Date   
Carpinteria State Beach/Campground vagrants this morning

John Callender
 

The continuing Rusty Blackbird was bathing on a log in the Carpinteria Creek lagoon at 7:45 this morning (Thursday). It later flew into some myoporum in the campground just west of the lagoon.

I checked the gull flock on the beach just west of Linden avenue around the same time, but did not find the Laughing Gull previously seen there.

John Callender
Carpinteria

Re: Sedgwick Reserve (restricted access) - Weekly Survey, Sage Thrasher

Marge Erickson
 

Yes.  Closer to the farm, but pretty much in the same place.


On Wed, Nov 6, 2019 at 2:34 PM Mark Holmgren <maholmgren33@...> wrote:
Very handsome bird.  Where on the reserve was it?  Same place as previous years?
Mark

On Wed, Nov 6, 2019 at 2:17 PM Peter Schneekloth via Groups.Io <peterschneekloth=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The weekly survey at Sedgwick netted a total of 47 species (list here https://ebird.org/checklist/S61230285?share=true ) with the highlight a Sage Thrasher. The Sage Thrasher was originally spotted by Fred Emerson last Friday during docent training. The bird was refound today by Marge Ericson and seen by the group present. Other highlights were a Northern Harrier, American Goldfinch and a large flock of Western Meadowlark.

We are hoping the Thrasher will stick around for the Cachuma CBC on Dec 27th, a few looks at the bird here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/49025466508/in/dateposted-public/ 

Peter Schneekloth (for the entire Sedgwick Crew)
Buellton



--
Marge Erickson

Re: Sedgwick Reserve (restricted access) - Weekly Survey, Sage Thrasher

Mark Holmgren
 

Very handsome bird.  Where on the reserve was it?  Same place as previous years?
Mark

On Wed, Nov 6, 2019 at 2:17 PM Peter Schneekloth via Groups.Io <peterschneekloth=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
The weekly survey at Sedgwick netted a total of 47 species (list here https://ebird.org/checklist/S61230285?share=true ) with the highlight a Sage Thrasher. The Sage Thrasher was originally spotted by Fred Emerson last Friday during docent training. The bird was refound today by Marge Ericson and seen by the group present. Other highlights were a Northern Harrier, American Goldfinch and a large flock of Western Meadowlark.

We are hoping the Thrasher will stick around for the Cachuma CBC on Dec 27th, a few looks at the bird here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/49025466508/in/dateposted-public/ 

Peter Schneekloth (for the entire Sedgwick Crew)
Buellton

Sedgwick Reserve (restricted access) - Weekly Survey, Sage Thrasher

Peter Schneekloth
 

The weekly survey at Sedgwick netted a total of 47 species (list here https://ebird.org/checklist/S61230285?share=true ) with the highlight a Sage Thrasher. The Sage Thrasher was originally spotted by Fred Emerson last Friday during docent training. The bird was refound today by Marge Ericson and seen by the group present. Other highlights were a Northern Harrier, American Goldfinch and a large flock of Western Meadowlark.

We are hoping the Thrasher will stick around for the Cachuma CBC on Dec 27th, a few looks at the bird here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/49025466508/in/dateposted-public/ 

Peter Schneekloth (for the entire Sedgwick Crew)
Buellton

Re: Carpinteria Rusty Blackbird reports

John Callender
 

Tom Beland and Laurel Luby got great photos of the bird:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61214957

John Callender
Carpinteria

Re: Carpinteria Rusty Blackbird reports

Dave Compton
 

Hi again everyone,

I should acknowledge that my implied criticism of Ryan for his list was not particularly fair, and he even describes his route pretty well and acknowledges that he later realized there was a separate hotspot. So, apologies to Ryan, and a big thanks to him for finding a really good bird while he was in town. Ryan's list also described exactly where he found the blackbird, by the way.

My intended point, by the way, was that people should be mindful about including birds on an eBird checklist that are well outside the area the hotspot was intended to represent. An out-of-town birder, of course, will not necessarily have an easy time figuring out what area a hotspot is supposed to cover.

Dave Compton 


On Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 3:08 PM Dave Compton via Groups.Io <davcompton60=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
A Rusty Blackbird is being reported in Carpinteria today. It was first included in an eBird checklist for the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Nature Park, but the notes say the bird was actually at Carpinteria State Beach at the end of Linden.


So someone needs an eBird lesson there.

John Callendar subsequently refound the bird at the same location, with Brewer's Blackbirds, and watched it fly each to toward Carpinteria Creek lagoon. Note that Brewer's Blackbirds often hang out in the campground in this area.

I have not seen photos of the bird, so don't know if it's supposed to be a male or female.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

Re: Carpinteria Rusty Blackbird reports

John Callender
 

Oops. That link was to the original eBird list by Ryan O'Donnell. My eBird list is here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61212449

John Callender
Carpinteria

Re: Carpinteria Rusty Blackbird reports

John Callender
 

Photos of the Rusty Blackbird are in my eBird list here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61205114

I'm not sure about the bird's sex, but would welcome input from people who are more familiar with the species.

The list also includes more photos of the continuing Laughing Gull that was on the beach with a large group of gulls a short distance west of Linden Avenue.

John Callender
Carpinteria

East Pinery Road Nov. 5

Florence Sanchez
 

After reading Dave Compton's report about some montane species he found in the area, I decided to hike East Pinery Road this morning.  I did not find Townsend's Solitaire, Pine Siskins, or Golden-crowned Kinglet this morning.  Red-breasted Nuthatches continue to be abundant, and Steller's Jays were especially visible and active this morning.  I had one Mountain Chickadee but no other montane species of note.  Otherwise, it was the usual chaparral and oak woodland birds, and unfortunately still lots of those pesky flies.  Last week's cold nights did not kill them off.

One bird of interest was a Western Meadowlark in the pine forest at the end of the"keyhole."  I have seen flocks of Meadowlarks from time to time in the meadows below, but do not recall having one in the forest before.  It looked most odd in the top of a pine tree.

Puzzling was the complete lack of Fox Sparrows at this location.  In years past, there have always been at least a few in the ceanothus thickets along the road.

Florence Sanchez

Carpinteria Rusty Blackbird reports

Dave Compton
 

A Rusty Blackbird is being reported in Carpinteria today. It was first included in an eBird checklist for the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Nature Park, but the notes say the bird was actually at Carpinteria State Beach at the end of Linden.


So someone needs an eBird lesson there.

John Callendar subsequently refound the bird at the same location, with Brewer's Blackbirds, and watched it fly each to toward Carpinteria Creek lagoon. Note that Brewer's Blackbirds often hang out in the campground in this area.

I have not seen photos of the bird, so don't know if it's supposed to be a male or female.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

Laughing Gull continues

Larry Ballard
 

It’s with a flock of 500+ gulls at the end of Elm

White-throated Sparrow - Buellton Feeders

Peter Schneekloth
 

My feeders have had a slow trickle of winter visitors including Red-breasted Nuthatch, Townsend's Warbler and American Goldfinch and this morning a White-throated Sparrow joined the flock.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/ 

Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

Birding SBFP

Betsy Mooney
 

Yesterday Lisa Nelms and I birded Santa Barbara Foothill Preserve in the late afternoon: https://ebird.org/checklist/S61193091

The immature White-tailed Kites are still showing some juvenile plumage. There is an adult present, but the young ones appear to be successfully hunting prey on their own. Two Northern Harriers are hunting in the same area with the kites. 

We also observed three beautiful and lively coyotes.

Betsy Mooney
Santa Barbara/Goleta

Re: Laughing Gull, Carpinteria

John Callender
 

The bird was still there as of 3:20 p.m., having moved a short distance west to near the south end of Holly Ave. From looking at references I think it is a fairly advanced first-year bird with a broad terminal tail band and a few brownish upperwing coverts. Photos are in the eBird list below:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61186807

John Callender
Carpinteria

Laughing Gull, Carpinteria

Larry Ballard
 

There's a Laughing Gull on the beach at the end of Elm St. (a block west of Linden) with California and Heermann's Gulls.
Larry Ballard
Carpinteria CA

Cruise ship pelagics well west of Point Arguello

Paul Lehman
 

Late on Sunday November 3rd a slug of birders aboard a southbound princess cruise ship entered Santa Barbara County waters over 90 km west of Point Arguello. We had only just over 30 minutes of light before sunset and during that time saw a Flesh footed shearwater and a Buller's shearwater and a South Polar skua and two black-footed albatrosses and 30 Pomarine Jeagers, 27 of which were in a single flock. Overall bird numbers were rather low. However. but then instead of hanging a left and going down the Santa Barbara Channel, as usual, to Los Angeles, the boat continued south over deep water all the way to the San Juan Seamount and then turned east past San Nicolas Is. But all of that was in the dark. Bummer!!!!!!!!

Paul Lehman

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com

Re: Laguna Blanca and Coal Oil Point Reserve

Nick Lethaby
 

My impression is the large shorebird roost is on/off here. I have seen this many times in the past but i don't believe it is an every night thing. There is a similar phenomenon at the mouth of the Santa Ynez River, with large shorebirds arriving very late at dusk.


On Sun, Nov 3, 2019 at 8:04 PM Mark Holmgren <maholmgren33@...> wrote:

At dusk at Devereux Slough I watched as battalions of brown waders poured in to the slough just north of the half bridge. Before dark and fog settled in, I was able to count 175 individuals.  I got an exact count of the Long-billed Curlews.  I then estimated the proportion remaining that were Whimbrels and Marbled Godwits.  A healthy bunch of Semipalmated Plovers also arrived late, but spread out along the channel further north.  

I seldom bird Devereux at this time of day.  Have others noticed this roost of waders here?  eBird checklist is here: 

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61165629

 

Elsewhere, the Dune Pond at Coal Oil Point Reserve provides excellent entertainment. Best light is in the morning. (Scope recommended)

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61162872

 

Duckage is getting quite good (13 species) at Laguna Blanca. There is a new attitude there that might be a bit more permissive to scopers on the south side (along Lago Drive) looking north.  La Cumbre Country Club locals have financed the water that is pumped into Laguna Blanca.  One objective is to make the place more bird friendly.  So some of the locals appreciate hearing about the birds we birders are seeing there.  Go easy there.  See https://ebird.org/checklist/S61151432

 

Mark Holmgren

Santa Barbara



--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200
Work: 805 562 5106

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Laguna Blanca and Coal Oil Point Reserve

Mark Holmgren
 

At dusk at Devereux Slough I watched as battalions of brown waders poured in to the slough just north of the half bridge. Before dark and fog settled in, I was able to count 175 individuals.  I got an exact count of the Long-billed Curlews.  I then estimated the proportion remaining that were Whimbrels and Marbled Godwits.  A healthy bunch of Semipalmated Plovers also arrived late, but spread out along the channel further north.  

I seldom bird Devereux at this time of day.  Have others noticed this roost of waders here?  eBird checklist is here: 

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61165629

 

Elsewhere, the Dune Pond at Coal Oil Point Reserve provides excellent entertainment. Best light is in the morning. (Scope recommended)

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61162872

 

Duckage is getting quite good (13 species) at Laguna Blanca. There is a new attitude there that might be a bit more permissive to scopers on the south side (along Lago Drive) looking north.  La Cumbre Country Club locals have financed the water that is pumped into Laguna Blanca.  One objective is to make the place more bird friendly.  So some of the locals appreciate hearing about the birds we birders are seeing there.  Go easy there.  See https://ebird.org/checklist/S61151432

 

Mark Holmgren

Santa Barbara

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron at Goleta Beach County Park

Ryan Seppala
 

This afternoon I found (or re-found) a young Yellow-crowned Night-Heron in the slough at Goleta Beach County Park. It was mixed in with a number of Black-crowned Night-Herons near the following coordinates: (34.417704, -119.830896). It can be viewed from the bridge that runs over the creek at the park entrance, but a better idea would be to walk over the bridge towards Sandspit Road and then take the bike path east for a short ways. The last time one was reported here was just over a month ago, so it's uncertain whether this bird is a new individual or the same as before.

Checklist with photos: https://ebird.org/checklist/S61160793

Ryan Seppala
UCSB

Re: Mysterious canary! NOT

Bradley Hacker
 

It was a community effort. Different people found the bird, photo'd it, and ID'd it. Happiness all around.

On 11/3/2019 14:22, Joan Lentz (cox.net address) wrote:
Hi All:
	Oooops.  Looks like I blew off a really interesting leucistic Common Yellowthroat.  To be perfectly honest, I never really saw this bird clearly, so didn’t put it on my list.
	However, Marilyn saw the bird quite well, & said it didn’t look like anything she’d every seen before.  Hmmmm...
	No wonder.
	In any case, I was, of course, just following in the footsteps of my friend Mark, whom I expect to know these kinds of things!
	Thanks to energetic Brad Hacker, & his fine photographic skills, we’ve solved this mystery.
	It’s a gorgeous bird, & if I’d spent some time on it, I would’ve been better off, rather than fretting about missing the Northern Waterthrush.
	Lesson learned.

	Joan Lentz
	Santa Barbara





________________________________________________________
Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630 
http://hacker.faculty.geol.ucsb.edu
LASS: http://www.petrochronology.com
EPMA, SEM & EBSD: http://sites.google.com/site/semgeolucsb

--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums