Date   
Re: North Campus OS monthly bird survey

Conor McMahon
 

To anyone who's interested, here's my personal list from the western half of the survey - the official compiler might have slightly more number-perfect counts of some species that I estimated. It definitely was a great survey!


I also went up to check on the Pismo Tern/Jaeger/Gull fest this evening a bit before sunset - still lots of Arctic Terns, Sabine's Gulls, and Parasitic Jaegers around, but apparently (according to local birders I met) markedly fewer than there have been the last several days. Still a pretty cool sight! The beach faces west though so the light is probably a lot better in the morning.

- Conor


On Thu, Sep 12, 2019 at 5:43 PM Mark Holmgren <maholmgren33@...> wrote:

 Kind of an awesome survey at NCOS this morning. The egrets (80 Snowy, 38 Great) decided to harvest the fishes here this morning, but I know there were others on Devereux Slough as well. We need simultaneous coverage. The Devereux Slough survey is tomorrow at about 11:15am.  If someone was able to cover NCOS starting around then, I think we’d come up with some very high cumulative totals. I feel like we’re beginning to realize the benefits to fish and birds of a larger, grander, more diverse ‘Greater Devereux Ecosystem’ than what we had with lower Devereux alone.


But it’s not just egrets. We carefully counted 172 Semipalmated Plovers.   Among those were 8 Snowy Plovers, 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 88 Killdeer, and smaller numbers of Red-necked Phalaropes and a score of peeps. Other migrants included Willow Flycatcher, Sora and Virginia Rail, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Northern Pintail, Savannah Sparrows, and more.


My results for only the eastern half of NCOS are here:


Mark Holmgren 

Santa Barbara


Refugio Blackpoll - a few photo's

Peter Schneekloth
 

If of interest a few photos of the Blackpoll Warbler found at Refugio St Beach this morning. Seems to be missing most of its tail.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/48725693897/in/dateposted-public/

Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Lesser Nighthawk (1 report)
- Greater Yellowlegs (3 reports)
- Worm-eating Warbler (3 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Lesser Nighthawk (Chordeiles acutipennis) (2)
- Reported Sep 11, 2019 18:30 by Anonymous eBirder
- Quatal Canyon (SBA Co.), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.819282,-119.4588733&ll=34.819282,-119.4588733
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59701896
- Comments: "Continuing. Presumably the very last birds waiting to begin migration"

Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) (1)
- Reported Sep 11, 2019 11:37 by Karen Seward
- Santa Cruz Island--Prisoners Harbor, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.0187319,-119.6821404&ll=34.0187319,-119.6821404
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59701972
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Hanging out on beach and in marsh. Large wader with long slightly upturned bill, long yellow legs, all white belly, back wings and chest mottled white black and gray. White rump in flight. Call a very loud emphatic tew tew tew! "

Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) (1)
- Reported Sep 11, 2019 11:37 by Diane Bricmont
- Santa Cruz Island--Prisoners Harbor, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.0187319,-119.6821404&ll=34.0187319,-119.6821404
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59702033
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Hanging out on beach and in marsh. Large wader with long slightly upturned bill, long yellow legs, all white belly, back wings and chest mottled white black and gray. White rump in flight. Call a very loud emphatic tew tew tew!"

Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) (1)
- Reported Sep 11, 2019 11:37 by deborah grimes
- Santa Cruz Island--Prisoners Harbor, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.0187319,-119.6821404&ll=34.0187319,-119.6821404
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59702296
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Hanging out on beach and in marsh. Large wader with long slightly upturned bill, long yellow legs, all white belly, back wings and chest mottled white black and gray. White rump in flight. Call a very loud emphatic tew tew tew!"

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 12, 2019 09:05 by Elaine Tan
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59710383
- Comments: "Continuing since Nick Lethaby found it Sep 5, description and photos TBA"

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 12, 2019 08:40 by Pete Wolf
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59710402
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "(34.423094, -119.886368) Continuing... flew up from the ground... hung around in the trees on the West side of the path heading North (about 30-40 ft from fork) for several minutes then disappeared again... I waited a little while to see if I could get a better picture but it did not re-appear. Distinct striping on head and through eye."

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 12, 2019 08:10 by margeNdon thornton
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59712490
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "active in the mid canopy , light colored somewhat gray on back, buffy throat and breast, smudgy white behind the pink legs"

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North Campus OS monthly bird survey

Mark Holmgren
 

 Kind of an awesome survey at NCOS this morning. The egrets (80 Snowy, 38 Great) decided to harvest the fishes here this morning, but I know there were others on Devereux Slough as well. We need simultaneous coverage. The Devereux Slough survey is tomorrow at about 11:15am.  If someone was able to cover NCOS starting around then, I think we’d come up with some very high cumulative totals. I feel like we’re beginning to realize the benefits to fish and birds of a larger, grander, more diverse ‘Greater Devereux Ecosystem’ than what we had with lower Devereux alone.


But it’s not just egrets. We carefully counted 172 Semipalmated Plovers.   Among those were 8 Snowy Plovers, 2 Pectoral Sandpipers, 88 Killdeer, and smaller numbers of Red-necked Phalaropes and a score of peeps. Other migrants included Willow Flycatcher, Sora and Virginia Rail, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Northern Pintail, Savannah Sparrows, and more.


My results for only the eastern half of NCOS are here:


Mark Holmgren 

Santa Barbara


Worm-eating Warbler at Coronado Seep

Mark Bright
 

After seeing the Worm-eating Warbler for a few seconds at its usual location with several other birders it was not seen for about half an hour. Leaving the site I was then with Ken Pearlman at the seep location at the end of Coronado Drive when the Worm-eating Warbler made a quick appearance there. I hastily took several photos under poor lighting. The photos were soon reviewed by Adrian and then later confirmed by Mark Holmgren to be the Worm-eating Warbler. So another location where it may turn up.

Mark Bright
Santa Barbara 

Refugio Blackpoll Warbler

Peter Schneekloth
 

a Blackpoll Warbler in the big euc adjacent to stone wall just inside park. Many other new arrivals of common western migrants so will scan for others.

Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

Worm-eating Warbler

Florence Sanchez
 

The elusive Worm-eating Warbler showed itself this morning off the path where it has been seen previously in the Ellwood area.  It was actively feeding at mid-level among the dried leaves in a eucalyptus tree for several minutes before it dropped down.  It did not come back up again during the remaining time I was there.

(To get to this location, take the path at the end of Ellwood Beach road down to the big bulkhead and follow the main trail to the right (west). Just past another bulkhead, a narrow trail branches off to the right.  It dead ends at another bulkhead.  The Warbler was just a short way down this trail today.)

Florence Sanchez

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Greater Yellowlegs (1 report)
- Worm-eating Warbler (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) (1)
- Reported Sep 11, 2019 11:37 by Michael Hilchey
- Santa Cruz Island--Prisoners Harbor, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.0187319,-119.6821404&ll=34.0187319,-119.6821404
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59700509
- Comments: "Hanging out on beach and in marsh. Large wader with long slightly upturned bill, long yellow legs, all white belly, back wings and chest mottled white black and gray. White rump in flight. Call a very loud emphatic tew tew tew! "

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 10, 2019 07:30 by Sangeet Khalsa
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59677738
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Went searching around the spot where the bird had been previously seen, as posted by J. Callender. Scoured the Eucs above and followed an OCWA, some bushtits, and a couple of PSFLs thinking it might be associating w/them. I found it a bit to the north, mid~canopy, hopping about, gleaning. Noted the buffy undersides, long pale bill, and eye/headstripes. Got a few decent (lucky) photos."

***********

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Red-breasted Nuthatch @ Refugio SB

Adrian O'Loghlen
 

Ken Pearlman and I saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch at Refugio SB this am (Wed). It was in the trees beside the stone bridge. 

Adrian O'Loghlen
Goleta

Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] A birding event not to be missed!

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

I just realized Mark already checked the SMRE and found nothing.

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Nick Lethaby via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 3:44 PM
To: Mark Holmgren; Sbcobirding
Cc: main@sbcobirding.groups.io
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] A birding event not to be missed!

 

Has anyone checked out the SMRE to see if there are birds here as well? I can confirm there are absolutely no terns at Ocean Beach Park from 2 visits in the last few days.

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Holmgren
Sent: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 3:39 PM
To: Sbcobirding
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] A birding event not to be missed!

 

Folks, you should check out this Arctic Tern, Sabine's Gull, and two species of Jaeger show off Pismo Beach.  I went up there today and spent an hour with Brad Schram scoping offshore.  This morning there were no groups on the shore, all were offshore.  But these and ample Sooty Shearwaters were at times quite close and 2 large flocks of Arctic Terns flew right over our heads.  I can't provide a better summary than what Brad sent to the San Luis Obispo bird line, so I paste that below.  I also attach a map showing where to park.  

Navigate to 35.12947  -120.63196, park, and follow the route on the map to where we scoped this morning.

Upon leaving SLO Co. I drove to the Santa Maria River Estuary to see if any aspect of this show was happening in northern SB County.  It was not.  There were oodles of Sooty Shearwaters offshore, however.

Thanks to Brad for this summary below.

 

Mark Holmgren

San Marcos Pass

     ~~.    ~~.    ~~.    ~~. 

From Brad Schram:

Subject: Morning At the Beach (Pismo/Oceano)

The spectacle of ARCTIC TERNS, SABINE'S GULLS, & jaegers continued this morning at Pismo.  I didn't try to count this morning, just spent the time enjoying the scene and watching/hoping for a rarity.  No luck on the rarity but enjoyed three hours observing the rare event.  Jaeger (predominantly Parasitic) tail-chases with Arctics was almost a constant, not uncommonly three or four jaegers chasing one Arctic with a fish.  Sabine's Gulls were likewise common, a flock of 15 plus was the largest flock, but a string of them trending up-coast could have included 50 or more birds.  Quite the scene.

Afternoon viewing from the sand at the end of Grand Avenue is probably the best vantage point.  Be prepared for strong wind, possibly blowing sand.  A 'scope is necessary for all but any flocks ashore or working the surf.

Working with my hundreds of photos from yesterday afternoon, combined with Curtis Marantz's count of terns on the beach, causes me to reflect on my tern species flock proportion estimates from yesterday morning.  I clearly over-estimated the number of Common Terns in proportion to Arctics yesterday.  Virtually every tern seen, and all photographed, yesterday afternoon were Arctics. Curtis 'scoped one flock on the beach, 125 birds, and saw five COMMON TERNS among them.  I only saw one for sure this morning. Working with my photos, surely the best chance in my lifetime to photograph multiple ages of Arctics at close range, shows an extensiveness of carpal barring on young birds that is bolder than I realized when watching the scene yesterday morning. I'm sure that some of the birds passing through the 'scope view yesterday, juvs with heavy carpal barring and darkish primaries, were in fact juv Arctics not given a critical evaluation.  Live and learn.

Photos will appear on my Flickr site sometime this evening.  I hope.

Brad Schram

 

 

 

 

  Arroyo Grande


--

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] A birding event not to be missed!

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

Has anyone checked out the SMRE to see if there are birds here as well? I can confirm there are absolutely no terns at Ocean Beach Park from 2 visits in the last few days.

 

From: main@sbcobirding.groups.io [mailto:main@sbcobirding.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Holmgren
Sent: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 3:39 PM
To: Sbcobirding
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] A birding event not to be missed!

 

Folks, you should check out this Arctic Tern, Sabine's Gull, and two species of Jaeger show off Pismo Beach.  I went up there today and spent an hour with Brad Schram scoping offshore.  This morning there were no groups on the shore, all were offshore.  But these and ample Sooty Shearwaters were at times quite close and 2 large flocks of Arctic Terns flew right over our heads.  I can't provide a better summary than what Brad sent to the San Luis Obispo bird line, so I paste that below.  I also attach a map showing where to park.  

Navigate to 35.12947  -120.63196, park, and follow the route on the map to where we scoped this morning.

Upon leaving SLO Co. I drove to the Santa Maria River Estuary to see if any aspect of this show was happening in northern SB County.  It was not.  There were oodles of Sooty Shearwaters offshore, however.

Thanks to Brad for this summary below.

 

Mark Holmgren

San Marcos Pass

     ~~.    ~~.    ~~.    ~~. 

From Brad Schram:

Subject: Morning At the Beach (Pismo/Oceano)

The spectacle of ARCTIC TERNS, SABINE'S GULLS, & jaegers continued this morning at Pismo.  I didn't try to count this morning, just spent the time enjoying the scene and watching/hoping for a rarity.  No luck on the rarity but enjoyed three hours observing the rare event.  Jaeger (predominantly Parasitic) tail-chases with Arctics was almost a constant, not uncommonly three or four jaegers chasing one Arctic with a fish.  Sabine's Gulls were likewise common, a flock of 15 plus was the largest flock, but a string of them trending up-coast could have included 50 or more birds.  Quite the scene.

Afternoon viewing from the sand at the end of Grand Avenue is probably the best vantage point.  Be prepared for strong wind, possibly blowing sand.  A 'scope is necessary for all but any flocks ashore or working the surf.

Working with my hundreds of photos from yesterday afternoon, combined with Curtis Marantz's count of terns on the beach, causes me to reflect on my tern species flock proportion estimates from yesterday morning.  I clearly over-estimated the number of Common Terns in proportion to Arctics yesterday.  Virtually every tern seen, and all photographed, yesterday afternoon were Arctics. Curtis 'scoped one flock on the beach, 125 birds, and saw five COMMON TERNS among them.  I only saw one for sure this morning. Working with my photos, surely the best chance in my lifetime to photograph multiple ages of Arctics at close range, shows an extensiveness of carpal barring on young birds that is bolder than I realized when watching the scene yesterday morning. I'm sure that some of the birds passing through the 'scope view yesterday, juvs with heavy carpal barring and darkish primaries, were in fact juv Arctics not given a critical evaluation.  Live and learn.

Photos will appear on my Flickr site sometime this evening.  I hope.

Brad Schram

 

 

 

 

  Arroyo Grande


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

A birding event not to be missed!

Mark Holmgren
 

Folks, you should check out this Arctic Tern, Sabine's Gull, and two species of Jaeger show off Pismo Beach.  I went up there today and spent an hour with Brad Schram scoping offshore.  This morning there were no groups on the shore, all were offshore.  But these and ample Sooty Shearwaters were at times quite close and 2 large flocks of Arctic Terns flew right over our heads.  I can't provide a better summary than what Brad sent to the San Luis Obispo bird line, so I paste that below.  I also attach a map showing where to park.  
Navigate to 35.12947  -120.63196, park, and follow the route on the map to where we scoped this morning.
Upon leaving SLO Co. I drove to the Santa Maria River Estuary to see if any aspect of this show was happening in northern SB County.  It was not.  There were oodles of Sooty Shearwaters offshore, however.
Thanks to Brad for this summary below.

Mark Holmgren
San Marcos Pass
     ~~.    ~~.    ~~.    ~~. 
From Brad Schram:
Subject: Morning At the Beach (Pismo/Oceano)

The spectacle of ARCTIC TERNS, SABINE'S GULLS, & jaegers continued this morning at Pismo.  I didn't try to count this morning, just spent the time enjoying the scene and watching/hoping for a rarity.  No luck on the rarity but enjoyed three hours observing the rare event.  Jaeger (predominantly Parasitic) tail-chases with Arctics was almost a constant, not uncommonly three or four jaegers chasing one Arctic with a fish.  Sabine's Gulls were likewise common, a flock of 15 plus was the largest flock, but a string of them trending up-coast could have included 50 or more birds.  Quite the scene.

Afternoon viewing from the sand at the end of Grand Avenue is probably the best vantage point.  Be prepared for strong wind, possibly blowing sand.  A 'scope is necessary for all but any flocks ashore or working the surf.

Working with my hundreds of photos from yesterday afternoon, combined with Curtis Marantz's count of terns on the beach, causes me to reflect on my tern species flock proportion estimates from yesterday morning.  I clearly over-estimated the number of Common Terns in proportion to Arctics yesterday.  Virtually every tern seen, and all photographed, yesterday afternoon were Arctics. Curtis 'scoped one flock on the beach, 125 birds, and saw five COMMON TERNS among them.  I only saw one for sure this morning. Working with my photos, surely the best chance in my lifetime to photograph multiple ages of Arctics at close range, shows an extensiveness of carpal barring on young birds that is bolder than I realized when watching the scene yesterday morning. I'm sure that some of the birds passing through the 'scope view yesterday, juvs with heavy carpal barring and darkish primaries, were in fact juv Arctics not given a critical evaluation.  Live and learn.

Photos will appear on my Flickr site sometime this evening.  I hope.

Brad Schram




 

  Arroyo Grande

Ellwood and Winchester 1

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

All,

 

I checked these before work this morning. Winchester 1 continues to have very low numbers with just two warblers, 3 Western Tanagers, and singles of both orioles. Ellwood had a good smattering of the common western warblers and Yellow Warbler numbers are picking up. The Worm-eating Warbler continued in the same area. A Western Wood-Pewee was also there.

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA  93117

USA

 

Email: nlethaby@...

Office: +1 805 562 5106

Mobile: +1 805 284 6200

 


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Lesser Nighthawk (1 report)
- Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (1 report)
- Worm-eating Warbler (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Lesser Nighthawk (Chordeiles acutipennis) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 09, 2019 19:30 by Anonymous eBirder
- New Cuyama WTP, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9519718,-119.6969408&ll=34.9519718,-119.6969408
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59652624
- Comments: "Over the main pond, which is the first time they have been seen there. Flying west to east"

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 09, 2019 16:32 by Betsy Mooney
- Goleta Beach Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4173939,-119.8280364&ll=34.4173939,-119.8280364
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59653829
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Observed by itself on opposite side of Goleta Slough. Brown overall with white streaking and tear-shaped spotting. Thick black bill."

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 07, 2019 09:40 by Curtis Marantz
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59650032
- Comments: "I arrived this morning about 15 minutes after others had seen this bird, yet more than two hours had elapsed before Jeff relocated the warbler as it moved along a eucalyptus branch over the narrow track to the north of its intersection with the main trail. Unfortunately, the warbler flew off after I had seen it for only a few seconds as a small, brownish bird that was creeping along the branch. I heard intermittent calls by this bird over the following half-hour, yet it took me almost two hours to see the bird amid the dense vegetation of a vine-covered tree along the riparian corridor 50 meters west of the trail from which the other observations had been made. The warbler spent several minutes in this tree, but the vegetation was so dense that it was difficult to see for extended periods of time, so I had it in view for no more than a minute in total. I lost track of the warbler for about a half-hour, before I again heard it call several times and I again saw it for a few seconds before it flew off to the east toward the trail and disappeared. The warbler was difficult to see and hard to follow because it was often hidden amid dense vegetation in which it worked clusters of live leaves and vine tangles as opposed to the dead leaves that it was visiting when initially seen in the eucalyptus. I located this bird by hearing its distinctive, yet easily overlooked, calls that I described as a thin “zeeeet” that was intermediate in quality between the buzzy, “zeeet” flight-call of a Yellow Warbler, and the clear, “seeet” of an Orange-crowned Warbler, but unlike the calls of these species, this bird called in series of twos or threes.
My views of this bird were more than sufficient to identify it with confidence, yet they were not overly satisfying, given that my best views of it were directly from below and in dense shade. I was nevertheless able to note that this was a small bird that seemed similar in size to the other warblers that were in the area, but also seemingly plumper overall, with a seemingly large head and a long bill, but little in the way of a neck. Further apparent from below was that the tail was relatively short, maybe comparable to the length of the body without the head and neck, broader than that of an Orange-crowned Warbler, and with a square tip. The long, tapered undertail-coverts reached about halfway out the tail. I never did see the wingtips, the primary projection, or the placement of the wingtips relative to the tail or undertail coverts.
Given my position below this bird, I saw its underparts far better than the upperparts. I was therefore able to see that the throat and breast were a rich buff to nearly cinnamon-buff in color and with any obvious markings. The belly was beige and unmarked, but the flanks were a little darker and more olive. The undertail coverts were about the same shade of beige as the belly, but they also had dusky brown centers to the various feathers that gave the undertail coverts a distinctly spotted appearance. The underside of the tail itself was uniformly dark, and seemingly olive-brown. I did not see paler corners to the tail or any suggestion of tail spots. My views of the head, upperparts, and wings were brief. I saw a relatively narrow, but sharply demarcated, postocular-stripe that was blackish if not truly black, and which was bordered above by a pale supercilium, but I did not clearly see the lateral crown-stripes or the median stripe when the bird was in the vine tangles. The wings were dark and not boldly marked, but I easily could have missed some subtle contrast, and I had only an impression that the wings were olive as opposed to brown. It was only when I saw the bird in the ash tree that I thought I saw a striped crown, but I was unable to make out any detail.
When seen from below, the underside of the bill appeared to be entirely flesh-colored, the eyes were dark, and the legs also appeared to be either pinkish or flesh colored."

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bt pigeon minutia

Don Tate
 

Tues 11 AM 600-700 blocks E. North St, Lompoc, band-tailed pigeons milling and wheeling and perching in big sycamores and utility wires. Counted 18 all in one view at one point, guessing roughly twice that were present.

Don Tate, Vandenberg Village

Goleta, Tuesday afternoon

Robert Lindsay
 

9/10, 1:00-3:00 pm

Spent an hour at the Coronado seep which was better than expected. It was never full of birds but things did come in at a steady pace. Species list below:
Hairy Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Scaly-breasted Munia
Song Sparrow
Oak Titmouse
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
Black Phoebe
Hooded Oriole (female)
Western Tanager
Black-headed Grosbeak (female)
Orange-crowned Warbler
Townsend's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Chestnut-backed Chickadee

Went to Goleta Sewage Plant next in the hopes of seeing an Ibis. One flew in as soon as I arrived. Other noteworthy birds included single Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, single Red-necked Phalarope, several Northern Shoveler, three Gadwall. Rest of the list below:
Black-necked Stilt
Spotted Sandpiper (1)
Western Sandpiper (2)
Killdeer
Western Gull
California Gull (3)
Mallard
Double-crested Cormorant
Black-crowned Night Heron

That's all,
Rob Lindsay

Elings Park South

Mark Bright
 

This morning from Elings Park South at the stone bench I saw a Merlin come in across the top of the hill like a bullet straight and fast from the west and about 10 feet above the ground. Several minutes later a White-tailed Kite was also foraging and kiting across the top of the hill.

Mark Bright
Santa Barbara

Andree Clark Bird Refuge 9/9/19

Dika Golovatchoff
 

I spent about 30 minutes yesterday evening observing birds from the 3rd platform.  I briefly saw a Sora poke out from reeds, also a Common Yellowthroat.  There were 3 Killdeer, 3 Dowitchers (I think short-billed) doing their sewing machine act but being chased by one or more Black-necked Stilts.  Also a Spotted Sandpiper and 3 Least Sandpipers.  Besides Mallards and Coots there were 7 Northern Shovelers, 3 Snowy Egrets and a few Great Egrets on one of the islands along with a Great Blue Heron and Black-crowned Night Heron.  A Red-necked Phalarope was doing its (spinning) swim.  I posted a couple of photos at https://www.flickr.com/photos/digolov/ and would appreciate a definitive ID on the Dowitcher flying away from Stilt.  Dika Golovatchoff, Santa Barbara

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[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (2 reports)

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Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (2)
- Reported Sep 09, 2019 14:25 by Margaret Lyons
- (34.398, -119.527), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.3983383,-119.5274572&ll=34.3983383,-119.5274572
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59647973

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported Sep 08, 2019 10:00 by Cole Diem
- Carpinteria Salt Marsh Nature Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.3961231,-119.5283666&ll=34.3961231,-119.5283666
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59645722
- Comments: "Immature bird, very distinct from both adult and young Black-crowned Night Heron."

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[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Cackling Goose (1 report)
- Common Ground Dove (1 report)
- Worm-eating Warbler (2 reports)
- Lucy's Warbler (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Cackling Goose (Branta hutchinsii) (1)
- Reported Sep 08, 2019 08:30 by Kurt Wahl
- Waller Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9029675,-120.4392958&ll=34.9029675,-120.4392958
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59615014
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "very very small goose, short bill, white necklace"

Common Ground Dove (Columbina passerina) (1)
- Reported Sep 08, 2019 06:36 by John Callender
- Carpinteria Creek, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.3930006,-119.5140259&ll=34.3930006,-119.5140259
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59614855
- Comments: "Distinctive series of single, ascending hoots heard to the south from near (34.4009608, -119.4919989)."

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 07, 2019 16:09 by John Callender
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59595409
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird found by Nick Lethaby. Seen briefly and photographed near the same location it was previously seen (34.423044, -119.886429). I observed the bird first through binoculars as it foraged in a eucalyptus about 50 feet directly overhead. My initial impression was of a compact, short-tailed warbler that was on the sluggish side. The tail was dark. The cream-colored belly blended into a darkish yellow (caramel/mustard-colored) breast and throat. As I followed the bird through the foliage I got a brief flash of a strong pattern that I thought might be the bold striping on the head. At that point I switched to my camera, and got a few shots before the bird (which was loosely associating with a mixed flock that included an Orange-crowned Warbler and two Blue-gray Gnatcatchers) flew into the larger eucalyptus trees immediately to the east, where I lost it. Photos show dark smudging on the undertail coverts, a buffy/mustard-colored throat, a sharply pointed beak, and a hint of a dark eye stripe."

Worm-eating Warbler (Helmitheros vermivorum) (1)
- Reported Sep 07, 2019 09:21 by Libby Patten
- Coronado Dr.--south end (Goleta Monarch Grove), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4232079,-119.8898008&ll=34.4232079,-119.8898008
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59598083
- Comments: "Found originally by Nick Lethaby and refound by Bill Murdoch and others. Seen halfway up a tall tree on the short dead-end trail which heads north from the ‘willow trail’ which starts just west of the end of Ellwood Beach Drive. Got a decent short look from below. Warbler with light buff-colored underside and clear black line through its eye. Didn’t get clear view of its crown. At one point it flew to a different tree and sang its high-pitched trill song once. Unmistakable. Then flew behind us and not refound while I was there. "

Lucy's Warbler (Leiothlypis luciae) (1)
- Reported Sep 08, 2019 12:07 by Mark Holmgren
- Refugio SB, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4643601,-120.0694835&ll=34.4643601,-120.0694835
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59626340
- Comments: "Small, dull-gray warbler foraging with Bushtits in Schinus molle near the park entrance. Pale gray below, gray head, gray mantle. Winds darker than body. Short tail. Black eye against dull gray face. The breast looked dingy compared to the rest of the underparts, and my first thought when I saw this was that the bird was a Virginia's Warbler, as I interpreted this off color area as being yellow. But a longer look revealed that it was NOT yellow. Also, the under tail coverts were clearly grayish white, and the bird did not have a prominent eye ring. I did not get a look at the rump."

Lucy's Warbler (Leiothlypis luciae) (1)
- Reported Sep 08, 2019 12:07 by David Compton
- Refugio SB, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4643601,-120.0694835&ll=34.4643601,-120.0694835
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59624367
- Comments: "Small, dull-gray warbler foraging with Bushtits in Schinus molle near the park entrance. Pale gray below, gray head, gray mantle. Winds darker than body. Short tail. Black eye against dull gray face. The breast looked dingy compared to the rest of the underparts, and my first thought when I saw this was that the bird was a Virginia's Warbler, as I interpreted this off color area as being yellow. But a longer look revealed that it was NOT yellow. Also, the under tail coverts were clearly grayish white, and the bird did not have a prominent eye ring. I did not get a look at the rump."

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