Date   
Anyone seeing NEOTROPIC CORMORANT?

Joan Lentz <joanlentz@...>
 

Hi all: with Jon Dunn missing Cormorant at Devereux! If anyone has this bird today, can u post to this list or to me? Thx heaps, Joan

Goleta breeding birds of interest

Nick Lethaby
 

This morning  I did a bit of follow up on various Say's Phoebes sightings I have had over the last couple of weeks and found two additional breeding pairs. I also checked a location I had seen an adult carrying food back to some houses a few weeks ago and found there were 4 fledglings sitting shoulder to shoulder on a window sill being fed by both parents. All this makes a total of 6 pairs of Say's Phoebes with fledged young in Goleta this year.

After drawing a blank on any BWTE broods in a dawn visit, I returned to Area K in evening and immediately found a brood of 10 ducklings. These were no bigger than the ducklings in the brood of 10 I photographed a week ago and certainly a different brood. I got better pictures as I have switched my camera to pinpoint focusing. Based on the behavior of BWTE males in the area, there should be another brood hatching in a week or so.

Regards,

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200
Work: 805 562 5106

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Re: Devereux and NCOS today

Dave Compton
 

Herb Elliott emailed me saying that he’d seen the Neotropic Cormorant during the early afternoon. So, it’s still around.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara 

On Sat, Jul 13, 2019 at 5:28 PM Dave Compton <davcompton60@...> wrote:
Earlier today, I visited Devereux Slough and the adjacent UCSB North Campus Open Space. No sign at either location of the Neotropic Cormorant. I make no pronouncements on it's presence or absence from the area in general. We know that it does go other places, but it did seem unusual that it wouldn't be at Devereux at and just before midday.

Not much else to report. Western Sandpipers were in both places, and several Leasts were at NCOS. A lone Short-billed Dowitcher flew over NCOS. An adult and four juvenile White-tailed Kites were in a eucalyptus on the west side of Devereux Slough. Baby Cooper's Hawks were on the east side.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

Devereux and NCOS today

Dave Compton
 

Earlier today, I visited Devereux Slough and the adjacent UCSB North Campus Open Space. No sign at either location of the Neotropic Cormorant. I make no pronouncements on it's presence or absence from the area in general. We know that it does go other places, but it did seem unusual that it wouldn't be at Devereux at and just before midday.

Not much else to report. Western Sandpipers were in both places, and several Leasts were at NCOS. A lone Short-billed Dowitcher flew over NCOS. An adult and four juvenile White-tailed Kites were in a eucalyptus on the west side of Devereux Slough. Baby Cooper's Hawks were on the east side.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

Re: Yellow warblers in odd spots

Florence Sanchez
 

Well, this is a riparian area for sure, but last week I heard a singing Yellow Warbler in the creek behind the FedEx Office on Hope Street, just south of State Street.  This urban creek does seem to pull in riparian species, but I don't recall hearing a Yellow Warbler here this late in the year.  There are some sycamores, but also a lot of Mexican Ash and Eucalyptus trees as well, and the creek banks are a tangle of weeds and some native vegetation.

Florence Sanchez


On Saturday, July 13, 2019, 9:37:57 AM PDT, Dave Compton <davcompton60@...> wrote:


Sticking with the odd place them, I'm sure folks must've noticed one has been singing for the past couple of months from the eucalyptus behind the Environmental Health and Safety building at UCSB, which is just across the street from the Area K overlook. I heard what was almost certainly a fledgling around June 1, but never saw it. Mark and Adrian's BBS includes a breeding record from this location, which is decidedly UN-riparian, and even lacks on obvious source of moisture, which otherwise is about the only common theme I've observed among local Yellow Warbler breeding spots (which in some cases has just included irrigation of lawns and plantings). 

By the way, this year I didn't check most of the usual spots I've had this species locally. And it's getting late to make much of an odd Yellow Warbler, as the species starts to move south about now.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 9:15 PM Joan Lentz via Groups.Io <joanlentz=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Wim and all: 
I agree with both views.  I’ve never heard so many Yellow Warblers everywhere.  It’s like there’s one or two wherever you go, including absolutely none traditional Yellow Warbler spots.  There’s just always one or two singing in the distance, or across the street, or wherever you are.  I cannot remember EVER hearing so many YeWas away from more traditional riparian areas.   And in the more riparian areas, the numbers seem up, to which I attribute the increased rainfall of the past winter.
May I also make a plea for those of you who want to increase your bird lists?  Get hearing aids.  You’ll think the birding is pretty dull until you can actually hear the birds again!  I love mine!
Not that Yellow Warbler is a difficult sound, but there are others, and we’re not getting good data if we can’t hear what’s there !
Good birding to all!
Joan 










On Jul 12, 2019, at 4:05 PM, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:

Re Yellow Warblers: In previous years I have had them show up in my Solvang yard in summer, post-breeding. This year, though, I have heard them throughout spring, suggesting they might be breeding nearby. So my question is: did other people have spring Yellow Warblers at locations where they are typically missing during the breeding season?

Wim 

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 2:57 PM Nick Lethaby via Groups.Io <nlethaby=ti.com@groups.io> wrote:

All,

 

A couple of years ago, Dave Compton pointed that he was finding Yellow Warblers summering/breeding in odd habitats. Despite the refresh our wetlands have gotten this last winter, this habit seems to be persisting. I have had two birds singing all summer in eucalyptus and pepper trees along Cathedral Oaks just west of Winchester Canyon. There has been one bird in this area for 3 years now. I also had a Yellow Warbler at Alice Keck Park Memorial Gardens today. I would be interested if anyone else is seeing this.

 

Regards,

 

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

Re: Yellow warblers in odd spots

Dave Compton
 

Sticking with the odd place them, I'm sure folks must've noticed one has been singing for the past couple of months from the eucalyptus behind the Environmental Health and Safety building at UCSB, which is just across the street from the Area K overlook. I heard what was almost certainly a fledgling around June 1, but never saw it. Mark and Adrian's BBS includes a breeding record from this location, which is decidedly UN-riparian, and even lacks on obvious source of moisture, which otherwise is about the only common theme I've observed among local Yellow Warbler breeding spots (which in some cases has just included irrigation of lawns and plantings). 

By the way, this year I didn't check most of the usual spots I've had this species locally. And it's getting late to make much of an odd Yellow Warbler, as the species starts to move south about now.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 9:15 PM Joan Lentz via Groups.Io <joanlentz=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Wim and all: 
I agree with both views.  I’ve never heard so many Yellow Warblers everywhere.  It’s like there’s one or two wherever you go, including absolutely none traditional Yellow Warbler spots.  There’s just always one or two singing in the distance, or across the street, or wherever you are.  I cannot remember EVER hearing so many YeWas away from more traditional riparian areas.   And in the more riparian areas, the numbers seem up, to which I attribute the increased rainfall of the past winter.
May I also make a plea for those of you who want to increase your bird lists?  Get hearing aids.  You’ll think the birding is pretty dull until you can actually hear the birds again!  I love mine!
Not that Yellow Warbler is a difficult sound, but there are others, and we’re not getting good data if we can’t hear what’s there !
Good birding to all!
Joan 










On Jul 12, 2019, at 4:05 PM, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:

Re Yellow Warblers: In previous years I have had them show up in my Solvang yard in summer, post-breeding. This year, though, I have heard them throughout spring, suggesting they might be breeding nearby. So my question is: did other people have spring Yellow Warblers at locations where they are typically missing during the breeding season?

Wim 

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 2:57 PM Nick Lethaby via Groups.Io <nlethaby=ti.com@groups.io> wrote:

All,

 

A couple of years ago, Dave Compton pointed that he was finding Yellow Warblers summering/breeding in odd habitats. Despite the refresh our wetlands have gotten this last winter, this habit seems to be persisting. I have had two birds singing all summer in eucalyptus and pepper trees along Cathedral Oaks just west of Winchester Canyon. There has been one bird in this area for 3 years now. I also had a Yellow Warbler at Alice Keck Park Memorial Gardens today. I would be interested if anyone else is seeing this.

 

Regards,

 

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

Re: Yellow warblers in odd spots

Joan Lentz <joanlentz@...>
 

Wim and all: 
I agree with both views.  I’ve never heard so many Yellow Warblers everywhere.  It’s like there’s one or two wherever you go, including absolutely none traditional Yellow Warbler spots.  There’s just always one or two singing in the distance, or across the street, or wherever you are.  I cannot remember EVER hearing so many YeWas away from more traditional riparian areas.   And in the more riparian areas, the numbers seem up, to which I attribute the increased rainfall of the past winter.
May I also make a plea for those of you who want to increase your bird lists?  Get hearing aids.  You’ll think the birding is pretty dull until you can actually hear the birds again!  I love mine!
Not that Yellow Warbler is a difficult sound, but there are others, and we’re not getting good data if we can’t hear what’s there !
Good birding to all!
Joan 










On Jul 12, 2019, at 4:05 PM, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:

Re Yellow Warblers: In previous years I have had them show up in my Solvang yard in summer, post-breeding. This year, though, I have heard them throughout spring, suggesting they might be breeding nearby. So my question is: did other people have spring Yellow Warblers at locations where they are typically missing during the breeding season?

Wim 

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 2:57 PM Nick Lethaby via Groups.Io <nlethaby=ti.com@groups.io> wrote:

All,

 

A couple of years ago, Dave Compton pointed that he was finding Yellow Warblers summering/breeding in odd habitats. Despite the refresh our wetlands have gotten this last winter, this habit seems to be persisting. I have had two birds singing all summer in eucalyptus and pepper trees along Cathedral Oaks just west of Winchester Canyon. There has been one bird in this area for 3 years now. I also had a Yellow Warbler at Alice Keck Park Memorial Gardens today. I would be interested if anyone else is seeing this.

 

Regards,

 

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

Re: What's this call?

Marissa DeVille
 
Edited

Hello Bryan,
From my findings. I believe that the calls you are hearing are from two Spotted Towhee. This would make sense because they are birds that are commonly found in shrubs/bushes. Spotted Towhees also have rufous sides...I am not the right person to confirm this, but I think Spotted Towhee and Rufous-Sided Towhee are very similar or might be the same bird with a name change. But again I do not have the right credentials to confirm that, it is just something I have heard.

To look up the call I used to Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Merlin app. I listened to the first call listed after the first three songs.
 
I hope this helps!

Marissa DeVille, Goleta at UCSB (currently in Rescue, CA).

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 5:32 PM Bryan Mumford <ng1@...> wrote:
I will attach a recording of two birds exchanging greetings. Any idea what they are? My wife says Rufous-sided Towhee, but I don’t hear this call in the samples I’ve been able to find online.

The birds are hidden in a bush and have this conversation with each other every evening at dusk.

- Bryan Mumford, near the San Marcos Preserve in Santa Barbara




Re: Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Marge and Don Thornton
 

We would like to thank those who let us know that our Nuttall's Woodpecker was just a juvenile.  The picture of a juvenile in our old Sibleys did not show the red so far forward.  Thanks again.

By the way, we noticed a pair of White-tailed Kites attacking a Red-shouldered Hawk as it flew by the windmill behind the Stow House.  There may be a nest in that area.

Marge and Don Thornton
Goleta, Ca.

What's this call?

Bryan Mumford
 

I will attach a recording of two birds exchanging greetings. Any idea what they are? My wife says Rufous-sided Towhee, but I don’t hear this call in the samples I’ve been able to find online.

The birds are hidden in a bush and have this conversation with each other every evening at dusk.

- Bryan Mumford, near the San Marcos Preserve in Santa Barbara




Re: Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Mark Holmgren
 

Hi Marge and Don,
You have a juvenile Nuttall's Woodpecker.  If you also witnessed a connection to an adult (being fed by it, being closely tended by it, begging from it), you have documented a breeding event.
The juveniles of most local black and white woodpeckers show a forward dullish red patch on the crown and forecrown.  You can also notice the very fresh, very uniformly fresh, lax plumage of your bird.  Adult feathers are frayed, sometimes dirty, and often not as lustrous and fluffy as the plumage of their offspring.
This breeding period when fledglings are associated with parents--from May through late July--is wonderful because we can distinguish fresh young birds from worn and frayed adults. (By late July and August many adults begin their annual molt and by Sept they too look fresh and in many species they are barely distinguishable from youngins.) Along with recognition of the plumage differences between the sexes, we can look at a situation in the field between May through late July and interpret the behaviours and ecological roles of breeding birds.  This is what all of you who contribute to the Breeding Bird Study do.

Most grateful,

Mark Holmgren and Adrian O'Loghlen
Goleta

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 1:51 PM Marge and Don Thornton via Groups.Io <thorntonmlt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
While birding Los Carneros, this morning we came across a Nuttall's Woodpecker that had a red crown very far forward on its head. This lead us to wonder if it was possibly a hybrid with a Ladder-backed Woodpecker.   Our ebird checklist has a photo.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58126201

Marge and Don Thornton
Goleta, Ca

Re: Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Adam Lewis (sbfledgling)
 

I had a juvy Nutall's yard bird exactly 2 years ago just like this. I live about a hundred yards north of the Stow House.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/sbfledgling/35818221052/in/album-72157683637332614/lightbox/ and
https://www.flickr.com/photos/sbfledgling/35818220732/in/album-72157683637332614/lightbox/

Adam lewis
Goleta

-----Original Message-----
From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io <main@sbcobirding.groups.io> On Behalf Of Joe Morlan
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2019 2:30 PM
To: thorntonmlt@...
Cc: main@sbcobirding.groups.io
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Marge & Don,

We have a similar bird coming to our suet. I think it's a juvenile Nuttall's.

On Fri, 12 Jul 2019 13:51:53 -0700, "Marge and Don Thornton via Groups.Io"
<thorntonmlt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

While birding Los Carneros, this morning we came across a Nuttall's Woodpecker that had a red crown very far forward on its head. This lead us to wonder if it was possibly a hybrid with a Ladder-backed Woodpecker. Our ebird checklist has a photo.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58126201

Marge and Don Thornton
Goleta, Ca

--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

Re: Yellow warblers in odd spots

Wim van Dam
 

Re Yellow Warblers: In previous years I have had them show up in my Solvang yard in summer, post-breeding. This year, though, I have heard them throughout spring, suggesting they might be breeding nearby. So my question is: did other people have spring Yellow Warblers at locations where they are typically missing during the breeding season?

Wim 

On Fri, Jul 12, 2019 at 2:57 PM Nick Lethaby via Groups.Io <nlethaby=ti.com@groups.io> wrote:

All,

 

A couple of years ago, Dave Compton pointed that he was finding Yellow Warblers summering/breeding in odd habitats. Despite the refresh our wetlands have gotten this last winter, this habit seems to be persisting. I have had two birds singing all summer in eucalyptus and pepper trees along Cathedral Oaks just west of Winchester Canyon. There has been one bird in this area for 3 years now. I also had a Yellow Warbler at Alice Keck Park Memorial Gardens today. I would be interested if anyone else is seeing this.

 

Regards,

 

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Blue-winged Teal (2 reports)
- Neotropic Cormorant (5 reports)
- Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (1)
- Reported Jul 11, 2019 17:30 by Gary Byerly
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58118942
- Comments: "Continuing male"

Blue-winged Teal (Spatula discors) (1)
- Reported Jul 11, 2019 17:30 by Benjamin Byerly
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58112074
- Comments: "Continuing male"

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1)
- Reported Jul 12, 2019 07:22 by Glenn Kincaid
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58122390
- Comments: "Sitting on usual perch next to DC Cormorant, then chased off by Cooper's hawk."

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1)
- Reported Jul 11, 2019 17:30 by Gary Byerly
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58118942
- Comments: "Continuing near half bridge "

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1)
- Reported Jul 11, 2019 17:30 by Benjamin Byerly
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58112074
- Comments: "Continuing near half bridge "

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 11, 2019 11:00 by Joan Lentz
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58106409
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird, although I hadn't observed it at its usual perch: a dead snag of Eucalyptus that overhangs the slough down at the south end of Devereux. You can easily see it by parking at the "bridge to nowhere" parking spot. Even this close to the bird, if you aren't aware of its small size, you might pass it off as another "double-crested cormorant". The photos aren't especially good, but you can see the faint white outline around the orange in the lower mandible area, although not well. No orange in he loral area, the way a Double-crest would have. Long tail is noticeable immediately, especially when perched in a tree like this, not so easily seen when the bird is on a log in the water."

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 11, 2019 10:20 by margeNdon thornton
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58106413
- Media: 1 Photo

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Jul 12, 2019 06:38 by Glenn Kincaid
- UCSB North Campus Open Space (formerly Ocean Meadows Golf Course), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.421439,-119.8713662&ll=34.421439,-119.8713662
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58117948
- Comments: "Immature, recently reported in the area. At western bridge. Flew in from North, landed breifly, then flew off towards Devereux Slough. Appeared taller and lankier than nearby immature Black-crowned Night-heron, with darker and more stout bill."

***********

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Yellow warblers in odd spots

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

All,

 

A couple of years ago, Dave Compton pointed that he was finding Yellow Warblers summering/breeding in odd habitats. Despite the refresh our wetlands have gotten this last winter, this habit seems to be persisting. I have had two birds singing all summer in eucalyptus and pepper trees along Cathedral Oaks just west of Winchester Canyon. There has been one bird in this area for 3 years now. I also had a Yellow Warbler at Alice Keck Park Memorial Gardens today. I would be interested if anyone else is seeing this.

 

Regards,

 

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

Although I haven’t checked any books, I would agree with Joe Morlan. A number of species (Great Spotted and Hairy Woodpecker, for example) have juveniles that show red/yellow coloration that reaches more forward on the crown than adults. I am thinking Nuttall’s might be similar in this respect.

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Marge and Don Thornton via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2019 1:52 PM
To: main@sbcobirding.groups.io
Cc: main@sbcobirding.groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

 

While birding Los Carneros, this morning we came across a Nuttall's Woodpecker that had a red crown very far forward on its head. This lead us to wonder if it was possibly a hybrid with a Ladder-backed Woodpecker.   Our ebird checklist has a photo.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58126201

Marge and Don Thornton
Goleta, Ca


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Re: Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Joe Morlan
 

Marge & Don,

We have a similar bird coming to our suet. I think it's a juvenile
Nuttall's.

On Fri, 12 Jul 2019 13:51:53 -0700, "Marge and Don Thornton via Groups.Io"
<thorntonmlt=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

While birding Los Carneros, this morning we came across a Nuttall's Woodpecker that had a red crown very far forward on its head. This lead us to wonder if it was possibly a hybrid with a Ladder-backed Woodpecker.   Our ebird checklist has a photo.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58126201

Marge and Don Thornton
Goleta, Ca

--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

Neotropic Cormorant

Joan Lentz <joanlentz@...>
 

Hi all:
My friend and former SB resident, Jon Dunn, will be visiting Saturday night. He would like to see the Neotropic Cormorant on Sunday morning. If any of you happen to see the bird AWAY from its usual perch in the Eucalyptus trees at the the south end of Devereux, please let me know. Otherwise, this could be one of the easiest county birds he ever gets!
Thanks to all,

Good birding!
Joan Lentz

Unusual Nuttall's Woodpecker

Marge and Don Thornton
 

While birding Los Carneros, this morning we came across a Nuttall's Woodpecker that had a red crown very far forward on its head. This lead us to wonder if it was possibly a hybrid with a Ladder-backed Woodpecker.   Our ebird checklist has a photo.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58126201

Marge and Don Thornton
Goleta, Ca

Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Rincon Creek this morning

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

Wow. That's a great find on the chickadees.

On Jul 11, 2019 6:24 PM, Mark Holmgren <maholmgren33@...> wrote:
My friend from Oregon, Dave Haupt, has been going afield with me for the last few days.  We had a nice day walking the bottom of Rincon Creek this morning where we birded 0.1 mile downstream of the Bates bridge (in blue on the attached aerial photo) and 0.57 miles upstream of the Bates bridge (in red). Two checklists resulted.  We did not distinguish birds seen in SB vs Ventura county.

We found a single silent Swainson's Thrush 45 meters downstream of the Bates Rd bridge and a Yellow-breasted Chat about 1/3 mile upstream of the bridge.  No Wilson's Warblers were detected.  These three species are old denizens (like in the 1980s to the early 2000s) of this section of Rincon Creek.

Other highlights include: Western Wood-Pewees (7 total in 2 downstream territories, and 5 individuals in 4 territories upstream).  Chestnut-backed Chickadees were well-entrenched both downstream and upstream of the Bates bridge. As many as 12 were seen in 5 distinct areas. 

In relatively short supply were Yellow Warbler (5 total), Warbling Vireo (2 or 4 total upstream only), and Bullock's Oriole (1 family).

 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58096559.   downstream of Bates bridge

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58107230.   upstream of Bates bridge

Mark Holmgren
San Marcos Pass


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA