Date   

2 peregrines at SMRE Sunday

sbtech@...
 

Hello All,
On Sunday there was an adult and juvenile Peregrine at the SMRE. The juvenile sat on a stick near the mouth and the adult dove and harassed it so it flew away. The adult followed the juvenile north up the coast and returned to perch on the stick soon after. The adult liked to waddle in the open in the 1 inch sheen of water covering the rivermouth. It stood or waddled around for 30 minutes in a few locations while I watched from 50 - 100 yards. It was amusing to watch but didn't seem to be hunting things in the water. It perched on sticks a couple times. There were hundreds of Western Sandpipers and a few Least's and a Lesser Yellowlegs, ...
Regards, Ron


[Fwd: semi-palmated]

John Ayres <jayres37@...>
 

I only posted my sighting among the listers as Semi-palmated Sandpipers
had been posted by others in the last couple of days. Someone among
listers thought I should post to county, consequently...
John Ayres


Where to go?

James Eaton <J.A.Eaton@...>
 

Thanks for the response,
My plan is to:
arrive 26th august at San Fransisco then to Lee Vinning spend 3 days
at Yosemite/Mono lake area, then to Kern, Galileo, San Bernadino,
each for 1 day, Salton Sea - 2 days, orange and venture, 1 day each,
then slowly up to monterey then 1 day at monterey, then the 2
pelagics, and a final day (11 sep)around Pt reyes/bodega Bay

The birds that I have heard that could be hard to find/ or not many
reliable sites for are :
Owls(ie Great grey,Spotted,Pygmy,burrowing)
Sage Grouse
Inca Dove
Black Swifts
Costas Hummer
Lewis's/Gila/W-h Woodpeckers
Vermillion Fly
Dipper
CA gnatcatcher
All thrashers (except CA)
Hermit/Lucy's/B-t grey Warblers
Lawrences Goldfinch
Rosy Finch
also photo chances of shorebirds/Elegant Tern I have The Kemper
Birding Northern CA, and Shram Birders guide to Southern CA, any info
would be greatfully recieved, please e-mail me on
j.a.eaton@...

Thanks,

James Eaton


[EBN] interspecific owl competition

Cyril Schönbächler <troglodyte@...>
 

X-Mailer: Microsoft Outlook Express 5.00.2314.1300
X-Orcpt: rfc822;EUROBIRDNET@...
Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2000 11:05:31 +0200
Reply-To: Tor Bollingmo <tor.bollingmo@...>
Sender: EuroBirdnet - the list for Western Palearctic
birds and birdwatching <EUROBIRDNET@...>
From: Tor Bollingmo <tor.bollingmo@...>
Subject: [EBN] interspecific owl competition
To: EUROBIRDNET@...

Hi.

There´s an interesting story on suspected interspecific competition among
owl species at yesterdays CNN nature news pages:
http://www.cnn.com/2000/NATURE/08/08/owl.fight.ap/index.html
dealing with the endangered Northern Spotted Owl and the "invasive" Barred
Owl. I´m sure this may be of interest to the many European owl enthusiasts
as well. At the bottom of the page there are links to excellent additional
info on the two species written by Eric D. Forsman.

Tor B.


Gulls and Seabirds identification

Cyril Schönbächler <troglodyte@...>
 


White-faced IBis

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

AT noon yesterday, the UCSB overlook area of the Goleta Slough contained
about 40 Snowy Egrets, 10-12 Great Egrets, and one immature White-faced
Ibis. The Ibis was near the western end of the area, closer to the fire
station, and tended to feed in or right next to the clumps of exposed
vegetation. It could easily be missed.

The area is a little better for shorebirds, but still no exposed
mudflats. There were about a dozen Black-necked Stilts present
yesterday, along with a dozen Greater Yellowlegs and a possible Lesser
Yellowlegs (need a scope to confirm this visually, but the call is
distinctive). A scope is recommended for scanning the egrets closely
and for better shorebird identification.

I would recommend checking this area regularly from now on, for juvenile
shorebirds and possible vagrant waders up the might ciome north from
Baja California in post-breeding dispersal.

Florence


Area K - Goleta Slough

Kathleen Whitney <kwhit@...>
 

There was one Lesser Yellowlegs (a tricky fellow, often lurking behind clumps of vegetation so you have to be very patient to get a good look...) at Area K yesterday afternoon and two Wilson's Phalaropes. We missed the Ibis though, darn!!!!


Thursday birding

kbridgers <kbridgers@...>
 

Hi all

Joan Lentz and I were out this morning (Thursday).

We saw the White-faced Ibis at the UCSB overlook where Florence earlier
described it.

We walked upcreek on Atascadero Creek from the end of Walnut and between
there and the bend in the creek had between 10 and 15 Blue Grosbeaks and
probably as many Laz Buntings. This is a good spot to check for Indigo or
even Painted buntings as fall proceeds. We also had two Blue Grosbeaks just
downcreek from the Patterson bridge.

We checked Devereux but found nothing of interest.

Karen Bridgers
kbridgers@...


turkeys

Guy Tingos <GTingos@...>
 

There were about 15 Wild Turkeys on San Marcos Pass (Highway 154) this
morning about 7:30. They were along the road just west of where you can see
the east end of the lake. This is across from the former ostrich ranch, aka
Rancho Josoco. Guy


Oso FLaco and Santa Maria River Mouth, 8/11

Bill Bouton <wbouton@...>
 

Hi All,

This morning, Friday 8/11, at Oso Flaco Lake, the willows were extremely quiet, with nearly no passerines to be seen. At the lake itself, the only birds of note were one female REDHEAD and one juvenile LEAST TERN.

I birded the Santa Maria River Mouth, from about 09:00 to 10:30.

There was abundant good habitat: sand flats, mud flats, wet herbaceous vegetation, dry grass/herbs and open water. I think the river will need to break through soon, though, or the area will become completely inundated.

While I was there, the birds were harassed by NO Peregrine Falcons (yea)!

I saw no unexpected species. Species list at end of this post.

Cheers,

Bill Bouton
San Luis Obispo, CA, USA 93401
wbouton@...



At SM River Mouth:

Cinnamon Teal - 8
Northern Shoveler - 6
Gadwall - 15
Black-bellied Plover - 36
Snowy Plover - 6 feeding down on the mud flats
Semipalmated Plover - 10
Killdeer - 5
Black-necked Stilt - 4
American Avocet - 2
Greater Yellowlegs - 3
Willet - 12
Long-billed Curlew - 8
Marbled Godwit - 4
Sanderling - 10
Western Sandpiper - 500
Least Sandpiper - 200
Dowitcher sp. - 40-50 (those I heard call were Short-billed)
Red-necked Phalarope - 17
Caspian Tern - 3
plus assorted gulls and pelicans


Yellow-rumped Warbler

Gene Lynch <grlynch@...>
 

I'll take a few minutes off from painting the eaves of the house to post
this sighting from behind the paint roller.
This morning about 8:30 AM, while painting and listening to the Starlings
whistle (yes, I can hear them whistle, for those who know I'm "hearing
impaired"), and when I glanced up to the short-wave antenna of the neighbors
there was a different shape, so, as much as I love painting (?), I raced for
the lenses and brought them to bear on a Yellow-rumped Warbler. Very washed
out coloring, but the faint stripes on the breast/side were visible with a
wash of yellow, throat a dirty color, and the rump definitely yellow. Wing
bars faint.
Eye ring faint.
I haven't checked Lehman for dates, but I thought it unusual for August. For
those who want to try to find this particular bird, bring a brush and a
roller.
Gene Lynch


Re: Yellow-rumped Warbler

Jamie M Chavez <jcwings@...>
 

Greetings,

Not to be outdone by Gene, I also had a flyover Yellow-rumped Warbler
this morning at about 9:30 while working on a rooftop in Santa Maria
(competition over Yellow-rumped Warblers?). Working on rooftop air
conditioning equipment has its advantages (watching birds at eye level
in surrounding trees or flying by) and its disadvantages (cold, heat,
wind and rain). Unlike Gene, I never saw mine but heard the flight call
followed by those ubiquitous "chips" synonymous with yellow-rumps in
winter. I was surprised to hear this and suspected this was very early
for a fall migrant so I've looked it up. Paul mentions early fall
migrants arriving along the coast in early September. At the time of
publication of his book there were no records for August, as Gene has
suspected. But remember, these birds do breed in the county in
coniferous forest on the highest peaks so wandering birds are not out of
the question. I imagine most of them are still up there. There were
other birds on the move today. I heard a few Yellow Warblers going by
and a sparrow sp. call (Savannah possibly) so things are definitely
moving.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria
jcwings@...


Devereux & UCSB Area K overlook Sunday

sbtech@...
 

Hi All,

Devereux slough had about 100 Black-bellied Plovers and there were another
200 a mile up the beach near the Bacara Resort. About 120 Snowy Plovers were
at the Devereux slough mouth and another 20 were on the beach between
Devereux and Bacara. Of most interest to me were the 17 Least Terns resting
and feeding at the slough mouth all morning at least till 2PM. 9 of those
were juveniles. There were about 60 Semi-Palmated Plovers between Devereux
and Bacara.

Area K below the UCSB Firestation overlook is drying up and providing great
opportunities for shorebird and heron watching. This morning there were 85
Snowy Egrets, 15 Great Egrets, 5 Great Blue Herons, about 40 Black-necked
Stilts and 40+ Greater Yellowlegs. It's uplifting to see them milling about
in a large mixed flock. The habitat is starting to look great for Ruff if one
drops by.

Regards, Ron Hirst


Santa Maria River mouth, Sunday August 13

Dave Compton <davcompton@...>
 

A group of us (Brad Hines, Becky Hoban, Melissa Kelly, Joan Hardie, and I)
were at the Santa Maria River mouth Sunday morning and had lots of
interesting things, though nothing too surprising. The best bird was
probably a RED PHALAROPE moulting into basic plumage. First one I'd seen on
shore in some time. One BAIRD'S SANDPIPER was the first I'd heard of here
this season. There were at least two SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS and one
WHITE-FACED IBIS. Two RUDDY TURNSTONES in alternate plumage were also nice
to see. In all, we had at least 22 shorebird species.

Also, Brad Hines and Becky Hoban saw at least two PINK-FOOTED SHEARWATERS
from the parking lot before the rest of us arrived. They also saw a
PARASITIC JAEGER and a POMARINE JAEGER, I believe. After we finished at the
river mouth and returned to the parking lot, we witnessed a true spectacle.
An estimated 100,000 plus SOOTY SHEARWATERS were offshore. About 2,000 per
minute were moving northward at close range, while tens of thousands sat on
the water from just beyond the surf to as far as we could see. Groups of
PHALAROPES (hard to tell which kind this time of year) moved southward.
Further out, at least two whales were spouting. Brad and I saw what we
thought resembled a Humpbacked Whale at the surface, but we couldn't be
sure. The spouts seemed to be of two different types, one shorter and wider,
the other taller and very concentrated.


[Brad and Becky - sorry to presume to post this for you guy; I waited]

Dave Compton


UCSB Overlook

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

At noon today, the usual egret convention was present, this time more
concentrated toward the east end of the overlook. With the egrets was
one White-faced Ibis. This was not the immature bird seen last week;
rather, it is an adult. It still can be very difficult to see as it
feeds in and immediately around the vegetation.

Shorebirds continue to increase. With the Stilts and Greater Yellowlegs
near the eastern end was a small flock of Dowitchers (D. species without
a scope or identifying calls). At the western end, there were fewer
birds, but of an interesting variety. To the above, add 1 Lesser
Yellowlegs, 1 Wilson's Phalarope, a few small sandpipers (probably Least
Sandpiper from their coloring), 1 Kildeer, and a possible Solitary
Sandpiper at the back of the wet area. Patrick McNulty arrived with
scope as I had to leave and was off to check the shorebirds for better
identification.

This is a great spot right now, but a scope is definitely needed to
identify the shorebirds.

Florence Sanchez

PS Red Breasted Nuthatches are beeping in the pine trees in the Ellison
Hall courtyard outside my window as I write this.


Re: UCSB Overlook

Patrick McNulty <mcnulty-p@...>
 

Soon after Florence left at about 12:55, a second Ibis appeared which looked like it could be the immature bird she saw last week. It appeared intermittently among the weed in the middle of the eastern half, but both Ibis were visible at the same time.

In the little time I had left, I was unable to find either a Wilson's Phal. or the possible Solitary Sandpiper, but found everything else she mentions. heat wave shimmer was getting significant by 1:20.

Patrick

Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...> 8/14/00 1:18:29 PM >>>
At noon today, the usual egret convention was present, this time more
concentrated toward the east end of the overlook. With the egrets was
one White-faced Ibis. This was not the immature bird seen last week;
rather, it is an adult. It still can be very difficult to see as it
feeds in and immediately around the vegetation.

Shorebirds continue to increase. With the Stilts and Greater Yellowlegs
near the eastern end was a small flock of Dowitchers (D. species without
a scope or identifying calls). At the western end, there were fewer
birds, but of an interesting variety. To the above, add 1 Lesser
Yellowlegs, 1 Wilson's Phalarope, a few small sandpipers (probably Least
Sandpiper from their coloring), 1 Kildeer, and a possible Solitary
Sandpiper at the back of the wet area. Patrick McNulty arrived with
scope as I had to leave and was off to check the shorebirds for better
identification.

This is a great spot right now, but a scope is definitely needed to
identify the shorebirds.

Florence Sanchez

PS Red Breasted Nuthatches are beeping in the pine trees in the Ellison
Hall courtyard outside my window as I write this.





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sea birds and whales

Dave Compton <davcompton@...>
 

A group of us went on a blue whale trip on the channel out of Santa Barbara
yesterday (August 15). We thought you all might want to know what we saw.
The boat took us southwest to the area north of the Santa Rosa passage,
where we saw 6 or 7 BLUES WHALES, including great views of a mother and
calf, but little else. We then motored east to Painted Cave, before
returning northeast across the channel. If anyone out there goes out into
the channel, especially from July to October, I'd appreciate hearing about
what you see.

Here's the list:

Northern Fulmar - 1 (rare in summer in the channel)
Pink-footed Shearwater - ~125
Sooty Shearwater - ~250
Black-vented Shearwater - 4 (early fall arrivals)
Ashy Storm-petrel - 3
Black Storm-petrel - 4
Osprey - 1 (in the Santa Barbara harbor)
Black Oystercatcher - 2 (near the mouth to Painted Cave)
Wandering Tattler - 1 (at the harbor sandspit)
Red-necked Phalarope - 25
Red Phalarope - 2
Pomarine Jaeger - 3
Jaeger Sp. - 3
Sabine's Gull - 1
Pigeon Guillemot - 5
Cassin's Auklet - 1
Rhinoceros Auklet - 1
Hummingbird sp - 1 (several miles south of the west end of Santa Cruz,
making a bee-line for land)

All for now
Dave Compton


Birding at Santa Maria River Mouth and Estuary

Paloma Nieto <palomanieto@...>
 

Just wanted to let everyone know that the Santa Maria river mouth and
estuary are once again safe to access for birding without interfering with
plover and tern chicks. All plover chicks at Guadalupe have fledge and the
terns have left (only one juvenile left hanging out near Mussel Rock).

Thanks to all of you for your cooperation during this breeding season.

Paloma Nieto
Wildlife Biologist
palomanieto@...
(805) 929-5377

-- "He whose ear is untrained to hear the harmonious discord of the birds
travels alone when he might have company."


S.M. sewage ponds

Jamie M Chavez <jcwings@...>
 

Hi,

Every pond at the Santa Maria sewage plant continues to be completely
filled which doesn't help the shorebird situation but there are still
quite a few peeps around the perimeters. Two BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS were
present today at the noon hour. One in the sludge beds nearer to the
entrance and one along the shoreline of the new ponds at the west end.
Many juv. Least and Western sandpipers, a few Wilson's and Red-necked
Phalaropes, plus one remaining Black-necked Stilt. Savannah Sparrows are
beginning to come in there too. They aren't found there in summer.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria
jcwings@...


S.M. River Estuary 8/19

Jamie M Chavez <jcwings@...>
 

Hello all,

A combined Morro Coast Audubon Society and La Purisima Audubon Society
hike with 15 or so participants birded the Santa Maria River estuary on
Saturday morning. Highlights include:

One scruffy and partially oiled RED PHALAROPE,
Up to three juv. BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS,
Many Least and Western Sandpipers and possibly one Semipalmated
Sandpiper (that one was mine- couldn't get close enough to positively
ID),
Short-billed Dowitchers,
Willets, Marbled Godwits, Long-billed Curlews, and a Whimbrel,
Snowy and Semipalmated Plovers,
Many Red-necked Phalaropes,
Up to four Black-necked Stilts including two juv. (probably fledged
there SLO Co. side),
Several Northern Shovelers,
Elegant Terns,
TWO Peregrine Falcons,
One Pink-footed Shearwater and one Black-vented Shearwater picked out
from the Sooty's offshore.
Common Murre.
Yellow Warblers and Wilson's Warblers are still singing in the willows
near the entrance gate.

Did I miss anything folks?

Good birding,

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria
jcwings@...