Date   
Santa Maria Valley

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

I followed mostly in Wes's footsteps today. The large BB Plover flock just west of Jack McConnell Park held 2 adult Pacific Goldens. I had about 8 Ferruginous Hawks on the area, virtually all ultra distant to the SW along with a Prairie Falcon. The Santa Maria River mouth had Common and Pacific Loons offshore and the expected gulls, ducks, and shorebirds on the lagoon. Best was a Greater Scaup. Mitchell Road had 30 trikes and single Prairie Falcon and Ferruginous Hawk. The field along Betteravia just held Smaller numbers of the species Wes reported.

Nick, Goleta

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Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mysterious canary! NOT

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
Oooops. Looks like I blew off a really interesting leucistic Common Yellowthroat. To be perfectly honest, I never really saw this bird clearly, so didn’t put it on my list.
However, Marilyn saw the bird quite well, & said it didn’t look like anything she’d every seen before. Hmmmm...
No wonder.
In any case, I was, of course, just following in the footsteps of my friend Mark, whom I expect to know these kinds of things!
Thanks to energetic Brad Hacker, & his fine photographic skills, we’ve solved this mystery.
It’s a gorgeous bird, & if I’d spent some time on it, I would’ve been better off, rather than fretting about missing the Northern Waterthrush.
Lesson learned.

Joan Lentz
Santa Barbara

Re: Bird Refuge puzzler is a leucistic CoYe

Bradley Hacker
 

Group consensus is that this is a leucistic Common Yellowthroat. This makes good sense to me, especially this pic, in which you can see the faint white "eyebrow". Thanks to all who responded. Sorry the bird isn't something more exotic.

On 11/3/2019 11:19, Bradley Hacker via Groups.Io wrote:
One of my camera bodies is misbehaving and I have been trying to diagnose the problem before sending it back to Canon, so today I went down to the SW corner of the AC Birdless Refuge to shoot the Canary reported by Mark H and others in recent days. No problem finding a pale yellow bird. But, the bird I found is not a canary, but a leucistic warbler, I think.
* Is it a leucistic warbler?
* Nashville??
* Is this the same bird as the Canary?
(warning: pictures are bad)

(This bird was originally mistakenly reported by me from an incorrect location; please disregard.)
--
 ________________________________________________________

Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630


--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

________________________________________________________
Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630 
http://hacker.faculty.geol.ucsb.edu
LASS: http://www.petrochronology.com
EPMA, SEM & EBSD: http://sites.google.com/site/semgeolucsb

--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

10 WTKs @ LLC

Steve Ferry
 

Today around 11 AM I saw 10 White-tailed Kites perched in snags south of the dam at Lake Los Carneros.

Steve Ferry
Goleta

Re: Bird Refuge puzzler

Mark Holmgren
 

Nice photos, Brad.  By graduated tail, face pattern, and bill shape this looks like a Common Yellowthroat that has lost its dark feather color expression. My fleeting glance of this bird on Friday led me to canary only because of this odd color. 

Mark Holmgren 
San Marcos Pass

On Sun, Nov 3, 2019 at 11:20 AM Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:
One of my camera bodies is misbehaving and I have been trying to diagnose the problem before sending it back to Canon, so today I went down to the SW corner of the AC Birdless Refuge to shoot the Canary reported by Mark H and others in recent days. No problem finding a pale yellow bird. But, the bird I found is not a canary, but a leucistic warbler, I think.
* Is it a leucistic warbler?
* Nashville??
* Is this the same bird as the Canary?
(warning: pictures are bad)

(This bird was originally mistakenly reported by me from an incorrect location; please disregard.)
--
 ________________________________________________________

Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630


--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

Re: Bird Refuge puzzler

Rebecca Coulter
 

It really says Common Yellowthroat to me, too, but what about that bright yellow tail? Could it be a hybrid, leucistic or not? And if so, of the wood warblers, couldn't only Yellow Warbler contribute the yellow tail? Fascinating. 

Rebecca Coulter
SB

On Nov 3, 2019, at 11:25 AM, Glenn Kincaid <glenn@...> wrote:

I agree leucistic warbler, possibly yellowthroat?

On Nov 3, 2019, at 12:20 PM, Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:


One of my camera bodies is misbehaving and I have been trying to diagnose the problem before sending it back to Canon, so today I went down to the SW corner of the AC Birdless Refuge to shoot the Canary reported by Mark H and others in recent days. No problem finding a pale yellow bird. But, the bird I found is not a canary, but a leucistic warbler, I think.
* Is it a leucistic warbler?
* Nashville??
* Is this the same bird as the Canary?
(warning: pictures are bad)

(This bird was originally mistakenly reported by me from an incorrect location; please disregard.)
-- 
 ________________________________________________________

Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630


-- 
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

-- 
Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara

Re: Bird Refuge puzzler

Glenn Kincaid
 

I agree leucistic warbler, possibly yellowthroat?

On Nov 3, 2019, at 12:20 PM, Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:


One of my camera bodies is misbehaving and I have been trying to diagnose the problem before sending it back to Canon, so today I went down to the SW corner of the AC Birdless Refuge to shoot the Canary reported by Mark H and others in recent days. No problem finding a pale yellow bird. But, the bird I found is not a canary, but a leucistic warbler, I think.
* Is it a leucistic warbler?
* Nashville??
* Is this the same bird as the Canary?
(warning: pictures are bad)

(This bird was originally mistakenly reported by me from an incorrect location; please disregard.)
--
 ________________________________________________________

Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630


--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

--
Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara

Bird Refuge puzzler

Bradley Hacker
 

One of my camera bodies is misbehaving and I have been trying to diagnose the problem before sending it back to Canon, so today I went down to the SW corner of the AC Birdless Refuge to shoot the Canary reported by Mark H and others in recent days. No problem finding a pale yellow bird. But, the bird I found is not a canary, but a leucistic warbler, I think.
* Is it a leucistic warbler?
* Nashville??
* Is this the same bird as the Canary?
(warning: pictures are bad)

(This bird was originally mistakenly reported by me from an incorrect location; please disregard.)
--
 ________________________________________________________

Bradley R. Hacker             Professor of Geology
Dept of Earth Science and Earth Research Institute
University of California, Santa Barbara CA 93106-9630


--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

White-throated Swifts

Steven Gaulin
 

Yesterday (11/2/19) I saw two flying over the high bridge on Foothill Road that crosses Steven's Park in the San Roque neighborhood of Santa Barbara. I suspect they nest under this bridge but was mildly surprised to see them there at this season. Perhaps just a coincidence.

Steven Gaulin
Santa Barbara

No waterthrush today at Bird Refuge

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi Birders:
Marilyn Harding & I walked from the parking lot at the Bird Refuge to the southwest corner to look for Mark Holmgren’s Northern Waterthrush seen yesterday. No luck today, but we did see the yellow “canary” he mentioned, an escaped bird, so we were in the right location. We were joined by Marge & Don Thornton also looking for the waterthrush.
Yesterday, before I realized how smoky the air had become, I stopped at the patch of pines on Ortega Ridge Rd, where I heard at least 3 Red-breasted Nuthatches. It’s interesting that they’re unaccompanied this year by other montane species such as chickadees or Pygmy Nuthatches, as Dave mentioned in his post about Figueroa Mtn.
Loureyro Rd where Romero Creek crosses is still good with running water & common birds bathing.
Lastly, in my garden where seed and water is very available, I had NO White-crowned Sparrows on a list I made this evening!

Good birding!
Joan Lentz

Figueroa Mtn and Ranger Peak

Dave Compton
 

I drove Figueroa Mtn Rd this morning and early afternoon, and I made a couple of extended stops, one along the road in the conifer forest at Ranger Peak and one along Catway Rd. The most notable birds were probably a single TOWNSEND'S SOLITAIRE at Ranger Peak, several Golden-crowned Kinglets at both places, and 2-3 flyover Pine Siskins at both stops. It will likely surprise no one that Red-breasted Nuthatches were abundant at both stops. Hard to know how many there were, but my eBird checklists included 18 at Ranger Peak and 10 at Catway Rd (all of the latter in a small area about a quarter mile from Figueroa Mtn Rd). 

Other than these species, there were almost no montane species anywhere. Not only were there no Pygmy Nuthatches, but there were no Mountain Chickadees to be found. Just two or three Steller's Jays at each of the two main stops and a couple of Hairy Woodpeckers at Catway Rd. 

It's pretty normal to have Townsend's Solitaire at Ranger Peak, and a few Pine Siskins in November is pretty normal, too. We've had one report of a Red Crossbill, but a check of eBird shows that the occurrences of that species in southern California this fall are not out of the ordinary. Seems like the big influx of Red-breasted Nutnatches isn't being paralleled in the occurrence of any other montane species.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara


Lompoc area

Nick Lethaby
 

I had a Prairie Falcon along Miguelito Canyon. No Varied Thrushes at the park. I walked the beach between between the river mouth and Wall Beach hoping for Mountain Plover, but no luck. Not much in the river mouth, about 6 Dunlin, 2 Avocet, and 14 LB Dowitchers.

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200
Work: 805 562 5106

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Pine Siskins moving in, 2019-11-02

Wim van Dam
 

As was to be expected given the abundant Red-breasted Nuthatches this Fall, PINE SISKINs are moving in as well. I had two of them at my Solvang feeder today. 

Wim

--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

Black-and-White Warbler

Hugh Ranson
 


This morning there was a Black-and-White Warbler at Bohnett Park which is on the westside of Santa Barbara. It was along the creek at the east (Anapamu St) end. Also there was a Red-breasted Nuthatch.

Hugh Ranson
Santa Barbara

SYV Osprey

Jerry Rounds
 

Late yesterday (11/1) afternoon an Osprey was on the telephone (actually cable TV) wires along Calzada, east of 154, eating a 10" fish. I don't know of any nearby water.
Jerry Rounds

East Beach this morning

Mark Holmgren
 

This morning starting at the SW corner of the Andree Clark Bird Refuge (closest to the beach volleyball courts), I walked all of East Beach hoping to see Dika’s Mountain Plover from two days ago.  I did not find it.  I was thinking that the recent cold weather might have pushed some gulls, loons, or ducks our way.  That did not seem to be happening.

 

But at this corner of the Bird Refuge was a Northern Waterthrush (photos attached). On East Beach I counted about 170 Black Skimmers, 33 Snowy Plovers (in one flock at 34.41351 -119.68422), 2 Royal Terns, and zero Mew Gulls.

 

 Monthly COPR Bird Survey with Jessica Nielsen. Our intent is to survey only the birds using the slough bottom. Other species were ignored. We scoped from the Venoco Road bridge, from the northern pullout along Slough Road, from the half bridge, and from the south end of the slough channel. The slough is 95% dry N of the half-bridge. Weather was sunny, clear, and mid-60sF.  Mission Creek outflow was not too birdy.

 

Mark Holmgren

SM Pass

Buffleheads

Steven Gaulin
 

More or less on schedule, there were two handsome males at Goleta Slough this afternoon

Steven Gaulin
Santa Barbara

Goleta Beach birds

Ron Hirst
 

Today a Peregrine often chased pigeons resident on the pier, an Osprey flew by, and a committee of Vultures eyed a dead seal.. The vultures are planning a wake. In the last couple weeks a Peregrine, tens of godwits, whimbrels, and 12 LB curlews. A Glaucous-winged Gull adult has been around for a week. Hundred+ Cowbirds. 10 or so BC Night Herons and possible juvenile YC Night Heron. Tens of Snowy Egrets, some GB Herons and Great Egrets. 14 Greater Yellowlegs and 46 BN Stilts were a high count. No ducks in channel yet. Ron Hirst, SB

LLC & Stow Grove

Florence Sanchez
 

I checked out these spots this morning.  It was a lovely day to bird and there was abundant bird activity throughout the Park at LLC, though I found nothing rare.  Habitat is excellent for wintering birds with lots of berries, olives, good lake level, and a couple of eucalyptus coming into bloom.   NOt much variety in ducks yet.

At Stow Grove, it was fairly quiet, but it was also almost 11 a.m. when I got there, so that was to be expected.  No sign of any Sapsuckers--just lots of Acorn Woodpeckers and a single Nuttall's.  The most interesting feature at this location is an oozing water pipe that was pulling in lots of birds.  Again, I didn't see anything unexpected, but the variety was nice and it would be a good venue for a "big sit."  Just bring a chair, sit and relax, and see what comes in during the morning. 

The pipe is at the west end of the redwood section, just before a big pile of wood chips.  IT is in an area surrounded by wood rail fence and has several dead young redwoods in the enclosre.  The pipe is tall and should have a rainbird head on it, but the head is missing and water is seeping down the length of the pipe.  Consequently, birds catch what drinks they can from top to bottom, wherever they can get a good perch.  Species I saw visit the pipe over a brief time were Acorn Woodpecker, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Dark-eyed Junco, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, House Finch, and Lesser Goldfinch.

Florence Sanchez

Plumbeous Vireo at Ellwood Mesa Open Space

Ryan Seppala
 

Just had a Plumbeous Vireo at the Ellwood Mesa Open Space in Goleta, in the ravine past the beach access sign. It was only a short ways down, in the first small pine on the right side of the trail as well as some nearby shrubs. 


Approx coordinates: 34.4205, -119.8935

Ryan Seppala
UCSB