Date   

La Purisima Mission

Corrine Ardoin <see.run2@...>
 

A few of us birded and butterflied the La Purisima mission, walking up to
the water pond/cistern or whatever that is. It was wonderfully warm without
blasting wind and dreary fog for a change, so the walk was very enjoyable,
seeing baby birds out stumbling about the limbs following one another
closely. Even heard young crows, which is not a pretty sound. Not much out
of the ordinary, Pacific-slope Flycatchers, Lawrence's Goldfinch,
woodpeckers, and such, but I can tell you we saw lots of butterflies:
Variable Checkerspot, Lorquin's Admiral, Satyr Comma, Umber Skipper, Tailed
Copper, Funereal Duskywing, and Swallowtails.

It was gorgeous!

Corrine Ardoin
Santa Maria


Nests

Dick Cofiell <foxtrot.14@...>
 

Hi All,
I was camping at Rancho Oso this past week and in the hitch on my fifth wheel trailer was a House Finch nest. They build it in two days. We got there late one evening and stayed two days. The next morning while breaking down to come home I watched the finches come in and go out of the hitch. It was complete. I knew they built them fast, but didn't realize it was that fast. Dick Cofiell


website

JHcynwren@...
 

I have updated the website and the total species seen in the county in 2002
stands at 302.

Joan Hardie


Black & White Warbler

Bruce & Cher Hollingworth <hollingw@...>
 

With an hour to kill, we birded Miguelito Park this morning. At the "restroom end" of the park, foraging in an oak by the creek, was a male Black-and-White Warbler.

We had walked to that particular oak, because a Dusky Flycatcher was singing and calling there. There were lots of Warbling and Hutton's Vireos, Purple Finches and Lawrence's Goldfinches. We found nests of Bewick's Wren and Violet-green Swallows. We heard Band-tailed Pigeons, but didn't look for them.

Cher


Deep sea trip

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

I haven't seen a posting from Mitch, so thought I would give a brief
trip report on the deep sea trip on the Condor Express on May 25.
Though the weather was overcast and cool, the sea was calm and
visibility was excellent--great condidtions for birding! Unfortunately,
some of the hope-for species didn't know that and failed to make an
appearance. No Petrels, no Laysan Albatross, no Horned Puffin. We did
see four species of storm-petrel, with Leach's being particularly
abundant (we had both the dark-rumped and white-rumped forms), Sooty and
Pink-footed Shearwaters, Black-footed Albatross, South Polar Skua,
Sabine's Gulls, and four species of alcid: Common Murre, Rhinocerous
Auklet, Cassin's Auklet, and Xantus's Murrelet (both forms). There were
several flocks of Red Phalaropes present in high breeding plummage, plus
one group of Red-necked Phalaropes.

But what we lacked in seabirds, we made up for in marine mammals. We
had the best sightings I've ever experienced of Fin Whales, who are fast
enough to outrun most boats, but not the Condor Express. In addition,
we had great views of Humpbacked Whales (tail-lobbing!), Blue Whales,
Cuvier's Beaked Whales (some discussion about this species, but that was
the consensus), and also saw Sperm Whales at a distance before they
sounded. We had four species of dolphin as well: Dahl's Porpise,
Pacific White-sided Dolphin, Northern Right Whale Dolphin, and Rizzo's
Porpise. Many of the dolphins came along for a bow wave ride, which is
always fun to watch.

The speed of the boat is such that we could spend almost the whole day
birding Arguello Canyon, rather than travelling to get there, and the
quality of the leadership was excellent. Even in the doldrums, someone
was up there in the wheelhouse watching all the time and as a result, we
got on birds or mammals right away. I would urge other Santa Barbara
birders to take advantage of these deep water trips. Pelagic birding is
always iffy--sometimes the birds are where you are looking and sometimes
they're not-- but Arguello Canyon is definitely a place worth revisiting
and the Condor provides the means to chase down anything you find.

Florence Sanchez


Re: Deep sea trip

Lethaby, Nick <nlethaby@...>
 

What were the four species of storm-petrel - Leach's, Black, Ashy, and ....
must have been something semi good (Fork-tailed, Least, or Wilson's, etc).

-----Original Message-----
From: Florence Sanchez [mailto:sanchez@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2002 4:24 PM
To: sbcobirding@...
Subject: [sbcobirding] Deep sea trip


I haven't seen a posting from Mitch, so thought I would give a brief
trip report on the deep sea trip on the Condor Express on May 25.
Though the weather was overcast and cool, the sea was calm and
visibility was excellent--great condidtions for birding! Unfortunately,
some of the hope-for species didn't know that and failed to make an
appearance. No Petrels, no Laysan Albatross, no Horned Puffin. We did
see four species of storm-petrel, with Leach's being particularly
abundant (we had both the dark-rumped and white-rumped forms), Sooty and
Pink-footed Shearwaters, Black-footed Albatross, South Polar Skua,
Sabine's Gulls, and four species of alcid: Common Murre, Rhinocerous
Auklet, Cassin's Auklet, and Xantus's Murrelet (both forms). There were
several flocks of Red Phalaropes present in high breeding plummage, plus
one group of Red-necked Phalaropes.

But what we lacked in seabirds, we made up for in marine mammals. We
had the best sightings I've ever experienced of Fin Whales, who are fast
enough to outrun most boats, but not the Condor Express. In addition,
we had great views of Humpbacked Whales (tail-lobbing!), Blue Whales,
Cuvier's Beaked Whales (some discussion about this species, but that was
the consensus), and also saw Sperm Whales at a distance before they
sounded. We had four species of dolphin as well: Dahl's Porpise,
Pacific White-sided Dolphin, Northern Right Whale Dolphin, and Rizzo's
Porpise. Many of the dolphins came along for a bow wave ride, which is
always fun to watch.

The speed of the boat is such that we could spend almost the whole day
birding Arguello Canyon, rather than travelling to get there, and the
quality of the leadership was excellent. Even in the doldrums, someone
was up there in the wheelhouse watching all the time and as a result, we
got on birds or mammals right away. I would urge other Santa Barbara
birders to take advantage of these deep water trips. Pelagic birding is
always iffy--sometimes the birds are where you are looking and sometimes
they're not-- but Arguello Canyon is definitely a place worth revisiting
and the Condor provides the means to chase down anything you find.

Florence Sanchez




~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ ~
Visit the group home page at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding

Post new messages to: sbcobirding@...
To unsubscribe: sbcobirding-unsubscribe@...
List owner contact: sbcobirding-owner@...
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ ~

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


BIRDWEST; Santa Barbara, CA; 5/31/02

Guy Tingos <guy.tingos@...>
 

- RBA
* California
* Santa Barbara
* May 31, 2002
* CASB0205.31
- Birds mentioned

Purple Martin
Black-and-white Warbler
Blue Grosbeak
Grasshopper Sparrow
- Transcript

This is the Santa Barbara Audubon Society's rare bird report being recorded on
Friday, May 31st at 3:30 p.m. If you have a rare bird sighting to report, call Karen
Bridgers at 964-1316. For those of you who are getting the transcript on the
Internet, the rare bird alert number for Santa Barbara is (805) 964-8240.

Kinevan Road, off West Camino Cielo at the top of Highway 154, had a few singing
Cassin's Vireos on Tuesday. Also here were a Stellar's Jay and a pair of Common
Ravens.

Farren Road, in west Goleta, which is always good in spring, still had two singing
GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS on May 19th. A pair of BLUE GROSBEAKS are also frequenting the
area. Farren Road is very narrow, so drive carefully, pulling off the road to park.
Watch out for rattlesnakes.

PURPLE MARTINS have returned to Nojoqui Falls Park, where they usually nest. Look
here, or along Alisal Road near the golf course for martins through the summer.

In Miguelito Park in Lompoc, a male BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER was seen yesterday, at
the "restroom end" of the park, in an oak near the creek.

That is all the bird news for now, but, again, if you have a rare sighting to report,
call Karen Bridgers at 964-1316. Good birding in Santa Barbara County.

- End transcript


Arroyo Hondo

Guy Tingos <guy.tingos@...>
 

A walk of the trials in Arroyo Hondo Canyon turned up lots of breeding Yellow
Warblers, some with young already. The only birds of note were a Blue Grosbeak and
several Ravens. This is a beautiful canyon; I recommend that everyone take
advantage of the restricted public access. Guy


Arroyo Hondo location and contact information

Guy Tingos <guy.tingos@...>
 

I've received several queries about Arroyo Hondo, so I thought I'd post the contact
information.

Arroyo Hondo is one of the latest acqusitions of the Land Trust for Santa Barbara
County. It is off of Highway 101 between Refugio and Gaviota State Beaches;the
entrance to the preserve is just west of the Tajiguas Landfill. Docent-led hikes are
offered the 3rd Sunday of every month for a fee, and the preserve is open to the
public without charge by reservation only on the 1st and 3rd Saturday and Sunday of
each month. The reservation number is (805) 567-1115. Guy


Cedar Waxwings in June

Paul G. Rosso <prrosso@...>
 

Had approximately 20 Cedar Waxwings on S. E Street/University Drive to
the hills in southern Lompoc on June 1st. A late observation.

Paul Rosso

________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.


North Americans Birds quarter

Dave Compton <davcompton@...>
 

Hi everyone,

The spring quarter for North American Birds is now over. I hope anyone who
has information on unusual sightings in Santa Barbara County and hasn't
posted it to this list or otherwise sent it to me will forward it along via
e-mail or snail mail. This includes any unusual breeding records and
documentation of any sightings of birds that are generally rare,
out-of-season, or away from their usual locations. Photos, drawings, and
descriptions of particularly rare birds are much appreciated.

Dave Compton
davcompton@...
P.O. Box 24152
Santa Barbara, CA 93101
(805) 965-3153


Re: Cedar Waxwings in June

Luke Cole <luke@...>
 

Paul et al.

I had about 30 Cedar Waxwings in the foothills above Santa Barbara this
morning (off Coyote Rd), as well. Wonder why they are staying around?

Luke Cole
San Francisco

----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul G. Rosso" <prrosso@...>
To: <sbcobirding@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 02, 2002 7:57 AM
Subject: [sbcobirding] Cedar Waxwings in June


Had approximately 20 Cedar Waxwings on S. E Street/University Drive to
the hills in southern Lompoc on June 1st. A late observation.

Paul Rosso

________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today! For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.


~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ ~ ~
Visit the group home page at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding

Post new messages to: sbcobirding@...
To unsubscribe: sbcobirding-unsubscribe@...
List owner contact: sbcobirding-owner@...
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
~ ~ ~ ~

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: Cedar Waxwings in June

David Vander Pluym
 

Though I have only lived at my current house (in the hills of Ventura) for a
couple years I have noticed that Cedar Waxwings are most common in my
neighborhood from mid may through early June. During the winter I will only
see a flock a couple of times flying over head however in May a flock of
about 30 birds will hang around feeding on berries with Phainopeplas. Also
over Memorial Day weekend I had a couple of Cedar Waxwings in the eastern
Kern County migrants spots. I believe that a portion of their population in
southern California sticks around later then most migrants perhaps to feed on
some berry late in the season? The ones in my neighborhood are feeding on
introduced berry plants though. In any chase it appears to me that Cedar
Waxwings regularly stay in southern California into at least the beginning of
June.

David Vander Pluym
UCSC


Scott's Oriole, Goleta?

hungry_valley <hungry_valley@...>
 

Yesterday, Sunday, driving south on Avenida Pequena;off Cathedral
Oaks, near Patterson Ave.. Bird was flying fast east to west and
appeared to be either in company or chasing (more likely) another non-
descript bird. I had a very good look and keyed it out against other
possibles and checked _The Birds of Santa Barbara_ and the SB count
lists. I'm going up later after I complete some chores. Would love
confirmation.


Cedar Waxwings

Corrine Ardoin <see.run2@...>
 

I was also noticing that the Cedar Waxwings in my neighborhood here in Santa
Maria have been sticking around later than in previous years. I notice it
around town, very active and rather large flocks still. In one area in
south Santa Maria, there is a flock of a couple hundred or more that
regularly perch on the utility wires, all in a line taking up two sections
between poles. Last year, however, there was a small flock at Waller Park
that was there all summer, while I did not see any elsewhere during that
time. I noticed with other species, their staying later than usual. The
White-crowned Sparrows winter in our area and they left a month later than
usual and had arrived last fall a month earlier. Must be the grub, er,
grubs?

Corrine Ardoin
Santa Maria


Walk out Phelps ditch

Joan E. Lentz <jelentz@...>
 

Hi all! In a walk this a.m. beginning at Phelps Ditch, crossing Ocean
Meadows Golf Course, going around the west edge of Devereux Slough, passing
the Dune Pond, & out to the Snowy Plover nesting area at the mouth of
Devereux, Joan Hardie & I had the following birds of interest:
Say's Phoebe: an adult feeding a juvenile on the golf course; another
phoebe was elsewhere on the course. This means they probably bred in the
vicinity, which is unusual this close to the coast in S.B. co. (however see
Nick Lethaby's post awhile ago).
Red-br. Nuthatch: one in the pines on the golf course
Snowy Plover nesting colony: I have to tell you how impressive it is to
see the way the C.O.P.R. folks have set up the fences around the Snowies,
and yet not impinging on the beach use all that much. There's a monitor
there, who was great; said most people were cooperative in not walking
through the fenced off areas. BUT the great thing is 5 fledged chicks this
year so far, &, as I understand it, 4 active nests in progress. Crows are
the biggest problem.
It is extremely exciting to me to learn that USFWS says this is the first
time a nesting Snowy area has been RECOVERED! A huge thanks to Christina
Sandoval & all her crew... I think the effort is paying off.
Joan Lentz
(PS The Dune Pond is drying up & may soon be shorebird habitat!)
(PPS Watch out for ticks!)


mountain report

JHcynwren@...
 

There were up to 5 vocalizing BLACK-CHINNED SPARROWS on the Fremont Trail
off E. Camino Cielo this morning. The OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER continues to
sing from Kinevan all day.
It has been very cold in the mountains this spring with strong north winds
through the passes most nights. There have been no insects. My observations
indicate that it has been difficult for the montane birds to reach their
breeding grounds and that late migrants are still passing through. The
weather has changed in the last 2 days with calm nights and hot and buggy
days. I suspect there may be some frantic breeding up here during the next
couple of weeks.
The Fremont Trail is on the left as you are driving east on E. Camino
Cielo. It is 1.5 miles from Hwy 154 and is behind an iron Forest Service
gate near a large group of pine trees. The Wooly-blue Curls on this
road/trail are quite lovely right now.

Joan Hardie


Redbreasted Nuthatch

Daryl Rutherford <rooster@...>
 

Attn: Dave Compton,Joan Lentz

There is 1 redbreasted nuthatch in the little Cambridge Park. Looking at
the county records indicates this is rather late for that bird to be hanging
around in District C. Just thought you might be interested

Carolyn Rutherford


Re: Redbreasted Nuthatch

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

The UCSB campus Red-breasted Nuthatches are still around, though the last time I
heard them was over a week ago in the pines near North Hall. About two weeks prior
to that, they were in the bushes around the running track. There do seem to be two
of them.

Florence

Daryl Rutherford wrote:

Attn: Dave Compton,Joan Lentz

There is 1 redbreasted nuthatch in the little Cambridge Park. Looking at
the county records indicates this is rather late for that bird to be hanging
around in District C. Just thought you might be interested

Carolyn Rutherford

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Visit the group home page at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sbcobirding

Post new messages to: sbcobirding@...
To unsubscribe: sbcobirding-unsubscribe@...
List owner contact: sbcobirding-owner@...
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Atascadero Creek update

kwhit@...
 

Good morning fellow birders!

I have been a big slacker about reporting banding results from the Atascadero
Creek MAPS site this year. Fortunately, Dave Compton has often been on site to
pass on info about the rareties that we caught or detected during banding
sessions. Overall, the most interesting factor this year has been the
protracted migration of Neotropical migrants including Yellow Warbler, Wilson's
Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Buntings etc. Until yesterday, we have been capturing
well over 100 of these per session. So far, our banding totals far exceed the
year totals for any other year we have banded at this site (and we still have 6
sessions left...). Fortunately for us, this seems to be the end of it (we were
just frantic out there trying to stay on top of things). However, we did catch
a YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT yesterday (a beautiful male) on the E-side of the site
for those who are interested. we also have a pair of SWAINSON"S THRUSHES in
breeding condition of the W-end, the male is a recap from last year who I
suspectd (but never got good evidence) of breeding there. There is also a
banded Warbling Vireo lurking about in the same area (I have high hopes). I
was not able to detect any WILSONs WARBLERS yesterday though. If anyone does,
could you please let me know?? I am trying to keep good records on birds that
breed on the site and not all of them find their way into the nets.

Here is a list of "unusual" birds (uncommon on the site) that we have banded or
detected so far:
(indicates captured/banded birds)

Common Nighthawk
Merlin
Calliope Hummingbird (2 males)
Cedar Waxwing (first one captured on site)
Dusky Flycatcher (2)
Willow Flycatcher (2 - one possible extimus)
California Thrasher (first one banded and territorial within site boundaries)
White-throated Swift
Hooded Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat (1)
Blue Grosbeak (2)
Indigo Bunting (1)

Nashville Warbler (2)
Townsend's Warbler (2 - first ones captured on site)


Also, we have had Unusually high numbers of:
Rufus Hummingbirds (males only counted to sp)
Allen's Hummingbirds (as above)
Black-chinned Hummingbirds (as above)
Yellow Warblers
Wilsons Warblers
Warbling Vireos
Lazuli Buntings
Western Tanagers

In short, it has been an interesting year so far! I will try to keep you
posted on a pre/session basis now that school is winding down.

Good birding! Kathleen