Date   

Re: Semi-P Sands

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

Late posting to add to this--I was at the Sewage Treatment plant on Monday and saw at
least 60 peeps, about half & half Western and Least. Missed the Semi-palmated
Sandpiper on Monday, but I didn't have my scope. There were at least 6 Semi-palmated
Plovers there on Monday, along with a like number of Dowitchers (all apparently
Long-billed from the calls) and Stilts, 2 Spotted Sandpipers, 1 Greater Yellowlegs, 1
Wilson's Phalarope, and 2-3 Kildeer. Lots of mottled, molting Mallards in the deeper
pond, with a few ducklings of various ages.

Florence Sanchez


"Lethaby, Nick" wrote:

All:

Checked Goleta Sewage ponds quickly and there are now 3 juvenile
Semi-palmated Sandpipers. As typical for this time, there are as many juv
Semi-Ps as juv Westerns. There were also 8 Semi-palmated Plovers, 4 Wilson's
Phalaropes, and a Spotted Sandpiper in addition to the 50+ peeps. No
yellowlegs or dowitchers - missed these last week as well.

Nick




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Semi-P Sands

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

All:

Checked Goleta Sewage ponds quickly and there are now 3 juvenile
Semi-palmated Sandpipers. As typical for this time, there are as many juv
Semi-Ps as juv Westerns. There were also 8 Semi-palmated Plovers, 4 Wilson's
Phalaropes, and a Spotted Sandpiper in addition to the 50+ peeps. No
yellowlegs or dowitchers - missed these last week as well.

Nick


Miguelito Park Phainopeplas

Bruce & Cher Hollingworth <hollingw@...>
 

At Miguelito Park this morning, we saw a flock of at least four phainopeplas feeding on berry bushes around the parking lot strip across the street, then flying in and around the oaks in the park. There were just a couple Band-tailed Pigeons in the park, not more than three or four. We also watched Orange-crowned and Wilson's Warblers, and several Hooded Orioles.

Cher


Semipalmated Sandpiper

Peter Gaede
 

S.B. Birders:

At the Goleta Sewage ponds this morning, there was a single SEMIPALMATED
SANDPIPER in a flock of Least and Westerns. The best habitat seems to be in
the center pond, and this was where the majority of the peeps were hanging
out. Wes Fritz and I saw the bird around 10am, and Wes reports two
individuals (Semi's) present yesterday. At about 10:15, a PEREGRINE FALCON
swooped in and caused quite a stir. The peeps grouped together and flew
erratically around the ponds, a few of which evaded their demise by a short
distance on several occasions. After the falcon left, they settled down on
the southern most pond, where there was slightly more cover.

This past Sunday (7/28), a WANDERING TATTLER was at the end of the jetty
near the Santa Barbara Harbor at the end of Castillo street.

Peter Gaede


recent birds

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

All:

Last Thursday, saw an adult Least Tern off Coal Oil Point. On Saturday, I
had a Dipper up on San Ysidro Creek. It was in a pool below a small
waterfall (about 4-5 feet high) that was a few hundred yards downstream of
the first stream crossing on the trail and upstream of the large swimming
hole.

Missed the Caracara on Sunday at VAFB, but looking to forward to birding the
ponds this fall for the first time.

Nick Lethaby
DSP/BIOS Product Manager
Texas Instruments
805 562 5106
nlethaby@ti.com


Name changes

jlsanford2002 <jacksanford@...>
 

Thanks to Jamie I found out that David Sibley's book has several
corrections that I was unaware of. The most important two are:Northern
Caracara should read Crested Caracara and the other one changes the
American Magpie back to Black-billed Magpie. The author anticipated
these name changes however they did not occur.


summer Cattle Egrets, breeding cormorants and Great Egrets

Dave Compton <davcompton@...>
 

Seven CATTLE EGRETS in breeding plumage at the bird refuge in Santa Barbara
this morning were an unusual summer find for the county. Also at the bird
refuge were at least five nests with large DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT young.
These birds were actually on the zoo property and visible from the west end
of the refuge.

At Goleta Beach, the two large GREAT EGRET nestlings are hopping around out
of the nest abit and are spreading their wings alot. Their flight feathers
appear to be all grown in, but the feathers of the wing linings are not.
'Don't know if this would be a factor in when they finally take that first
flight. They do seem to be looking down alot and are obviously more curious
about their surroundings, pulling and poking at branches in the tree.

Dave Compton


Re: Caracara

Jamie Chavez <jc.wings@...>
 

Jack,

David Sibley "changed" the name of Crested Caracara to Northern Caracara
anticipating a name change by the American Ornithologists Union (AOU) which
apparently didn't happen. He later reversed this in subsequent printings of
his guide. See the link below if interested.

http://www.sibleyart.com/updates.htm

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria

----- Original Message -----
From: "jlsanford2002" <jacksanford@hotmail.com>
To: <sbcobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2002 8:30 AM
Subject: [sbcobirding] Caracara


Hi Everyone, I was very interested in the Crested Caracara and the
Northern Caracara. I looked in all my bird books and even in my
latest book (Birds of Noth American - Smithsonian Handbooks -copyright
2001) the Caracara is listed as the Crested Caracara. I then chacked
out Sibley's "Guide to Birds copyright 2000 " and sure enought he has
it listed as the Northern Caracara and has a footnote at the bottom of
the page and the last sentence reads: " Northern Caracara was formerly
known as Crested Caracara. Now I would like to see one. Good Birding
Jack


For the shorebird starved

Dave Compton <davcompton@...>
 

For those of you who just don't want to give up on shorebirds in Santa
Barbara County this fall, Devereux Slough and the Goleta sewage plant may be
your best bets among accessible places at the moment. Goleta sewage had
about 90 peeps (slight majority Western) yesterday, plus 10 or so dowitchers
(both species), Greater Yellowlegs, and a Semipalmated Plover, in addition
to the usual stilts and Killdeer. Devereux has had in the neighborhood of 60
peeps over the last couple of days, along with good numbers of Semipalm
Plovers. A flock of about 50 Black-bellied Plovers (with one dowitcher in
the middle) was present yesterday afternoon, while a Wilson's Phalarope was
there this morning.

Nothing exciting at the moment, but it's still early.

Incidentally, Haskell's Beach, between the Baccara Resort and Sandpiper Golf
Course, had nothing of interest this morning--at Bell Canyon estuary, on the
beach, on the ocean, or on the old pier remnant.

Dave Compton


Caracara

jlsanford2002 <jacksanford@...>
 

Hi Everyone, I was very interested in the Crested Caracara and the
Northern Caracara. I looked in all my bird books and even in my
latest book (Birds of Noth American - Smithsonian Handbooks -copyright
2001) the Caracara is listed as the Crested Caracara. I then chacked
out Sibley's "Guide to Birds copyright 2000 " and sure enought he has
it listed as the Northern Caracara and has a footnote at the bottom of
the page and the last sentence reads: " Northern Caracara was formerly
known as Crested Caracara. Now I would like to see one. Good Birding
Jack


BIRDWEST; Santa Barbara, CA; 7/26/02

Guy Tingos <guy.tingos@...>
 

- RBA
* California
* Santa Barbara
* July 26, 2002
* CASB0207.26
- Birds mentioned

Crested Caracara
Black Oystercatcher
Surfbird

- Transcript

This is the Santa Barbara Audubon Society's rare bird report being recorded on
Friday, July 26 at 2:30 p.m. If you have a rare bird sighting to report, call Karen
Bridgers at 964-1316. For those of you who are getting the transcript on the
Internet, the rare bird alert number for Santa Barbara is (805) 964-8240.

At Campus Point, on the UCSB campus, a BLACK OYSTERCATCHER was present on Sunday the
21st, along with two SURFBIRDS and Black and Ruddy Turnstones.

The Goleta Sewage Plant still has a few shorebirds this week, in the habitat in the
middle pond, but it looks as though all the plants and sludge will soon be cut.
Please remember to sign in at the office before proceeding into the plant to bird.

In the North County, check in at the office of the Santa Maria Sewage Plant on Black
Road to bird. Good numbers of shorebirds have been here this week.

The CRESTED CARACARA, found on the 14th on north Vandenberg Air Force Base, was still
present on the 23rd.. It was last seen in the field west of 13th Street and about 300
meters east of the Waterfowl Natural Resources Area, commonly called "the ponds." Due
to questions about its origins, the Crested Caracara is not a countable bird in
California, but it is an interesting sighting. Bear in mind that Vandenberg is
generally off-limits to civilians (including birders), but that the Waterfowl Natural
Resources Area, called "the ponds" by the locals, has recently opened again for
birding after being off-limits since 9/11. For entry, call the Fish and Wildlife
Office on the base at 805-606-6804 to request a pass. You must call at least 24 hours
prior to your visit on weekdays, 48 hours prior to your visit on weekends.

That is all the bird news for now, but, again, if you have a rare sighting to report,
call Karen Bridgers at 964-1316. Good birding in Santa Barbara County.

- End transcript


Re: Northern Caracara seen again at VAFB

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

All:

I haven't gotten around yet to looking for the Caracara. Do you need special
permission to get into the base or is it publically accessible?

Thanks, Nick

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Holmgren [mailto:maholmgren@yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2002 4:30 PM
To: SBCo Birding
Subject: [sbcobirding] Northern Caracara seen again at VAFB



From 4pm till at least 4:15 pm Dave Compton watched the Northern Caracara on
North VAFB in the field immediately W of 13th Street and approx 300m E of
the Waterfowl Ponds. A pair of Common Ravens were also present. Dave said
that the caracara was standing in the field, hopping around a bit.


Mark Holmgren, Vice President
San Marcos Foothills Coalition
www.sanmarcosfoothills.org


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Caracara, natural occurence?

esq180517mb <gavkbrown@...>
 

In a 1993 California Bird Records Committee report there is a good
discussion of Caracaras in California. "The Committee believes that
caracaras seen near coastal cities are all escapees," One they
considered coastal and near a city was a caracara at Montano De Oro
in the 1960s. They did say that caracaras are not commonly kept in
zoos. I looked at the International Species Information Service
website (www.isis.org) and found only one caracara in a public
collection in California. That was The Living Desert in Palm Desert
California. But the bird collections of the San Diego Zoo are not in
the ISIS database. There was one in Tucson Arizona. SO if this bird
is an escapee it came from a private bird collector. Maybe we should
ask for legislation requiring private birds be banded or identified
in some way. I would think that a caracara would be worth something
you would think if someone lost one they would put an ad in a
newspaper?? Please ask all your friends if they lost a caracara.
Still it was fun to see one flying over the Santa Ynez river.
Mark Brown
Santa Maria
gavkbrown@sbceo.org


owlet

hrslvr77@...
 

Thank you to all that responded to my plea for help. Your advice was very
much needed and we appreciate it. We are currently doing our best to protect
it from the animals, and allowing Mom owl to feed and care for it. She is
quite protective during the late evening and through the night. Hopefully
he will learn to fly soon. We have contacted the Pacific Wildlife
Care....they are wonderful....We didn't realize such a friendly and willing
organization existed.

Thanks a bunch to all of you. I knew you would help us out.

Brooke


baby barn owl help

hrslvr77@...
 

Hi all
My neighbor called me this morning and said that a baby barn owl has fallen
out of the owl house. The mother has fed the baby the past two nights on the
ground and it must hide or move around during the day. This morning it was
perched on top of a trash can. It cannot fly. What should I tell her to do
with it. She is afraid her cats will attack it. Does somebody come out and
pick baby owls up? Or should I just tell her to let nature take its course.
Any advise would be helpful.
We live in Santa Maria.
Brooke


Northern Caracara seen again at VAFB

Mark Holmgren <maholmgren@...>
 

From 4pm till at least 4:15 pm Dave Compton watched the Northern Caracara on North VAFB in the field immediately W of 13th Street and approx 300m E of the Waterfowl Ponds. A pair of Common Ravens were also present. Dave said that the caracara was standing in the field, hopping around a bit.


Mark Holmgren, Vice President
San Marcos Foothills Coalition
www.sanmarcosfoothills.org


---------------------------------
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(No subject)

Mark Holmgren <maholmgren@...>
 

From 4pm till at least 4:15 pm Dave Compton watched the Northern Caracara on North VAFB in the field immediately W of 13th Street and approx 300m E of the Waterfowl Ponds. A pair of Common Ravens were also present. Dave said that the caracara was standing in the field, hopping around a bit.


Mark Holmgren, Vice President
San Marcos Foothills Coalition
www.sanmarcosfoothills.org


---------------------------------
Do You Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Health - Feel better, live better


Caracaras

Karen Bridgers
 

Hi all

I did a bit of research on the web about Crested Caracaras and their
distribution. There are actually records from Massachusetts, South Dakota,
and Wyoming -- but none of them were accepted. There is an interesting
report from a few years ago on the Audubon's Crested Caracara. It focuses on
the Florida population, but here is what it says about "Localized
Movements":

"Localized Movements
Caracaras are resident, diurnal, and nonmigratory. Adult caracaras may be
found in their home range year-round. Home ranges may encompass an area of
up to 2,389 ha with an average of 1,552 ha. There is no significant
difference between male and female home ranges; Humphrey and Morrison (1996)
found female home ranges from 3.8 to 24.9 km2 and male home ranges ranging
from 3.9 km2 to 22.5 km2. Occasionally large groups of individuals are
encountered (Layne 1978).
Oberholser (1974) attributes this to the birds� carrion feeding habit
although Morrison (University of Florida, personal communication 1996a) has
noted that juvenile caracaras are nomadic. This may account for the number
of sightings far outside the core area in Glades, Hendry, Okeechobee,
Osceola, and Highlands
counties. Occasional sightings have been reported in Polk, Orange, Indian
River, St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach, Monroe, and Charlotte counties. When
subadult birds are associated with one of the aggregation areas, the
aggregation areas are comprised of similar habitat to that found in the
natal territory."

You can read the whole report at
http://southeast.fws.gov/vbpdfs/species/birds/acca.pdf. It's 22 pages in
Adobe Acrobat format -- maybe more than you wanted to know!

I also checked the falconers' sites, and didn't find anything about
falconers using caracaras, however I did find some -- but not a lot --
instances where the birds were kept in captivity.

Anyway, it seems to me that the "nonmigratory" status of these birds is the
big issue.

For what it's worth...

Karen Bridgers


Re: Carcara question

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

There is also at least one Caracara record from OR I believe. I'd like to
understand exactly how many captive Caracaras there are in CA and elsewhere
is the west. There seem to be quite a few records so that would imply there
are a lot in captivity if they're all escapes. I guessing the CBRC has some
kind of analysis on this.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Compton [mailto:davcompton@earthlink.net]
Sent: Monday, July 22, 2002 9:39 PM
To: Bruce & Cher Hollingworth; sbcobirding
Subject: RE: [sbcobirding] Carcara question


No one else has jumped here, so I'll make a few comments on this issue,
since it's a very good question.

But first, I should say I'm not that knowledgeable about the habits of
caracaras or of the CBRC decisions in regard to this species (none of the
handful of records has been accepted).

I do know that there are a few important questions that you would have to
ask about the occurrence of a species like this. First: Does it have an
established pattern of vagrancy? If a bird has shown no tendency to wander
outside its range, that's a red flag for anyone trying to decide whether or
not its a true vagrant. Zone-tailed Hawk is an obviously migratory bird and
that at least supports the possibility of occurrence outside its usual
range.

The next question you'd have to ask is: Is this species' pattern of vagrancy
consistent with it occurring in the area. Of course even if it isn't, that
doesn't mean the bird isn't wild. As for the Vandenberg bird, it isn't the
first one seen in California. The handful of previous reports (at least
those I know about) are strewn about the state from north to south and from
coast to well inland. There isn't much of a pattern there at all, as far as
I can see. Zone-tailed Hawk, by contrast, has a pretty strong pattern, and
one that fits the the more usual patterns for vagrant birds, in terms of
both timing and geographical distribution. But again, that doesn't mean the
Vandenberg bird isn't wild, or that any of the other caracaras reported
before in California aren't.

No one can say absolutely for sure what the bird's origins are. If you ask
whether it's "countable," that may in the end be up to the person keeping
the list. That is, it just depends on your own criteria.

One other note. I think I said in an earlier post that previous Caracara
reports had not been accepted by the CBRC because of questionable origin.
But I see where a bird described in Imperial County in December 1993 was
rejected on the fourth round, 6-4, with three voting against because they
believed the bird was not well documented enough for a first state record.
The fourth person apparently cited questionable origin. That's certainly an
argument for documenting the Vandenberg bird as well as possible.

Dave Compton

-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce & Cher Hollingworth [mailto:hollingw@impulse.net]
Sent: Sunday, July 21, 2002 4:02 PM
To: sbcobirding
Subject: [sbcobirding] Carcara question


I had a question about why a Caracara would be more a questionable
"countable" than a Zone-tailed Hawk (an AZ bird, too). A falconer is much
more likely to use a Zone-tailed Hawk; we were watching a Harris's Hawk
(another AZ bird) working at the Renaissance Faire. Becky had called and
asked Lee Aulman if falconers use Caracaras. They don't, which we expected,
being a carrion eater. Also the bird is unbanded. A zoo would have banded
birds.






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migrating shorebirds at SM sewage

esq180517mb <gavkbrown@...>
 

Monday, July 22,I saw a flock of 15 juvenile Least Sandpipers in the
nutrient rich ponds in the front of the Santa Maria Sewage Plant. I
was unable to morph one into a stint. In the back ponds were 20+ Red-
necked Phalaropes, male and female breeding plumage, adult non
breeding and juveniles. There were dozens of breeding plumaged
Dowitchers, both species I am guessing. On Sunday I saw a breeding
plumage Greater Yellowlegs at the ponds at Highway 101 and the Santa
Maria River levee. A Belted Kingfisher also.
Mark Brown
Santa Maria