Date   

Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Does this look like a Lesser Yellowlegs?

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

Yes, Lesser.

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of John Callender
Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 10:06 AM
To: main@sbcobirding.groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Does this look like a Lesser Yellowlegs?

 

This morning I went looking for the Cattle Egret Glenn Kincaid found at Devereaux Slough yesterday. I was unsuccessful, though there were lots of other interesting birds, including a Greater White-fronted Goose that was associating with a large flock of Canada Geese. Details (and poor photos) here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47725520

My main reason for posting, though, is to ask for opinions on the yellowlegs I saw when I continued south and birded at Coal Oil Point. The bird was in the slough channel near its south end where it curves to the west; I had distant views from the trail above near the parking area. I want to say it was a Lesser Yellowlegs; the beak looked straight to me, and short relative to the head, and the bird's overall size maybe seemed smallish compared to a nearby Marbled Godwit. I'd appreciate hearing any opinions people have based on the (again, poor) photos here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47725688

Thanks!

John Callender
Carpinteria


Does this look like a Lesser Yellowlegs?

John Callender
 

This morning I went looking for the Cattle Egret Glenn Kincaid found at Devereaux Slough yesterday. I was unsuccessful, though there were lots of other interesting birds, including a Greater White-fronted Goose that was associating with a large flock of Canada Geese. Details (and poor photos) here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47725520

My main reason for posting, though, is to ask for opinions on the yellowlegs I saw when I continued south and birded at Coal Oil Point. The bird was in the slough channel near its south end where it curves to the west; I had distant views from the trail above near the parking area. I want to say it was a Lesser Yellowlegs; the beak looked straight to me, and short relative to the head, and the bird's overall size maybe seemed smallish compared to a nearby Marbled Godwit. I'd appreciate hearing any opinions people have based on the (again, poor) photos here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47725688

Thanks!

John Callender
Carpinteria


Re: birding today at west campus bluffs, Devereux, Goleta Beach

Jamie Chavez
 

Is anyone seeing a male Redhead at Devereux? One was reported to eBird on Aug 2 and again on Aug 6 that I'm trying to confirm. Please report if you do.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


On Tue, Aug 7, 2018 at 4:13 PM Joan Lentz <joanlentz@...> wrote:
Hi All:
Trying to stay cool, I hit the above destinations, some of which were quite birdy, and all of which were cooler than inland!  
At West Campus bluffs to Coal Oil Point, lots of Sanderlings, a fair number of Western Sandpipers including quite a few juveniles, Semipalmated Plovers, but few larger waders…..and nothing unusual.  At Sands Beach, you can see Snowy Plovers, scope necessary, and a big flock of Black-bellied Plovers way distant at the south end of Devereux.
Then to Devereux Slough, where I found David Levasheff, Jeff Hanson, and Adrian O’Loughlen and none of us could relocate the Cattle Egret that Glenn Kincaid had seen a couple of hours earlier…..  Large numbers of Great and Snowy Egrets feeding in the main channel, as the fishing is good there, and the water level is dropping.  At the “bridge to nowhere” was a very fresh juvie Spotted Sandpiper accompanied by a breeding plumaged adult.  A few shorebirds there, but not as many as on the wrack at the open beach.
At Goleta Beach, I finally got to see the YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, by walking around to the main entrance bridge, and looking back at the edge of the channel behind the caretaker’s house, where the night-heron was standing still as a statue.  I’d never have found it if Adrian hadn’t told me what to do.  It wasn’t visible from the viewing platform at all.
Then a quick drive down to the eastern end of the Goleta Beach parking lot, where the REDDISH EGRET continued, standing in full view on the north side of the lagoon on the mudflats.  Also here were 4 Caspian Terns.
eBird lists here:

Good birding!
Joan Lentz

--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


Ocean Park banded Knot

John Luther <aplomado-falcon@...>
 

While searching for Black Tern (and seeing at least one) at Ocean Park west of Lompoc yesterday, Aug 6, I saw a single Knot that was banded.  It had a silver band on its right leg and a green flag band on its left leg up by the belly feathers.  I could not read any numbers or letters on the green flag as the bird was too far away on the beach west of the RR trestle where there were many Least Terns.  If anyone knows who might have banded with green flags please pass this information on to them and please let Santa Barbara birders know as I believe it would be of general interest to Santa Barbara birders.    

John Luther
Oakland 


birding today at west campus bluffs, Devereux, Goleta Beach

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
Trying to stay cool, I hit the above destinations, some of which were quite birdy, and all of which were cooler than inland!  
At West Campus bluffs to Coal Oil Point, lots of Sanderlings, a fair number of Western Sandpipers including quite a few juveniles, Semipalmated Plovers, but few larger waders…..and nothing unusual.  At Sands Beach, you can see Snowy Plovers, scope necessary, and a big flock of Black-bellied Plovers way distant at the south end of Devereux.
Then to Devereux Slough, where I found David Levasheff, Jeff Hanson, and Adrian O’Loughlen and none of us could relocate the Cattle Egret that Glenn Kincaid had seen a couple of hours earlier…..  Large numbers of Great and Snowy Egrets feeding in the main channel, as the fishing is good there, and the water level is dropping.  At the “bridge to nowhere” was a very fresh juvie Spotted Sandpiper accompanied by a breeding plumaged adult.  A few shorebirds there, but not as many as on the wrack at the open beach.
At Goleta Beach, I finally got to see the YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON, by walking around to the main entrance bridge, and looking back at the edge of the channel behind the caretaker’s house, where the night-heron was standing still as a statue.  I’d never have found it if Adrian hadn’t told me what to do.  It wasn’t visible from the viewing platform at all.
Then a quick drive down to the eastern end of the Goleta Beach parking lot, where the REDDISH EGRET continued, standing in full view on the north side of the lagoon on the mudflats.  Also here were 4 Caspian Terns.
eBird lists here:

Good birding!
Joan Lentz


Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Cattle Egret at Devereux Slough

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

One ‘fun fact’: I think Cattle Egret is probably harder to see now in the county than Reddish Egret or Yellow-crowned Night-Heron. Neither of the latter were even recorded for the county when I first moved here in 2000. The nationwide decline in Cattle Egrets, at least on the edges of their range, has been astonishing.

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Glenn Kincaid
Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2018 12:08 PM
To: sbcobirding@groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Cattle Egret at Devereux Slough

 

Early this morning there was a single Cattle Egret among an impressive collection of nearly 100 Herons and Egrets working the depressingly small channel of water at Devereux Slough.  There were very few other birds around.

 

Distant photo in the checklist below.

 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47706081

 

Glenn Kincaid

Santa Barbara


Cattle Egret at Devereux Slough

Glenn Kincaid
 

Early this morning there was a single Cattle Egret among an impressive collection of nearly 100 Herons and Egrets working the depressingly small channel of water at Devereux Slough.  There were very few other birds around.

Distant photo in the checklist below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47706081

Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara


Nazca Booby In Ventura

Glenn Kincaid
 

Hi All -

I saw of photo posted this AM on Facebook of a Nazca Booby ON THE BEACH in Ventura. May be worth keeping an eye out for one along SB County beaches and shores.

Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara


Yellow-crowned, Little Blue

Hugh Ranson
 

The juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, found by Adrian on 8/2, remains at
Goleta Beach this morning. I first saw it directly below the viewing platform,
and then it walked along the rocks to the east. As I was about to leave the
Little Blue Heron flew in.

A couple of photos here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/159344319@N03/with/42984833975/

For those interested, there seems to be a migration event going on with Red Rock
Skimmers (dragonflies). Whilst at the beach, at least 30 flew east in the 15
minutes I was there.

Hugh Ranson
Santa Barbara


First of Season Birds in Carp

Rob Denholtz
 

Carpinteria Salt Marsh, Monday morning, August 6, 2018

First of Season birds:

in Marsh Park:  7 DOWTICHER sp. AND 2 GREATER YELLOWLEGS
Santa Monica Creek:  4 KILLDEER

Additionally, on Franklin Creek, just north of the footbridge, 2 juvenile YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS.  CLIFF SWALLOWS are still here, although in smaller numbers and the occasional BARN SWALLOW is also seen.

Rob Denholtz
Carp


Ocean Beach Park - Sunday AM

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

I checked Ocean Beach very early. I was not able to scan the island because of unfavorable light so missed the egret found by Dave. The two Black Terns were still present, either roosting on the sand berm or fishing up river with at least 35 Least Terns. Shorebird migration was very light with a Baird's Sandpiper and a Lesser Yellowlegs being best. There are good numbers of both phalaropes using the ponds by the road now.

Water levels do not seem to be dropping very fast and, in fact, might even be rising. So not sure if we will get decent habitat later on. The upcoming hot weather will hopefully help.

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200
Work: 805 562 5106


Reddish Egret, Ocean Park

Dave Compton
 

A Reddish Egret was on the island at the Santa Ynez River estuary (Ocean Park) this morning. The bird was distant, and it was a bit foggy, so looks were not great. But it's probably a juvenile. The bill was all dark, and you could see a slight pinkish wash on the head and at the base of the neck. I thought I got a hint of pale edges to the wing coverts, but I was not 100% sure.

Nothing else of particular note. Conditions are still as Nick Lethaby reported last week. I counted about 20 Least Terns in the air at one time at the mouth, and I conservatively entered 25 in my eBird checklist. The variety of shorebirds is not greatly different from last week. But the species list was slightly different, and totals were probably a little down overall. 

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara


Re: Goleta Beaches Saturday

Robert Lindsay
 

Oops, all Semipalmated birds were plovers, no Semipalmated Sandpipers. (I need a better editor)

 

Sorry 'bout that.

Rob Lindsay

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Robert Lindsay
Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2018 10:58 AM
To: sbcobirding@groups.io
Subject: [sbcobirding] Goleta Beaches Saturday

 

Saturday, 8/4, 7-10:30 am

 

Decided to take advantage of the receding neap low tide this morning and see how the shorebirds are doing.

 

Devereaux, first pullout: A few least Sandpipers and Snowy Plovers along the channel.

 

Devereaux, Bridge to Nowhere: Bad day to be a small fish there today. I counted 28 Snowy Egrets, 25 Great Egrets, 8 Great Blue Heron, 9 Black-crowned Night Heron, and a Green Heron. I know these are all common species but I don't recall seeing so many in one place (all within 20 yards of the bridge).

 

COP and Plover Reserve: All the beaches I visited this morning were covered in washed up kelp and seaweed. As a result, all beaches had lots of swallows (Barn, Cliff and Northern Rough-winged). Barn were the most common here by far. Shorebirds are back in big numbers. Quite a few Black-bellied Plover, most still quite black bellied. A few Whimbrel. Lots of Semipalmated Plover (some in very sharp plumage), Sanderling, and Least Sandpiper. Two Black Turnstone at the point. One Dunlin and One Western Sandpiper were seen. At the preserve the Snowy Plover were numerous including many downy young. There were 8 plastic Least Tern decoys nestled in the dunes but I didn't see any actual terns while I was there. Almost no birds out in the ocean.

 

Goleta Beach Park: The Little Blue Heron was the only such bird feeding near the slough outlet at the east end of the park A few herons and Egrets were up in the nests with the cormorants. No Reddish Egret while I was there.

 

East Campus Beach and Campus Point: Lots of activity. I counted 20 Greater Yellowlegs on the walk to Campus Point from Goleta Beach. There were also 3 Wandering Tattler and three Black turnstone along this stretch. Almost all the Swallows here were Cliff. Included in this stretch of beach were many Semipalmated Sandpipers and Least Sandpipers. The rocks at the point had two more Black Turnstone, another Wandering Tattler, and a very spotted Spotted Sandpiper. The lagoon was virtually empty of birds save a few cormorants perched on waterside snags. The beach had a very few Heerman's Gull. All other gulls I saw this morning were Western.

 

So it looks like shorebird action is continuing to increase along the south coast. It will be interesting to see how good it gets in the weeks ahead and I'm looking forward to land birds starting to pick up soon.

 

That's all,

Rob Lindsay

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jamie Chavez
Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2018 8:37 AM
To: John Deacon; sbcobirding@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Mallards

 

Hi John, et al,

 

eBird is about to update the database with the annual August taxonomic update and they are in the process of implementing some checklist review changes at the same time so expect a few oddities such as Mallards listed as rare through the eBird RBA's. Disregard stuff like this as it will get worked out soon. Continue to submit checklists to eBird per usual and report rarities to local listserves if you do find something rare so the word can get out and there are no misunderstandings about what we are reading through the eBird RBA's.

 

Thanks, everyone,

 

Jamie Chavez

Santa Maria, CA

 

 

On Sat, Aug 4, 2018 at 8:28 AM John Deacon <iseekbirds@...> wrote:

Hi Jamie. How come Northern Mallard showed up as rare on SLO and SBC birding sites? 

John

--

Jamie M. Chavez

Santa Maria, CA


Goleta Beaches Saturday

Robert Lindsay
 

Saturday, 8/4, 7-10:30 am

 

Decided to take advantage of the receding neap low tide this morning and see how the shorebirds are doing.

 

Devereaux, first pullout: A few least Sandpipers and Snowy Plovers along the channel.

 

Devereaux, Bridge to Nowhere: Bad day to be a small fish there today. I counted 28 Snowy Egrets, 25 Great Egrets, 8 Great Blue Heron, 9 Black-crowned Night Heron, and a Green Heron. I know these are all common species but I don't recall seeing so many in one place (all within 20 yards of the bridge).

 

COP and Plover Reserve: All the beaches I visited this morning were covered in washed up kelp and seaweed. As a result, all beaches had lots of swallows (Barn, Cliff and Northern Rough-winged). Barn were the most common here by far. Shorebirds are back in big numbers. Quite a few Black-bellied Plover, most still quite black bellied. A few Whimbrel. Lots of Semipalmated Plover (some in very sharp plumage), Sanderling, and Least Sandpiper. Two Black Turnstone at the point. One Dunlin and One Western Sandpiper were seen. At the preserve the Snowy Plover were numerous including many downy young. There were 8 plastic Least Tern decoys nestled in the dunes but I didn't see any actual terns while I was there. Almost no birds out in the ocean.

 

Goleta Beach Park: The Little Blue Heron was the only such bird feeding near the slough outlet at the east end of the park A few herons and Egrets were up in the nests with the cormorants. No Reddish Egret while I was there.

 

East Campus Beach and Campus Point: Lots of activity. I counted 20 Greater Yellowlegs on the walk to Campus Point from Goleta Beach. There were also 3 Wandering Tattler and three Black turnstone along this stretch. Almost all the Swallows here were Cliff. Included in this stretch of beach were many Semipalmated Sandpipers and Least Sandpipers. The rocks at the point had two more Black Turnstone, another Wandering Tattler, and a very spotted Spotted Sandpiper. The lagoon was virtually empty of birds save a few cormorants perched on waterside snags. The beach had a very few Heerman's Gull. All other gulls I saw this morning were Western.

 

So it looks like shorebird action is continuing to increase along the south coast. It will be interesting to see how good it gets in the weeks ahead and I'm looking forward to land birds starting to pick up soon.

 

That's all,

Rob Lindsay

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jamie Chavez
Sent: Saturday, August 04, 2018 8:37 AM
To: John Deacon; sbcobirding@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Mallards

 

Hi John, et al,

 

eBird is about to update the database with the annual August taxonomic update and they are in the process of implementing some checklist review changes at the same time so expect a few oddities such as Mallards listed as rare through the eBird RBA's. Disregard stuff like this as it will get worked out soon. Continue to submit checklists to eBird per usual and report rarities to local listserves if you do find something rare so the word can get out and there are no misunderstandings about what we are reading through the eBird RBA's.

 

Thanks, everyone,

 

Jamie Chavez

Santa Maria, CA

 

 

On Sat, Aug 4, 2018 at 8:28 AM John Deacon <iseekbirds@...> wrote:

Hi Jamie. How come Northern Mallard showed up as rare on SLO and SBC birding sites? 

John

--

Jamie M. Chavez

Santa Maria, CA


Re: Mallards

Jamie Chavez
 

Hi John, et al,

eBird is about to update the database with the annual August taxonomic update and they are in the process of implementing some checklist review changes at the same time so expect a few oddities such as Mallards listed as rare through the eBird RBA's. Disregard stuff like this as it will get worked out soon. Continue to submit checklists to eBird per usual and report rarities to local listserves if you do find something rare so the word can get out and there are no misunderstandings about what we are reading through the eBird RBA's.

Thanks, everyone,

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA
 

On Sat, Aug 4, 2018 at 8:28 AM John Deacon <iseekbirds@...> wrote:
Hi Jamie. How come Northern Mallard showed up as rare on SLO and SBC birding sites? 

John


--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


Yellow-crowned Night-Heron @ Goleta Slough

Adrian O'Loghlen
 

There was a juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at the mouth of Goleta Slough this afternoon (Thurs).  It seemed to prefer to forage along the south bank of the slough beside the parking lot so it may be difficult to find.  Last time I saw it which was at approx. 4 pm, it was foraging very close to the viewing platform.

Photos at,
https://flic.kr/p/28EgQSL

Adrian O'Loghlen
Goleta


GSD

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

All,

 

I was wondering if there is anyone at GSD we could talk to about having a bit more shorebird-friendly mgmt of water/mud levels in Aug/Sep. There seems to have been very little habitat this year.

 

Nick Lethaby

IoT Ecosystem & TI-RTOS

Texas Instruments Incorporated

6750 Navigator Way, Suite 250

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


Recent Shorebird Birding

Florence Sanchez
 

I birded the Harbor breakwater and Sandspit on Aug. 1 at morning low tide.  A jogger disturbed and dispersed most of the birds roosting on the Sandspit, so I'm not sure what gulls and other species may have been there to start.

On the breakwater and later on the sandspit, there was one wandering Tattler in breeding plumage.  Other shorebirds on the sandspit included 2 Willets, 2 Whimbrels, and 1 Black-bellied Plover.  The usual heron assembly was on the bait barge and an Osprey was sitting on top of the stack for the Harbor dredge.  On the beach near the Yacht Club, there were 3-4 more Black-bellied Plover, a few Whimbrel, and 4-5 Long-billed Curlew, as well as 8-10 Black Turnstones.    While walking down to the Harbor from Shoreline Park, I spotted a Jaeger offshore beyond the bluffs (species not identifiable, but probably a Parasitic).

This morning, I walked the UCSB beaches at low tide.  The east-facing beaches are covered with kelp, which sometimes brings in lots of Turnstones but not today.  Present on the sand were 9 Greater Yellowlegs, 1 Whimbrel, 3-4 Black-bellied Plovers and 6 or so Semi-palmated Plovers.  Further down the beach near Campus Point, there were 5 Black Turnstones.  On the south-facing beaches, I flushed at leased 30 Semi-palmated Plovers and 9-10 Least Sandpipers.  The Lagoon itself was devoid of shorebirds, except for 1 Kildeer and 2 Black-necked Stilts.

Florence  Sanchez


Tattlers

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

All,

 

I had 5 adults at the E end of El Cap today.

 

Regards,

 

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 

 


late posting regarding Wandering Tattler

Steven Gaulin
 

"Mea culpa." I regret the lateness of this post but those who keep tabs on seasonal avian flux may want to know that on Sunday July 30 a single Wandering Tattler was on the large rocks that bend north at the east end of the Santa Barbara harbor breakwater. The bird still had significant breeding-plumage barring on its underparts. A bit farther north a few Black Skimmers and numerous Heermann's Gulls (including nice breeding-plumaged adults and all-dark HY birds) were on the sandspit. About 10 Black Turnstones, with some white breeding-plumage facial and neck markings, were on the large mounds of beached kelp south of the Yacht Club, at the base of the breakwater. An immature Common Loon was confiding as it feed around the shallow edges of the harbor basin.

Steven Gaulin
Santa Barbara