the area at the top was pretty birdy, but not so much this year.  A singing Black-throated Gray Warbler was perhaps the most interesting bird.  Once one leaves the oak woodland, there is usually nothing but a few chaparral species, and that was certainly the case today.  No raptors except a couple of Turkey Vultures near the crest, but a flock of 4 White-throated Swifts was very active and fun to watch.

My quest was flowers, especially hoping to see some fire followers in the burn zone.  Before I got to that point, there was some nice stuff along the road (Bush Poppy and Chaparral Nightshade are particular nice up there right now) and more stuff just starting to come out (Pitcher Sage, Golden Yarrow, and Wooly Blue Curls).  In the shady roadcuts in the oak woodland, I found several Fairy Lanterns, which was nice since I found none along Alisal Road last week,  Also some unusually late early-blooming annuals such as Shooting Stars and Milkmaids.

Finally in the burn zone (just about all of it below the road--I didn't go as far to where both sides of the road were burned), I found a swath of Zygadene Lilies, making a nice show under the bare, burned-out stumps of shrubs.  Clif SMith's book says they can occur in good numbers after a fire in the Santa Ynez Mountains, and I checked them carefully to be sure I had not found the similar Soap Plant instead.  At the top of the slope was the lushest stand of Wild Hyacinth I have ever seen.  Then in a grassy swale, I had some nice annuals:  Chia Sage, large-flowered Phacelia (a common fire-follower),  Caespitose and California Poppies, and a couple of other things I could not identify.  Further on, the shrubs were starting to stump sprout and there was plenty of grass in some spots, but no more annuals.

When the hills are bare, it is startling to observe just how steep out hillsides are.  No wonder fires are so hard to fight.

Florence Sanchez


Re: LLC Least Bittern

Wim van Dam
 

After which I spent another hour between 1 and 2pm with the same 0 result. 

Wim van Dam
Solvang, CA


On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 17:16 Bradley Hacker via Groups.Io <bradley_r_hacker=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Glenn K, John C and I looked another 70 min after that to no avail. 


Good birding,


On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 17:04, Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...> wrote:

All,

This doesn't seem to have got out on this list but around 10 AM, Jeff Hanson and David Levashaff refound the Least Bittern at LLC. They got the message out on the group me list. I shot over only to find it had disappeared. We were literally about to give up about 10 minutes when it reshowed well for about 10 minutes, perched in the open on the tules.

It showed at the same spot both time. Go to the E end of the dam and look across the lake roughly NNE. Just above the tules, the trees include a lone slender euc. The bird was in the tules just to the left of this tree. A scope is helpful to get good looks, but it is easily identifiable through binoculars.

It was cool and overcast this morning. My guess is that this bird is most likely to show at dawn and dusk.

Nick Lethaby

Goleta

--

Sent from a phone


Re: LLC Least Bittern

Bradley Hacker <bradley_r_hacker@...>
 

Glenn K, John C and I looked another 70 min after that to no avail. 


Good birding,


On Tuesday, April 24, 2018, 17:04, Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...> wrote:

All,

This doesn't seem to have got out on this list but around 10 AM, Jeff Hanson and David Levashaff refound the Least Bittern at LLC. They got the message out on the group me list. I shot over only to find it had disappeared. We were literally about to give up about 10 minutes when it reshowed well for about 10 minutes, perched in the open on the tules.

It showed at the same spot both time. Go to the E end of the dam and look across the lake roughly NNE. Just above the tules, the trees include a lone slender euc. The bird was in the tules just to the left of this tree. A scope is helpful to get good looks, but it is easily identifiable through binoculars.

It was cool and overcast this morning. My guess is that this bird is most likely to show at dawn and dusk.

Nick Lethaby

Goleta


LLC Least Bittern

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

This doesn't seem to have got out on this list but around 10 AM, Jeff Hanson and David Levashaff refound the Least Bittern at LLC. They got the message out on the group me list. I shot over only to find it had disappeared. We were literally about to give up about 10 minutes when it reshowed well for about 10 minutes, perched in the open on the tules.

It showed at the same spot both time. Go to the E end of the dam and look across the lake roughly NNE. Just above the tules, the trees include a lone slender euc. The bird was in the tules just to the left of this tree. A scope is helpful to get good looks, but it is easily identifiable through binoculars.

It was cool and overcast this morning. My guess is that this bird is most likely to show at dawn and dusk.

Nick Lethaby

Goleta


SB Harbor This Morning

Glenn Kincaid
 

Out on the breakwater on a rather gloomy morning, birds of minor note - large flock of Elegant Terns, 2 Wandering Tattlers, and a Surfbird.

Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara


Birabent Canyon, 2018-04-23

Wim van Dam
 

This Monday I checked out Birabent Canyon to see how spring was doing. It was warm and busy with hikers, but nevertheless enjoyable. 

Breeding-wise the following birds were of note: the local pair of COMMON RAVEN, a pair of VIOLET-GREEN SWALLOW, several RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW, a pair+ of CANYON WREN, and a HAIRY WOODPECKER nest. As expected, singing/nesting HOUSE WREN were everywhere. 

Otherwise, I got a brief look of a CATHARUS Sp, a NASHVILLE WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, and a few WILSON'S WARBLER. 


The tally of butterflies that I managed at the same time can be read here:



Wim van Dam
Solvang, CA
---
SBCO #376+2: Pine Warbler





Lake Los Carneros this morning

Steven Gaulin
 

It's interesting to see what multiple groups, birding the same site in the same time block, did and didn't encounter.
I birded the Lake and associated trails from 8:00 - 11:00 AM today. I didn't bump into Rebecca Coulter though I did chat with a few of her students in the parking lot.

In addition to the birds mentioned in Rebecca's post, I saw two different Soras, a Green Heron, a couple of Great-tailed Grackles, a near-alternate-plumaged Eared Grebe, Allen's and Rufous Hummers, as well as several singing CA Thrashers and Black-Headed Grosbeaks. Most lovely was a single male Blue Grosbeak loosely associating with a large flock (~80) of Scaly-breasted Munias, east of the S.E. lobe of the Lake. For photography folks, Ruddy Ducks are plumage-perfect right now. 

I also missed the Fulvous Whistling-Duck today. Where has it gone after such a long sojourn?

Good birding!
Steven Gaulin
Santa Barbara


Consider Moving Flickr Images to eBird Macaulay Library... Now!

Jamie Chavez
 

For regular Flickr users, you may have received the notice that "Flickr has agreed to be acquired by SmugMug" or you might have noticed the new little icon at the top of the Flickr page. What this means for older Flickr photo links embedded in eBird checklists is anyone's guess. Things may completely change in the near future. What seemed like a great idea at the time - embedding photo images into your eBird checklists - may now become a mess of broken links or missing URL's. This has already happened with Google images. See this example of a perfectly fine checklist with embedded photos that has become marginally useful for displaying what was present (click on any image):


I'm not picking on Sheri, this is one example I found. I had several like this myself. Google images were later replaced by thumbnails that are too small for the checklist and when you try to see the full sized image it no longer exists. This is why eBird worked so hard on creating a means for adding photo documentation that is part of the checklist submittal process managed and maintained at Cornell Lab. The point of my message is to encourage those of you who care about your embedded photos to consider replacing them with uploaded photos directly to the Macaulay Library/eBird very soon. I worked on this several months ago by downloading my eBird data, sorting for Flickr images and replacing all of them with photos uploaded directly to eBird as we do today. Some images are really important to me. Lifers, documentation of unusual occurrences, map routes or GPS tracks, etc. Even though my photos of a Red-necked Stint at SM river mouth are poor (35mm slide scans) it means a lot to me to have this on a checklist since it was a life bird and takes me back to the moment. If this is of interest to you consider taking the time NOW to replace your Flickr photos or at least download your photos from Flickr so you can do this later.

Here's how to find which of your eBird checklists have embedded Flickr photos:

1. Go to the My eBird tab
2. On the right side, click Download my Data
3. Verify your email address and click Submit
4. Check your email after a few minutes and look for the message, Your eBird data are now available for download
5. Click on the link and download the zip folder and save it to your computer
6. Open this spreadsheet file, sort or find "Flickr" and a listing of all checklists with "Flickr" will be easily located. Usually in the form of a Flickr photo URL or with this word in comments
From here you can copy the URL to find the photo so you can download and save it to your computer. You can then edit your checklist replacing the Flickr photo and uploading it to the Macaulay Library/eBird.

Yes, this is a bit tedious, but probably a lot less trouble than when and if SmugMug changes all the URL's and the links no longer work. If someone has a better suggestion for doing this maybe pass it along. If you don't like SmugMug for some reason (I have no opinion one way or the other) you have until May 25th to download your Flickr images before they become part of SmugMug and whatever new URL's they provide for them.


--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


Colson Canyon

John Deacon
 

All:

I had 44 avian species in about 4 hours today at Colson Canyon.  Highlights were a MacGillivray's Warbler, FOS Western Wood Pewee, FOS Lazuli Bunting, audible and visual Mountain Quail and one Northern Pygmy Owl.  Black Headed Grosbeaks were noted at almost every stop.  Creek crossings are drying up but still a rough ride for anything but a high clearance vehicle.  Wildflowers are increasing in numbers and diversity.  Only 4 separate species of butterflies were noted.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44878726


John Deacon
iseekbirds@...


Botanic Garden April 23, 2018

Florence Sanchez
 

I got up to the Garden this morning and found that the fog had burned off there, so bird activity was pretty good.  The warbler surge of last week has passed but there were some other interesting species instead.

Best find was an unexpected Yellow-breasted Chat in an oak on the East Slope behind the Porter Trail. This is only the second Chat I have found in the Garden in many years of birding, and that spot is unusual habitat for one.  In the same area was an Ash-throated Flycatcher.  Continuing migrant warblers on the East slope were a single each Wilson's Warbler and Black-throated Gray.  One Costa's hummingbird continues in his previous location on the Porter Trail.

In the Canyon, I found at least 3 continuing Warbling Vireos, singing Yellow-rumps, one Townsend's and another Wilson's Warbler.  Also, a Yellow Warbler continues in the location I found it on Friday.  The Wilson's Warbler was hanging out at a popular bathing spot on the creek above the dam.  As I watched it, I spotted a male Lazuli Bunting quietly sitting on a sapling next to the Creek.  It flew off, but a few minutes later, I spotted a female Lazuli who had gone down to bathe and was preening herself dry. A nice Western Tanager was in the top of a tall sycamore tree along the creek.  I also had flyovers of Western Bluebirds, an uncommon species in the Garden.

"The matinee changes daily."  That's the birding mantra these days.

Florence Sanchez