Date   
[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Little Blue Heron (3 reports)
- Ash-throated Flycatcher (1 report)
- Tropical Kingbird (4 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) (1)
- Reported Oct 25, 2018 10:39 by Donald Pendleton
- Goleta Beach County Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4171771,-119.829812&ll=34.4171771,-119.829812
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49443840
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Blue gray in color, bicolor bill, similar in size as snowy egrets."

Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 24, 2018 11:00 by Hans Spiecker
- Goleta Beach County Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4171771,-119.829812&ll=34.4171771,-119.829812
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49423643
- Comments: "Continuing - photo badly out of focus :-(, darkish blue/gray, greenish/gray legs, two tone bill dark at tip."

Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) (1)
- Reported Oct 25, 2018 09:00 by Jeff Baker
- Goleta Beach Park, Goleta US-CA (34.4171,-119.8289), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.417057,-119.828884&ll=34.417057,-119.828884
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49443567
- Comments: "There has been several sightings of a little blue heron in the slough where we were birding."

Ash-throated Flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens) (1)
- Reported Oct 24, 2018 07:55 by Guy Tingos
- Sedgwick Reserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.692571,-120.0405478&ll=34.692571,-120.0405478
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49423140
- Comments: "Seen well. Late bird."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 24, 2018 12:21 by Cuyler Stapelmann
- Andree Clark Bird Refuge, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4215353,-119.6572856&ll=34.4215353,-119.6572856
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49424010
- Comments: "The first kingbird I saw was between the zoo and the third platform; I recorded this bird vocalizing (the vocalizations are consistent with tropical, ruling out Couch's with certainty). Up until today, I have not heard vocalizations from the tropical kingbird in the handful of times I have seen it in the last month. So when the kingbird started vocalizing today, quite often and loudly, it struck me as odd. Why the change?

On my way back to the parking lot, there was another tropical kingbird in one of the sycamores between the first and second platform. I didn't think the tropical kingbird had passed by me on my walk toward the parking lot, so I began thinking there were two, but I didn't really feel like walking back to the third platform to test that hypothesis.

When I was about to get into my car, I heard tropical kingbird vocalizations emanating from the water between the parking lot and island. When I looked out with my binoculars, I saw two tropical kingbirds flying together over the water vocalizing at each other. The breasts were bright yellow, the bills were long, and the vocalizations were right for this species. The appearance of a second kingbird today may explain why they began vocalizing."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Oct 25, 2018 07:43 by Benjamin Byerly
- Campus Pt., Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.404856,-119.8440063&ll=34.404856,-119.8440063
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49438963
- Comments: "Entirely yellow breast up to throat, long bill, brown tail. Flycatching off rocks next to rental shed"

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 22, 2018 07:46 by Jasen Liu
- UC Santa Barbara--campus, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4148759,-119.8450041&ll=34.4148759,-119.8450041
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49424818
- Comments: "Large billed kingbird with extensive yellow on underside. Seen perched in sycamores behind Ucen and in eucalyptus behind San Nicolas Hall."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Oct 24, 2018 07:54 by Mark Holmgren
- UCSB North Campus Open Space (formerly Ocean Meadows Golf Course), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.421439,-119.8713662&ll=34.421439,-119.8713662
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49428831
- Comments: "34.417476, -119.875353 - Kingbird with yellow belly/chest up to the throat. Large bill.... Viewed by Jasen, Darwin, and Mark"

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Oso Flaco open

Mike Stiles
 

I've been informed that the construction is finished and that Oso Flaco Lake is now open.


Mike Stiles

Los Osos

Goleta Thursday

Robert Lindsay
 

Thursday, 10/25, 8-11 am

 

Began at the bridge pull-out at Deveraux hoping for, but missing, a Tropical Kingbird, though I didn't stay there very long. When I arrived, a Greater Yellowlegs (of three present) chased away a medium sized, slender, gray sandpiper that may have been a Solitary Sandpiper but the look was too brief and distant to be sure. The only birds of note there were four Redheads down the channel from the bridge.

 

Dry as it has been, I went to the Coronado puddle thinking it might be a good draw for woodland birds. Wrong. In 15 minutes there not a single bird visited the puddle. I did hear a Flicker and a Wren chattering nearby but nothing else.

 

Lake Los Carneros, on the other hand, was much better. The parking area was alive with warblers though the only ones I heard or got eyes on were Yellow-rumped. Other common birds were out and looking very sharp including Say's Phoebe, an exceptionally well marked Northern Flicker, California Thrasher, Nuttall's Woodpecker and a very cooperative male Cooper's Hawk perched at eye level on an open branch in the fields northeast of the lake. The 'beach' at the north end of the lake had several Dowitchers (too far to ID to species) and more Greater Yellowlegs. A good assortment of ducks were present including Mallard, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Cinnamon Teal and Green-winged Teal. One Cinnamon Teal was very interesting. Its body looked normal but the head was grayish. It also had a tan crescent at the base of the bill shaped just like that of a Blue-winged Teal.  Possibly a hybrid? I also am curious about one of the two swans there. One is obviously a Mute Swan (black bill with pink markings) but the other has a black bill with yellow markings near the base and pink markings nearer the tip. I'm embarrassed to have to ask but can someone bring me up to speed on the species of this individual? White-crowned Sparrows were abundant but I did pick out one Golden-crowned among them near the dam. The pines south of the lake had a Black-shouldered Kite. Finally, as I was returning to the parking lot, an Acorn Woodpecker chased a Sapsucker away from me. I never relocated the bird. All I can say with confidence was that it was a Sapsucker but not a Yellow-bellied. Likely it was a Red-breasted but a Red-naped is possible.

 

At the Goleta Sewage Treatment Plant, ducks were likewise abundant and varied. Species included Mallard, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, and Cinnamon Teal. Several Solitary Sandpipers were strewn around the banks. The only surprise was the absence of Canada Goose which I have found very consistent at this spot.

 

Finished up a Goleta Beach. Ran across a bird class with a flock of Brown-headed Cowbirds literally at their feet near the western-most restrooms. From the east parking lot, the tide was just starting to wash water into the slough. Lots of shorebirds here including all the large sandpipers (Willets, Marbled Godwit, Whimbrels, Long-billed Curlew and Greater Yellowlegs). There were also 47 Black-necked Stilt in this area alone. This is a common species locally but I was surprised at the concentration. I'm not sure where they are breeding around here, but wherever it is, they are doing very well. There were not many gulls present but the group there was also had a Caspian Tern and, I believe, three Elegant Tern. Finally, and not all that noteworthy, every water body I visited had Eared Grebe but I didn't see any Pied-billed. Go figure.

 

That's all,

Rob Lindsay

Correction

Robert Lindsay
 

Sorry Nick, et. al., those were Spotted Sandpiper at the sewage treatment plant this morning.

 

Rob Lindsay

Re: Goleta Thursday

Wim van Dam
 

Rob: The past years GSD has had quite a few successful nests of Black-necked Stilts, maybe that's where they came from. 

I too can confirm the surge in wintering sparrows. My Solvang backyard had its first White-throated Sparrow this morning.

Wim

On Thu, Oct 25, 2018 at 1:59 PM Robert Lindsay <capnbob@...> wrote:

Thursday, 10/25, 8-11 am

 

Began at the bridge pull-out at Deveraux hoping for, but missing, a Tropical Kingbird, though I didn't stay there very long. When I arrived, a Greater Yellowlegs (of three present) chased away a medium sized, slender, gray sandpiper that may have been a Solitary Sandpiper but the look was too brief and distant to be sure. The only birds of note there were four Redheads down the channel from the bridge.

 

Dry as it has been, I went to the Coronado puddle thinking it might be a good draw for woodland birds. Wrong. In 15 minutes there not a single bird visited the puddle. I did hear a Flicker and a Wren chattering nearby but nothing else.

 

Lake Los Carneros, on the other hand, was much better. The parking area was alive with warblers though the only ones I heard or got eyes on were Yellow-rumped. Other common birds were out and looking very sharp including Say's Phoebe, an exceptionally well marked Northern Flicker, California Thrasher, Nuttall's Woodpecker and a very cooperative male Cooper's Hawk perched at eye level on an open branch in the fields northeast of the lake. The 'beach' at the north end of the lake had several Dowitchers (too far to ID to species) and more Greater Yellowlegs. A good assortment of ducks were present including Mallard, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Cinnamon Teal and Green-winged Teal. One Cinnamon Teal was very interesting. Its body looked normal but the head was grayish. It also had a tan crescent at the base of the bill shaped just like that of a Blue-winged Teal.  Possibly a hybrid? I also am curious about one of the two swans there. One is obviously a Mute Swan (black bill with pink markings) but the other has a black bill with yellow markings near the base and pink markings nearer the tip. I'm embarrassed to have to ask but can someone bring me up to speed on the species of this individual? White-crowned Sparrows were abundant but I did pick out one Golden-crowned among them near the dam. The pines south of the lake had a Black-shouldered Kite. Finally, as I was returning to the parking lot, an Acorn Woodpecker chased a Sapsucker away from me. I never relocated the bird. All I can say with confidence was that it was a Sapsucker but not a Yellow-bellied. Likely it was a Red-breasted but a Red-naped is possible.

 

At the Goleta Sewage Treatment Plant, ducks were likewise abundant and varied. Species included Mallard, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, and Cinnamon Teal. Several Solitary Sandpipers were strewn around the banks. The only surprise was the absence of Canada Goose which I have found very consistent at this spot.

 

Finished up a Goleta Beach. Ran across a bird class with a flock of Brown-headed Cowbirds literally at their feet near the western-most restrooms. From the east parking lot, the tide was just starting to wash water into the slough. Lots of shorebirds here including all the large sandpipers (Willets, Marbled Godwit, Whimbrels, Long-billed Curlew and Greater Yellowlegs). There were also 47 Black-necked Stilt in this area alone. This is a common species locally but I was surprised at the concentration. I'm not sure where they are breeding around here, but wherever it is, they are doing very well. There were not many gulls present but the group there was also had a Caspian Tern and, I believe, three Elegant Tern. Finally, and not all that noteworthy, every water body I visited had Eared Grebe but I didn't see any Pied-billed. Go figure.

 

That's all,

Rob Lindsay


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #378+4: Blue-footed Booby

Re: Goleta Thursday

Dave Compton
 

As for breeding by stilts, or what's been documented of breeding by any other species in the county, one need not wonder. I'm sure, after the many emails by Mark Holmgren promoting this tool and asking people to contribute, you all know about this site:



The quickly assembled table below includes Goleta breeding records for Black-necked Stilt going back to 1993. Hopefully, it's readable for most people.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

5407
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.423614
-119.832224
2
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2017 May 12
Levasheff, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
Mother and 3-4 fresh chicks seen on the center pond berm and in the water
 
 
Nests had been observed in the north pond on 25-Apr-17.
 
5254
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42394
-119.85094
15
Goleta Slough, Area L and M
1
2017 May 10
Holmgren, M.
Fledgling under Parental Care
Chick with 1" bill being tended by adults
 
 
in NW corner of Area M
S36721649
5023
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.41539
-119.87502
 
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2017 Apr 20
O'Loghlen, A.
Adult at Nest (clarify)
M & F tending nest
Salicornia
 
Nielsen, J. present
 
3825
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42409
-119.83207
5
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
0
2016 Jul 15
Bevier, L.
Fledgling under Parental Care
Several fledglings, including some small chicks about 1/4 grown (2) and some nearly as large as adults (2), and others in-between (2)
 
 
range of fledgling ages on this date
S30816828
4729
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42369
-119.83167
90
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2015 Apr 24
van Dam, W.
No Suitable Category
2 chicks
 
 
 
Observer
4478
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4236941
-119.8316738
90
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2014 Apr 23
van Dam, W.
Fledgling under Parental Care
4 chicks
 
0
 
observer
2901
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.41532
-119.8755844
200
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 27
Lethaby, N.
Fledgling with Presumed Parent
2 fledglings
 
 
 
observer
2902
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4125
-119.8766329
100
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 27
Lethaby, N.
No suitable category
1 large chick
 
 
 
observer
2903
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.413
-119.8766329
100
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 27
Lethaby, N.
No suitable category
4 smallish chicks
 
 
 
observer
2904
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4135
-119.8766329
100
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 27
Lethaby, N.
No suitable category
2 medium-sized chicks
 
 
 
observer
2893
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4146516
-119.8757355
300
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 26
Lethaby, N.
No suitable category
chicks/fledglings of 4 different ages
 
 
[Suggests 4 total breeding events here in 2010.]
observer
2886
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4146516
-119.8757355
300
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 17
Lethaby, N.
No suitable category
2 groups of chicks
 
 
 
observer
2882
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4145024
-119.8759479
250
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2010 Jun 14
Lethaby, N.
Nestling in Nest
4 newly hatched chicks
 
 
 
observer
2786
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4245758
-119.831747
20
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2010 May 14
Compton, D.
Egg in Nest
nest w/ 4 eggs
ground
0
 
observer
2787
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4245869
-119.8316604
20
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2010 May 14
Compton, D.
Egg in Nest
nest w/ 4 eggs
ground
0
 
observer
2565
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.41548
-119.8751834
100
Goleta, Devereux Slough
2
2009 May 12
Bush, M.
Egg in Nest
ad sitting on nest w/ 1+ eggs
wood plank
0
 
observer
2415
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4242128
-119.8318175
0
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2008 Jul 30
Compton, D.
No suitable category
2 half-size chicks
 
 
See earlier observations for this species, year, and location
observer
2183
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42346
-119.83237
50
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2008 May 22
Compton, D.
Nest in Use (clarify)
4-5 nests still active in this area
 
 
 
observer
2184
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42343
-119.83209
0
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2008 May 22
Compton, D.
Nestling in Nest
3 very small chicks
 
 
Probably from either the nest first observed on 15 April at this site, or the nest first observed on 24 April
observer
2144
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4245508
-119.8506265
10
Goleta Slough, Tecolotito Creek
1
2008 May 14
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
newborn chick (~4 in tall, using camouflage to hide) and 2 agitated ads
 
 
 
Goleta Slough tidal study notes
2059
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42342
-119.83237
20
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2008 Apr 24
Compton, D.
Egg in Nest
Ad on nest w/ 3 eggs
 
 
 
observer
2060
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4235
-119.832
 
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2008 Apr 24
Compton, D.
Egg in Nest
Ad still on nest w/ 4 eggs
mud flat in sewage pond
0
See also 15 April, 22 May observations
observer
2024
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42312
-119.8315
20
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2008 Apr 15
Compton, D.
Egg in Nest
Ad on nest w/ 4 eggs
mud flat in sewage pond
 
See also 24 April observation
observer
1929
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42299
-119.83207
0
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
6
2007 Jul 27
Compton, D.
Fledgling with Presumed Parent
2 juvs 2/3 size of ad
 
 
 
observer
1265
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4224042
-119.8312888
0
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2006 Jul 25
Compton, D.
Fledgling with Presumed Parent
2 juveniles, 1/2 leg-length and 1/3 body size of adults
 
 
 
Observer
1266
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4237743
-119.8312915
0
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2006 Jul 25
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
1 juvenile half adult body size
 
 
 
Observer
1267
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42316
-119.8311512
0
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2006 Jul 25
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
2 juveniles of full body size, but wings not full length
 
 
 
Observer
1210
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4247736
-119.8499597
10
Goleta Slough, Area E/F
1
2006 Jun 28
Compton, D.
Fledgling with Presumed Parent
2 juveniles, approx. 1/3 the height of an adult
 
 
With McDonald, B
Observer
964
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4241
-119.8501921
0
Goleta Slough, Area L/M
1
2005 Jun 29
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
1 approximately one-week-old chick, not recorded previously
 
 
 
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
871
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4239299
-119.8501921
0
Goleta Slough, Area L/M
1
2005 Jun 1
Compton, D.
Nestling in Nest
3 very small chicks, more than 1 day old.
 
 
 
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
589
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42356
-119.83162
150
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2004 Jun 25
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
2 chicks, 3/4 height of adults (8+ adults present)
 
 
See also 2 other entries for this date. Apparently, there were at least three pairs in the area.
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
590
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4236
-119.83162
150
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2004 Jun 25
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
1 chick, 2/3 height of adults (8+ adults present)
 
 
See also 2 other entries for this date. Apparently, there were at least three pairs in the area.
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
591
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4237
-119.83162
150
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2004 Jun 25
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
1 chick, <1/2 height of adults, walking unsteadily, dull gray head, mottled brown mantle
 
 
See also 2 other entries for this date. Apparently, there were at least three pairs in the area.
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
5828
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42406
-119.83161
60
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
2002 Jun 20
Hubbard, D.
Adult at Nest (clarify)
Among 4 Stilts present was one nesting
cement on ground
0
 
Goleta Sanitary District 20 June 2002.doc
277
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4232
-119.8315851
150
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
5
2001 Jul 11
Compton, D.
Fledgling under Parental Care
4 full-sized juveniles
 
 
One grown juvenile was present on 9 August. Could this be one of the four seen previously?
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
206
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42799
-119.8536
200
Goleta Slough, W end of Runway 7-25
2
2001 Apr 6
Ball, M.
Copulation
Copulating pair
 
 
Compton field notes, airport project for URS
CCBER Fieldnote Archive, Ball notes
5483
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.4228
-119.83142
40
Goleta Sanitary District Plant
4
1999 Jun 7
Kelly, M.
Fledgling under Parental Care
4 adults incubating, one with 4 eggs seen once she lifted off. 4 other adults were with walking chicks.
ground
 
 
Goleta Sanitary District Ponds 7 June 1999.pdf
3312
Black-necked Stilt
BNST
34.42141
-119.84933
60
Goleta Slough, Area K
1
1993 Jul 22
Kisner, D.
Nestling in Nest
2 newly hatched young in the Salicornia islands in the hardpan.
 
 
 
 


On Thu, Oct 25, 2018 at 2:26 PM Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:
Rob: The past years GSD has had quite a few successful nests of Black-necked Stilts, maybe that's where they came from. 

I too can confirm the surge in wintering sparrows. My Solvang backyard had its first White-throated Sparrow this morning.

Wim

On Thu, Oct 25, 2018 at 1:59 PM Robert Lindsay <capnbob@...> wrote:

Thursday, 10/25, 8-11 am

 

Began at the bridge pull-out at Deveraux hoping for, but missing, a Tropical Kingbird, though I didn't stay there very long. When I arrived, a Greater Yellowlegs (of three present) chased away a medium sized, slender, gray sandpiper that may have been a Solitary Sandpiper but the look was too brief and distant to be sure. The only birds of note there were four Redheads down the channel from the bridge.

 

Dry as it has been, I went to the Coronado puddle thinking it might be a good draw for woodland birds. Wrong. In 15 minutes there not a single bird visited the puddle. I did hear a Flicker and a Wren chattering nearby but nothing else.

 

Lake Los Carneros, on the other hand, was much better. The parking area was alive with warblers though the only ones I heard or got eyes on were Yellow-rumped. Other common birds were out and looking very sharp including Say's Phoebe, an exceptionally well marked Northern Flicker, California Thrasher, Nuttall's Woodpecker and a very cooperative male Cooper's Hawk perched at eye level on an open branch in the fields northeast of the lake. The 'beach' at the north end of the lake had several Dowitchers (too far to ID to species) and more Greater Yellowlegs. A good assortment of ducks were present including Mallard, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Cinnamon Teal and Green-winged Teal. One Cinnamon Teal was very interesting. Its body looked normal but the head was grayish. It also had a tan crescent at the base of the bill shaped just like that of a Blue-winged Teal.  Possibly a hybrid? I also am curious about one of the two swans there. One is obviously a Mute Swan (black bill with pink markings) but the other has a black bill with yellow markings near the base and pink markings nearer the tip. I'm embarrassed to have to ask but can someone bring me up to speed on the species of this individual? White-crowned Sparrows were abundant but I did pick out one Golden-crowned among them near the dam. The pines south of the lake had a Black-shouldered Kite. Finally, as I was returning to the parking lot, an Acorn Woodpecker chased a Sapsucker away from me. I never relocated the bird. All I can say with confidence was that it was a Sapsucker but not a Yellow-bellied. Likely it was a Red-breasted but a Red-naped is possible.

 

At the Goleta Sewage Treatment Plant, ducks were likewise abundant and varied. Species included Mallard, Ruddy Duck, Gadwall, American Wigeon, and Cinnamon Teal. Several Solitary Sandpipers were strewn around the banks. The only surprise was the absence of Canada Goose which I have found very consistent at this spot.

 

Finished up a Goleta Beach. Ran across a bird class with a flock of Brown-headed Cowbirds literally at their feet near the western-most restrooms. From the east parking lot, the tide was just starting to wash water into the slough. Lots of shorebirds here including all the large sandpipers (Willets, Marbled Godwit, Whimbrels, Long-billed Curlew and Greater Yellowlegs). There were also 47 Black-necked Stilt in this area alone. This is a common species locally but I was surprised at the concentration. I'm not sure where they are breeding around here, but wherever it is, they are doing very well. There were not many gulls present but the group there was also had a Caspian Tern and, I believe, three Elegant Tern. Finally, and not all that noteworthy, every water body I visited had Eared Grebe but I didn't see any Pied-billed. Go figure.

 

That's all,

Rob Lindsay


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #378+4: Blue-footed Booby

eBird Breeding Bird Data (was New County eBird Reviewers Announcement)

Jamie Chavez
 

I wanted to reply to Cuyler's comment below because it deserves some follow-up. Cuyler has found a good way to mine the information but I must disagree with the statement that, "Breeding bird data is probably the most valuable information eBird has to offer". This might be true IF the data were vetted but sadly it is not. eBirders can plug-in any breeding bird code they wish to at any time of the year for any species. Try opening a personal list in January and see how you can make an edit to enter "Nest with Eggs" for any species on your list. That is just beyond stupid.

Review of BB data in checklists is not a function (currently) of the eBird review process, therefore, 99.9% of all breeding bird code entries ever entered have never been scrutinized for accuracy. I've seen all sorts of incorrect uses of BB codes. Since this data is not available as an output tool it doesn't really matter, but I've never understood why eBird would permit this if there wasn't a mechanism in place to validate what people are entering. If they ever do start using this gold mine it needs to be cleaned in a major way first.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 2:27 PM Cuyler Stapelmann <cuylerstapelmann@...> wrote:
Breeding bird data is probably the most valuable information eBird has to offer to the consulting world, but it is not easy to access. I am interested to know if anyone has any insights. Thanks.

Cuyler
SB_,_

--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

Re: eBird Breeding Bird Data (was New County eBird Reviewers Announcement)

Cuyler Stapelmann
 

Hi Jamie,

Thanks for your input and your contributions to eBird. I agree that eBird has very valuable data beyond breeding codes. However I think an important qualifier was missed in my email regarding use of the data for consulting (e.g., biological studies for environmental impact reports). I use eBird data for many of the capital improvement projects that I work on to assist in complying with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and Fish and Game Code regulations that protect nesting birds. While no database can replace a nesting bird survey, having more data available regarding which species may be nesting at a site proposed for development would assist planners in addressing potential biological constraints earlier in the project development process. Whereas records in CNDDB are vetted before made available for public use but contains fewer records, eBird has many more records but the data should probably be scrutinized for accuracy before use. I guess my only point is that perhaps this is an underutilized function of eBird that has the potential to significantly contribute to the protection of nesting birds in a practical manner. My two cents anyway. 

Cuyler
SB


On Oct 25, 2018, at 9:48 PM, Jamie Chavez <almiyi@...> wrote:

I wanted to reply to Cuyler's comment below because it deserves some follow-up. Cuyler has found a good way to mine the information but I must disagree with the statement that, "Breeding bird data is probably the most valuable information eBird has to offer". This might be true IF the data were vetted but sadly it is not. eBirders can plug-in any breeding bird code they wish to at any time of the year for any species. Try opening a personal list in January and see how you can make an edit to enter "Nest with Eggs" for any species on your list. That is just beyond stupid.

Review of BB data in checklists is not a function (currently) of the eBird review process, therefore, 99.9% of all breeding bird code entries ever entered have never been scrutinized for accuracy. I've seen all sorts of incorrect uses of BB codes. Since this data is not available as an output tool it doesn't really matter, but I've never understood why eBird would permit this if there wasn't a mechanism in place to validate what people are entering. If they ever do start using this gold mine it needs to be cleaned in a major way first.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 2:27 PM Cuyler Stapelmann <cuylerstapelmann@...> wrote:
Breeding bird data is probably the most valuable information eBird has to offer to the consulting world, but it is not easy to access. I am interested to know if anyone has any insights. Thanks.

Cuyler
SB_,_

--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

Re: eBird Breeding Bird Data (was New County eBird Reviewers Announcement)

Tom Miko
 

Hi,
There is one aspect to this topic that also affects others, under other circumstances: the inability to contact the person(s) who entered that (breeding) data to ask for specifics. This is something that I hope eBird will address, at some point. Currently, there are folks who locally monitor entries for their local patches, and when they see questionable entries, they contact the eBird user who made the entry. This is currently only possible if the person auditing other's observations has the email address or phone number of the person who entered the observation. There should be a way to contact strangers where the person with questions sends an email to the eBird user (perhaps Cc'ing the local eBird admin) without the eBird user's email address or other personal information being revealed.
Tom Miko
LA County 
909.241.3300

On Oct 26, 2018 7:17 AM, "Cuyler Stapelmann" <cuylerstapelmann@...> wrote:
Hi Jamie,

Thanks for your input and your contributions to eBird. I agree that eBird has very valuable data beyond breeding codes. However I think an important qualifier was missed in my email regarding use of the data for consulting (e.g., biological studies for environmental impact reports). I use eBird data for many of the capital improvement projects that I work on to assist in complying with the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and Fish and Game Code regulations that protect nesting birds. While no database can replace a nesting bird survey, having more data available regarding which species may be nesting at a site proposed for development would assist planners in addressing potential biological constraints earlier in the project development process. Whereas records in CNDDB are vetted before made available for public use but contains fewer records, eBird has many more records but the data should probably be scrutinized for accuracy before use. I guess my only point is that perhaps this is an underutilized function of eBird that has the potential to significantly contribute to the protection of nesting birds in a practical manner. My two cents anyway. 

Cuyler
SB


On Oct 25, 2018, at 9:48 PM, Jamie Chavez <almiyi@...> wrote:

I wanted to reply to Cuyler's comment below because it deserves some follow-up. Cuyler has found a good way to mine the information but I must disagree with the statement that, "Breeding bird data is probably the most valuable information eBird has to offer". This might be true IF the data were vetted but sadly it is not. eBirders can plug-in any breeding bird code they wish to at any time of the year for any species. Try opening a personal list in January and see how you can make an edit to enter "Nest with Eggs" for any species on your list. That is just beyond stupid.

Review of BB data in checklists is not a function (currently) of the eBird review process, therefore, 99.9% of all breeding bird code entries ever entered have never been scrutinized for accuracy. I've seen all sorts of incorrect uses of BB codes. Since this data is not available as an output tool it doesn't really matter, but I've never understood why eBird would permit this if there wasn't a mechanism in place to validate what people are entering. If they ever do start using this gold mine it needs to be cleaned in a major way first.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


On Wed, Oct 24, 2018 at 2:27 PM Cuyler Stapelmann <cuylerstapelmann@...> wrote:
Breeding bird data is probably the most valuable information eBird has to offer to the consulting world, but it is not easy to access. I am interested to know if anyone has any insights. Thanks.

Cuyler
SB_,_

--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


Possible Couch's Reported--Andre Clarke

Brad Schram
 

I just received a call from Don Hoechlin who is birding in Santa Barbara right now.  He has a Tropical-type kingbird active at the bird refuge that called while interacting with a Cassin's Kingbird. He listened to playback on his iPhone, and thinks the bird is a Couch's Kingbird based on call.  He's not certain.

The bird likes a dead tree just beyond the second deck lookout beyond the parking area along the railroad tracks.

Just the messenger.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Tropical Kingbird (1 report)
- Black-and-white Warbler (1 report)
- Palm Warbler (3 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 25, 2018 12:51 by Bradley Hacker
- Goleta Bay--West beach, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4101847,-119.8419678&ll=34.4101847,-119.8419678
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49444855
- Comments: "Bright yellow breast extends to base of neck; large bill; forked tail; more-extensive white throat than CaKi. Hi-pitched tittering TrKi call when being chased by CaKi.
At southern edge of parking lot 6 where stairs go down to beach. Later motored farther north along coast road near student vacation suites (dorms)."

Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 24, 2018 08:30 by Libby Patten
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49452484
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Seen foraging along low branches in large cypress tree at the corner of Slough Rd. and West Campus Pt. Lane. Pale cheeks and white throat indicates a female."

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Oct 26, 2018 08:10 by Julie Scotland
- Chase Palm Park, Santa Barbara US-CA (34.4161,-119.6806), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.416114,-119.680598&ll=34.416114,-119.680598
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49469170
- Comments: "Brown warbler with pumping tail. Photos to come."

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (1)
- Reported Oct 26, 2018 08:10 by Conor Scotland
- Chase Palm Park, Santa Barbara US-CA (34.4161,-119.6806), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.416114,-119.680598&ll=34.416114,-119.680598
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49469762
- Comments: "Brown warbler with pumping tail. Photos to come."

Palm Warbler (Setophaga palmarum) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 25, 2018 17:15 by Conor Scotland
- Tracks Behind Chase Palm, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4163495,-119.6826991&ll=34.4163495,-119.6826991
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49451833
- Comments: "80M west of Cesar Chavez, south side of tracks along the fence. Two birds associating with each other, moving from shrubs to the ground and the fence. At one point one of them landed right at my feet. Brown upperparts, pale supercilium, darkish yellow undertail coverts. Faint diffuse streaking in breast. Continual tail wagging."

***********

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Bird Refuge and North Campus Open Space this morning

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
Just wanted to give an update about the presence or I should say absence of any kind of Tropical Kingbird during my brief chase down there this morning. As you heard from Brad Schram, an out-of-town birder thought he might have heard the vocalization of a Couch’s Kingbird.
Indeed, we know there’ve been a number of kingbirds at the Bird Refuge (and elsewhere!) so this should definitely be investigated.
Warning: bring your camera! And be sure that the bird you hear vocalizing LOOKS LIKE A TROPICAL KINGBIRD, and is not a Cassin’s or even a Western Kingbird. Both the latter can make similar calls to Couch’s Kingbird. This is a very tricky i.d., but it is certainly POSSIBLE.
Our problem today was dense fog, which seems to have rolled in right about 11 a.m. & was still there when I left around 12:30. Visibility was terrible.
With the weekend coming up, I’m hoping that many of you will undertake to see if there’s a bird down there that looks like a Tropical Kingbird (however, note several small differences) but that vocalizes like a Couch’s.
Moving to more mundane, but fabulous birding: I had my first taste of the new habitat created at North Campus Open Space this morning. It is open to the public (dogs on leash) & is absolutely gorgeous, filled with birds! Go visit soon, bring a scope if you can, but it’s neat with just binoculars! I can’t wait to see what will turn up when the vegetation fills out. The shorebird habitat is excellent, too.
Good birding!

Joan Lentz

Red-eyed Vireo in IV on Wednesday a.m.

Libby Patten
 

It appears I had a short viewing of a Red-eyed Vireo in IV with my class on Wednesday morning. I'm just getting a chance to review my student's photos. At the time I could tell it was a vireo, but wasn't sure which species until I saw the photo. The location was about a block south of Fortuna Park, just west of the Del Playa eucalyptus. 

The checklist has the photo and location description:

Re: Red-eyed Vireo in IV on Wednesday a.m.

Libby Patten
 

My mistake - location was just west of Camino Majorca (not Del Playa) and at the southern tip of West Campus Lane (road in housing complex). 

Apologies!


On Friday, October 26, 2018, 3:51 PM, Libby Patten via Groups.Io <libby_patten@...> wrote:

It appears I had a short viewing of a Red-eyed Vireo in IV with my class on Wednesday morning. I'm just getting a chance to review my student's photos. At the time I could tell it was a vireo, but wasn't sure which species until I saw the photo. The location was about a block south of Fortuna Park, just west of the Del Playa eucalyptus. 

The checklist has the photo and location description:

Re: Red-eyed Vireo in IV on Wednesday a.m.

Thomas Turner
 

FYI: I did spend an hour and a half looking for this bird this morning without luck. 

-Tom.


On Oct 26, 2018, at 4:57 PM, Libby Patten <libby_patten@...> wrote:

Here you go, Tom!  Hope you can refind it!

http://mapper.acme.com/?ll=34.41136,-119.86977&z=17&t=M&marker0=34.41136%2C-119.86977%2C34.41136%20-119.86977 





On Friday, October 26, 2018, 4:47 PM, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:

Hi Libby. Great find! That’s my back yard and I will definitely look for it. I’m still confused about where you mean, though. Can you maybe send me a dropped pin or something?

Thanks!

-Tom.


On Oct 26, 2018, at 4:05 PM, Libby Patten via Groups.Io <libby_patten@...> wrote:

My mistake - location was just west of Camino Majorca (not Del Playa) and at the southern tip of West Campus Lane (road in housing complex). 

Apologies!


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Friday, October 26, 2018, 3:51 PM, Libby Patten via Groups.Io <libby_patten@...> wrote:

It appears I had a short viewing of a Red-eyed Vireo in IV with my class on Wednesday morning. I'm just getting a chance to review my student's photos. At the time I could tell it was a vireo, but wasn't sure which species until I saw the photo. The location was about a block south of Fortuna Park, just west of the Del Playa eucalyptus. 

The checklist has the photo and location description:

Tropical Kingbirds (and Swamp Sparrow) at Andree Clark Bird Refuge

Dave Compton
 

I spent some time at the Bird Refuge in Santa Barbara this morning, looking for the bird reported as a possible Couch's Kingbird. There are photos of this bird in eBird, here:


Ron Hirst was present when I arrived, and he pointed a kingbird out to me near the first platform, but closer to the railroad tracks, that did not look like the bird in the above checklist. The bird Ron pointed out clearly had a more ragged tail tip than this bird and lacked that shorter tail feather growing in on the bird's right side. It also seemed to have a subtly slimmer, rather long bill, and appeared to be an adult, based on the evenly fresh greater coverts. I later saw this bird near where I believe the possible Couch's was yesterday, in a fallen tree just west of the second viewing platform as you walk west from the parking lot. After a couple of minutes, this bird disappeared, and I heard a Tropical Kingbird calling back in the direction of the first sighting. As I walked back, I saw two large-billed kingbirds on Myoprum on the first (more easterly) island. One then flew back to shore and was calling frequently. This bird had the same short feather on the right side of its tail that you can see in the photos in the above checklist. The call it gave, very persistently, was the typical twitter of a Tropical Kingbird. 

I can't speak to what was heard yesterday, but the description of the call's "cadence" suggests that it was not the "kip" call of a Couch's that is so distinct from any call of a Tropical. So I wonder if the call might've been the same one I heard, and the same one Cuyler Stapleman recorded a couple of days ago. Anyway, I'm pretty confident that there are two Tropical Kingbirds here, and that neither bird I saw was a Couch's.

While birding near the second (middle) platform, I also heard, and then saw poorly, a Swamp Sparrow that was perching up and moving from shrub to shrub, before disappearing near the shore by the second platform.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara


Re: Red-eyed Vireo in IV on Wednesday a.m.

Libby Patten
 

Sorry to hear that, Tom. I was able to get more photos of this bird from my student, Pam Lombardi. I've added some to my eBird list in case anyone wants to scrutinize it further. 

Libby

On Saturday, October 27, 2018, 10:51 AM, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:

FYI: I did spend an hour and a half looking for this bird this morning without luck. 

-Tom.


On Oct 26, 2018, at 4:57 PM, Libby Patten <libby_patten@...> wrote:

Here you go, Tom!  Hope you can refind it!

http://mapper.acme.com/?ll=34.41136,-119.86977&z=17&t=M&marker0=34.41136%2C-119.86977%2C34.41136%20-119.86977 





On Friday, October 26, 2018, 4:47 PM, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:

Hi Libby. Great find! That’s my back yard and I will definitely look for it. I’m still confused about where you mean, though. Can you maybe send me a dropped pin or something?

Thanks!

-Tom.


On Oct 26, 2018, at 4:05 PM, Libby Patten via Groups.Io <libby_patten@...> wrote:

My mistake - location was just west of Camino Majorca (not Del Playa) and at the southern tip of West Campus Lane (road in housing complex). 

Apologies!


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Friday, October 26, 2018, 3:51 PM, Libby Patten via Groups.Io <libby_patten@...> wrote:

It appears I had a short viewing of a Red-eyed Vireo in IV with my class on Wednesday morning. I'm just getting a chance to review my student's photos. At the time I could tell it was a vireo, but wasn't sure which species until I saw the photo. The location was about a block south of Fortuna Park, just west of the Del Playa eucalyptus. 

The checklist has the photo and location description:

LLC Bullock's orioles

William Murdoch
 

A pair in the eucs on the north side of the railway depot.  Two w tanagers were in these trees a few days ago.

--
Bill Murdoch
Santa Barbara

More Band-tailed Pigeons in SM Valley

Jamie Chavez
 

During a walk through Waller Park this morning I spotted a flock of 35 or so Band-tailed Pigeons that dropped into one of the taller Monterey Pines inside the park. They eventually flew off to the south out of the park. As I mentioned in a previous email, this is pretty unusual for Santa Maria Valley. I am in tune to whatever pigeons and doves I see because I'm always on the lookout for this species in the valley. They do not occur here normally so it captured my attention right away. Clearly, there is "something going on" with this species around here which might not be detectable where they are commonly seen (and ignored) in other parts of the county. I may have had a single BTPI  last weekend over Jim May Park too but it was not seen well enough to say for sure. Also in the park, I located a couple of small flocks of Chipping Sparrows near the gazebo, and a male Wood Duck is in the front pond. 

--
Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Black-footed Albatross (1 report)
- Little Blue Heron (1 report)
- Tropical Kingbird (2 reports)
- Red-eyed Vireo (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Black-footed Albatross (Phoebastria nigripes) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Oct 22, 2018 15:17 by Tracy McCarthey
- (34.7494,-121.3736), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.749358,-121.373637&ll=34.749358,-121.373637
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49478420
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Photos"

Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) (1)
- Reported Oct 27, 2018 12:03 by Benjamin Byerly
- Goleta Beach County Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4171771,-119.829812&ll=34.4171771,-119.829812
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49495622
- Comments: "Continuing juvenile "

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (2)
- Reported Oct 27, 2018 08:53 by David Compton
- Andree Clark Bird Refuge, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4215353,-119.6572856&ll=34.4215353,-119.6572856
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49492356
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Ron Hirst pointed out the first bird I saw.. This bird was silent whenever I saw it. It had yellow up through the breast and a long, slim bill compared to Cassin's Kingbird, one of which was also in the area. This individual also had a ragged tip to the tail. The tail feathers obviously had not molted recently and were all roughly the same length. The greater coverts were all evenly fresh, and I therefore assumed this bird to be an adult. I also looked at the folded primary tips on this bird, in relation to the tertials. The bird was apparently molting its primaries, given only one primary was obviously visible beyond the tertials.
The second bird appeared somewhat later. While at the middle viewing platform, I heard a Tropical Kingbird calling back to the east, near where the first kingbird had been perching when I arrived. As I walked back to that area, I saw a kingbird, still calling as a Tropical, fly to the easternmost island in the lagoon and land in the top of a myoporum shrub. Another long-billed kingbird was also ion the island. After a minute or so, one of the kingbirds returned, calling, then chased a Cassin's Kingbird from the sycamore where I had seen the first Tropical. This bird was overall in fresher plumage than the first, and had a tail feather growing in on the right side, exactly as can be seen in the photos of a reported Couch's Kingbird posted here:

https://ebird.org/spain/view/checklist/S49479801

Like the first bird, this one had yellow up through the breast, although I noted in this case that it was more greenish on the upper breast, with no gray anywhere on the breast. The bill was similar in shape to that of the first bird, but I thought maybe a little shorter and stouter. But subtly so. The tail was very fresh, and not at all ragged on the tip, and the outermost rectrix on the bird's right side was short and apparently growing in. The longer tail feather visible on the right side from underneath on the perched bird was relatively round at the tip, while the feather on the left side was pointed toward the outer edge. The tail looked less forked than that of the first bird. Several primary tips were visible beyond the tertials in the folded wing of this bird. There was a somewhat larger gap, but a substantial one, between two primary tips in the middle somewhere (I can't say between which primaries), This didn't strike me as being the obvious gap that appears to be common (consistent)? in Couch's.

I had no doubt the second bird was the one reported in the above checklist. It's persistent call was a typical version of the twitter that I have heard on occasion from Tropicals wintering in California."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Oct 26, 2018 08:53 by Don Hoechlin
- Andree Clark Bird Refuge, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4215353,-119.6572856&ll=34.4215353,-119.6572856
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49479801
- Media: 8 Photos
- Comments: "Similar in size to Cassin’s Kingbird that was in the same dead tree. White throat that graded into bright yellow chest and belly. Greenish back with brown wings with lightly edged wing coverets and secondaries. Brown tail with no notching or white outer tail feathers. Call was like the call on Sibley’s first call recording. Disclaimer I have high frequency hearing loss in left year , but cadence was like the call just mentioned to me. + photos"

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Oct 24, 2018 08:30 by Libby Patten
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49452484
- Media: 7 Photos
- Comments: "Vireo with dark eyestripe, white eyebrow and dark cap. Eye appears to have a dark amber quality. Underparts a mix of white and yellow. Didn't have clear view of back. Found high up in Eucalyptus next to student housing units on west side of row of eucalyptus on Camino Majorca. Tree was just north of where grassland abuts housing area."

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