Date   

Re: UCSB OVerlook

Patrick McNulty <mcnulty-p@...>
 

Just to fill in a some of few Sunday hours still unaccounted for at The UCSB Overlook of Goleta Slough (often referred to as Area K), I was out there about 9-10:15 am but could find no Stilt Sandpiper, and then Dave Compton and I were both out there about 3-4 pm and saw 4 Long-billed Curlews and at least one Pectoral Sandpiper, but no Stilt.

(Dave, the Pectoral came out and gave much better looks right after you left.)

Patrick
Patrick McNulty Phone: (805) 967-9900
Santa Barbara, CA E-Mail: mcnulty@...


Reddish Egret photos available

Jamie M. Chavez <jc.wings@...>
 

All,

Morgan Ball took some stunning photos of the Goleta Reddish Egret recently and thanks to Mark Holmgren for sending them to me, we now have nine available for viewing at the group home page (link at the bottom of this message). Click on the Files link at the left side of the page. No need to sign in- the Files link is open to the public.

good birdin',

Jamie Chavez
sbcobirding list Meister


Lesser Nighthawk at Area K, 13 Aug

Mark Holmgren <maholmgren@...>
 

Lots of Wilson's Phalarope, several Lesser Yellowlegs, but we failed to see any Pectoral or Stilt Sandpipers. However, Dave Hubbard and I watched more than 1000 crows gather along the N side of the E-W runway, then go to roost in what remains of the Los Carneros Wetland just N of Hollister and just E of Los Carneros. We followed a White-tailed Kite to its roost in the mountains or upper foothills of Carneros Creek. (Does anyone know any other roosting localities of kites this post-breeding season?) And, we followed a male and female or juvenile Lesser Nighthawk flying back and forth over Area K from about 7:38 to 8:00 pm. A great place to end the day!
Mark


Mark Holmgren, Vice President
San Marcos Foothills Coalition
http://sanmarcosfoothills.org/


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Reddish Egret at Devereux

Karen Bridgers
 

Marilyn Harding reports that the Reddish Egret was at Devereux Slough (just
out from the first turn-out) this morning (Tues).

Karen Bridgers
kbridgers@...


Where is Area K on Goleta Slough?

Mark Holmgren <holmgren@...>
 

Hi folks,
The UCSB Overlook of Goleta Slough is often referred to as Area K and
sometimes as the hardpan mudflats. The term Area K comes from a Santa
Barbara Municipal Airport consultant’s document that assigned a letter to
each of the somewhat isolated basins within the estuary so that they could
be mapped, identified, and discussed. Area K is viewed from Mesa Road on
the UCSB campus. Mesa Road is accessible either by driving along the north
edge of campus from the hwy 217 entrance (the East entrance) or from Los
Carneros Road to the west.
To view birds, stand on the UCSB bluff top just south of Goleta Slough. The
bluff top is across the street from UCSB’s Environmental Health and Safety
Building. See the map at the web site below (find the words ‘Mesa Road’).
The trick is the parking problem. Fortunately, the best viewing times
during the week are also the best times to find parking spots: before 8am
and after 5pm. On weekends parking is legal anytime in the right place.
The right place is Lot 14 just next to the Environmental Health and Safety
Building. Good luck with the Nighthawks.
Want to know why we have Area K, how it was formed?
Mark


http://www.park.ucsb.edu/ucsbmap.html


UCSB overlooks

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

All:

I checked the UCSB overlook at lunch for about 45 minutes. There were
several other birders present. There are now a lot more peeps around, both
Least and Westerns. Also there were 2 Semi-palmated Plovers and I finally
caught up with the 2 adult Pectoral Sandpipers by looking through the fence
at the sewage/water facility at the west end. Another birder had a juv
Baird's there but I couldn't refind it. It's easy for birds to hide in the
salicornia there.

Nick Lethaby
DSP/BIOS Product Manager
Texas Instruments
(805) 562 5106
nlethaby@...


slow messages

Karen Bridgers
 

Hi all

I posted a message to sbcobirding fairly early this morning, and it has not
appeared in my Inbox yet (it's 4:30-ish now), but it did appear on the
sbcobirding web page quite a bit earlier. This is not the first time this
has happened, and it happens not just to me.

May I suggest that in order to keep up on the current bird sightings, you
check the group home page periodically. (I know there's a message from Nick
Lethaby sitting there, too.) The address is at the bottom of all sbcobirding
messages, or it's at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding, in case you don't have any
messages to refer to.

I have begun to make checking this page a habit, as I find that sbcobirding
messages are often delayed by hours (or even days).

Karen Bridgers


Re: slow messages

Jamie M. Chavez <jc.wings@...>
 

Group,

I am curious to know who else might be experiencing the slow message
problem. Either with delivery or not seeing your message being posted on the
group home page. Please reply to me off list. Here is some info from Yahoo
Groups:

How long does it take for messages to get delivered to the group?
In general, messages are delivered almost immediately.
Occasionally there are delays of a few minutes or hours due to
high-volume traffic or scheduled system downtime.


Jamie Chavez
sbcobirding-owner@...


Nighthawk again at Area K

Mark Holmgren <holmgren@...>
 

The female or juv Lesser nighthawk was again at the Campus overlook to Area
K this evening from about 7:45 to shortly after 8pm. A Blue Grosbeak was
calling from somewhere below the bluff. A slightly different array of birds
this evening -- more peeps, dowitchers, godwits, and teal.
Mark


Sharp-shinned Hawk

Paul Keller <wrentit@...>
 

Late this morning a Sharp-shinned Hawk flew over the Isla Vista vernal pool
area towards the Isla Vista School. It soared in circles as sharpies often
do. Oddly, it also hovered kestral-like over the field before flying off.
It was small, probably a male. I believe it was a juvenal as I saw brown
but no reddish tones. -- Paul K.


Re: Nojoqui Monday

Jim Greaves <greaves@...>
 

Sorry about 2 day delay. Nojoqui park area did NOT have any purple martins on Monday (13 August), and no swallows of any kind (about noon). Few "summer visitor" birds noted, and likely all that were there are of the "permanent" resident type, such as Oregon juncos, etc. Good time to start looking for "other" juncos.


Re: Where is Area K on Goleta Slough?

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

More on parking at UCSB: the right place to park is not on the grass at the
overlook. Campus parking regulations require that one must park within marked
stalls at all times of day. If you park on the grass or even at roadside, you
will get an expensive ticket. I warned a couple of birders about this
yesterday.

I think the EHS lot Mark is referring to is Lot 17, not 14. As he said, after 5
and on weekends, it's unrestricted and the best place to park. If you come
during fee parking hours (6:30-5, Monday through Friday), you must purchase a
permit. Lot 17 does not allow visitors' permits, so the next closest lots that
do are Lot 31 (Facilities Management) and Lot 32 (behind the Police station).
Enjoy Area K while it lasts--the shorebirding is tops right now.

Florence Sanchez


Mark Holmgren wrote:

Hi folks,
The UCSB Overlook of Goleta Slough is often referred to as Area K and
sometimes as the hardpan mudflats. The term Area K comes from a Santa
Barbara Municipal Airport consultant�s document that assigned a letter to
each of the somewhat isolated basins within the estuary so that they could
be mapped, identified, and discussed. Area K is viewed from Mesa Road on
the UCSB campus. Mesa Road is accessible either by driving along the north
edge of campus from the hwy 217 entrance (the East entrance) or from Los
Carneros Road to the west.
To view birds, stand on the UCSB bluff top just south of Goleta Slough. The
bluff top is across the street from UCSB�s Environmental Health and Safety
Building. See the map at the web site below (find the words �Mesa Road�).
The trick is the parking problem. Fortunately, the best viewing times
during the week are also the best times to find parking spots: before 8am
and after 5pm. On weekends parking is legal anytime in the right place.
The right place is Lot 14 just next to the Environmental Health and Safety
Building. Good luck with the Nighthawks.
Want to know why we have Area K, how it was formed?
Mark

http://www.park.ucsb.edu/ucsbmap.html



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UCSB overlook

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

All:

At lunch I caught up with the Juv Baird's and also found a Solitary
Sandpiper. Numbers of other shorebirds, especially Wilson's Phalaropes seem
to be down a bit.


Nick Lethaby
DSP/BIOS Product Manager
Texas Instruments
(805) 562 5106
nlethaby@...


Area K

Teresa <overland@...>
 

At 8:34 PM -0700 8/14/01, Mark Holmgren wrote:
Want to know why we have Area K, how it was formed?
> Mark

So, Mark -- Are you going to tell us? ;-)


Area K

Guy Tingos <GTingos@...>
 

The following were seen from the Area K overlook at UCSB yesterday
afternoon and evening:

2 Pectoral Sandpipers
1 Baird's Sandpiper
2-3 Lesser Nighthawks
2 Coyotes
a family of Raccoons with 5 or6 puppy-sized babies
lots of dowitchers (both), yellowlegs (both), and other shorebirds

Guy


UCSB Overlook at noon

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

Today at noon, there was still a nice assortment of shorebirds present,
though the total numbers are down. There are definitely fewer egrets
present than in the last two weeks, but still good numbers of Stilts,
both species of Yellowlegs, and lots of small shorebirds, including
Kildeer, Semipalmated Plovers, Least Sandpipers, and Western
Sandpipers. Of note today was one Long-billed Curlew, 1 juvenile
Baird's Sandpiper, and one adult Pectoral Sandpiper. Four Dowitchers
were present, at least one of them a juvenile Short-billed. Nick was
still trying to locate a Solitary Sandpiper when I had to leave--hope he
was successful.

Florence Sanchez


juv. Least Bittern

Joan E. Lentz <jelentz@...>
 

Hi! This morning in a quick tour around Stow House & Lake Los Carneros, I
had lots of western migrant warblers (Yellow, Wilson's mostly, a
Black-throated Gray), and several Western Tanagers in the lerped eucs. by
the parking lot. On the south side of the footbridge at the lake, a young
Least Bittern was hiding in the reeds. It was calling a lot "yak-yak-yak"
& I had good views.
Great-tailed Grackles w/ young were at the southeast end, but did not
notice any Ross's Geese around.
Good birding, Joan


Goose napping?

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

I noticed the absence of the Ross's Geese a couple of months or more ago,
along with it seems the other big white geese there. Has anyone seen the big
white geese there at all. I was thinking that someone (maybe the council)
removed these (they're pretty obnoxious) and took the wild Ross's Goose too.

-----Original Message-----
From: Joan E. Lentz [mailto:jelentz@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2001 4:24 PM
To: SB Co Bird
Subject: [sbcobirding] juv. Least Bittern


Hi! This morning in a quick tour around Stow House & Lake Los Carneros, I
had lots of western migrant warblers (Yellow, Wilson's mostly, a
Black-throated Gray), and several Western Tanagers in the lerped eucs. by
the parking lot. On the south side of the footbridge at the lake, a young
Least Bittern was hiding in the reeds. It was calling a lot "yak-yak-yak"
& I had good views.
Great-tailed Grackles w/ young were at the southeast end, but did
not
notice any Ross's Geese around.
Good birding, Joan

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Re: juv. Least Bittern

Cyril Sch?nb?chler <troglodyte@...>
 

On the south side of the footbridge at the lake, a young
Least Bittern was hiding in the reeds. It was calling a lot "yak-yak-yak"
& I had good views.
Hi all,

did somebody knows if they bred there this year ?
Joan, do you know if he was able to fly, or if he still had some juv. feathers on his head ? ?
I guess it would be a great record if they actually bred.

happy birding

Cyril


Dark-rumped Petrel

David Vander Pluym
 

Sorry about this third post but I have no idea why the text of the message
isn't being forwarded so here it is (I hope) cut and pasted out of the
e-mail. Once again here is the message that Ryan Shaw asked me to post


David, could you possibly forward this to CALBIRD, Thanks!
Ryan

Greetings everyone, sorry for the delay in details, but after the research
cruise, I did some birding in Arizona and Mexico and just now got back to a
computer.  Here is my write-up on the DR Petrel.


DARK-RUMPED PETREL
Pterodroma phaeopygia

Observer:  Ryan T. Shaw
Location:  Approximately 100 miles west of Point Conception, Santa Barbara
County, California.
34.195 Latitude  122.687 Longitude
Time and Duration:  13:02PST.  on July 25, 2001;  45 second duration.
Weather:  Completely overcast, viewing conditions were great as visibility
was about 10 kilometers.
Wind:  5 knots, from the north
Swell:  2-4 feet.
Optics:  Bausch and Lomb Elite 8x42 binoculars.

While on transect with a heading of 01 degrees, I was seeing very few birds.
A Black-footed Albatross here, some Leach's Storm-Petrels there, but for the
most part, it was a slow day.  Then my eyes perked up when I saw a
pterodroma flying from the north closing in on the bow of the 160 foot
research vessel, New Horizon.  I thought to myself, "Great, my ABA Area
Cook's Petrel"  ( I had seen 2 Cook's Petrels on some previous transects,
but in Mexican and International waters).  Then the size of the bird hit me.
This was not a Cook's Petrel, it was quite a bit larger than the Cook's I
had seen earlier in the week.  I would say almost twice the size.  The bird
was flying with languid arcs, and it was about 30 meters off the bow when it
displayed its ventral side.  Nearly all white underwings and belly with
black on the primary tips and trailing edge.  A black "wrist patch" at the
carpal joint was noted, and it extended to the primary coverts one way, and
a lateral dark line extended into the secondary coverts the other way.  The
bird then banked again, showing me its dorsal surface.  My response to
seeing this was "Holy ****, Dark-rumped Petrel!"  The wings, mantle, rump,
and tail were solid black-brown, as was the head from just abouve the eye,
down the side of the neck giving the bird a partial colar.  I could detect
no contrast at all from the upperparts, besides the contrast of the dark
upperparts and the gleaming white forehead.  The bird's size was comparable
to that of a Sooty Shearwater, though more elegant and graceful looking.
Slim and trim and very long winged.  The bird arced a few more times as it
continued on its course southward.

I do have previous experience with this species, though only on one other
occasion.  Off Kauai, Hawaii on April 1, 2001.  But this sighting I have to
say, was much better, closer, and way more satisfying as it left no doubt in
my mind of possible confusion with other Pterodromas.

Elimination of similar species was easy, as Juan Fernandez Petrel would be
the only one in this region that could possibly be confused with Dark-rump
(and boy did I ever hope to see a JF Petrel on this trip, but luck only goes
so far).  JF Petrel can be eliminated by my bird having solid dark
upperparts, where Juan has a more contrastin and paler dorsal surface, paler
rump, and some individuals have white necks. Also the white forehead is more
extensive in DR Petrel than JF.  As is the partial dark colar.

Sources used was Harrison's SEABIRDS,
Notes written after the sighting while on research station.

Ryan T. Shaw
4670 Barrington Lane SE
Lacey, Washington 98503
rtshaw80@...



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