Date   
Snowy Plovers at East Beach

Dika Golovatchoff
 

Strolling along the beach just below Chase Palm Park I counted at least 20 Western Snowy Plovers, first foraging along waterline then resting in dry sand.  I don't remember having seen them at this part of the beach before.  Also seen were 4 Killdeer, a Spotted Sandpiper, the expected Western Gulls, Coots, Mallards, Grackles in the outflow near Stearn's Wharf.  A Western Meadowlark was seen briefly on the grass by sidewalk.  A few photos at: https://flickr.com/photos/digolov

Dika Golovatchoff, Santa Barbara

Recent birds

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

 

On Friday and Sunday AMs I spent about an hour at Gaviota checking the drinking spot on the creek and the campground, hoping for a repeat of last year’s magic. No such luck, with the best birds being 2 Lawrence’s Goldfinch and a Yellow Warbler. Yesterday I looked for Joan’s ruber RB Sapsucker but could only come with 1-2 of the normal variety as well as a couple of RB Nuthatches.

 

Nick Lethaby

Texas Instruments

6750 Navigator Way, Suite 250

Goleta, CA  93117

USA

 

Email: nlethaby@...

Office: +1 805 562 5106

Mobile: +1 805 284 6200

 


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Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mitchell Road

John Deacon
 

All:

I checked in at Mitchell Road in Orcutt today and found a couple of cool species.  Ferruginous Hawks are back and, as usual, are very tame.  The pic I took for this EBird submittal was from only about 40'.  I was excited to find Yellow Headed Blackbirds by the horse corral.  

Checklist is here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S61011610

John Deacon
Orcutt

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John Deacon
Orcutt

Re: Mitchell Road

Wim van Dam
 

For those wondering: FEHA = Ferruginous Hawk. 

Wim


On Mon, Oct 28, 2019 at 9:39 AM John Deacon via Groups.Io <iseekbirds=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
FEHAs are back at Mitchell Road and as usual are photo friendly. Also two Yellow Headed Blackbirds are in the blackbird mix by the horse corral.   If you are in the North County today, might be worth a look.

John Deacon
Orcutt


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John Deacon
Orcutt




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Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

Mitchell Road

John Deacon
 

FEHAs are back at Mitchell Road and as usual are photo friendly. Also two Yellow Headed Blackbirds are in the blackbird mix by the horse corral. If you are in the North County today, might be worth a look.

John Deacon
Orcutt


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John Deacon
Orcutt

"Ruber" subspecies of Red-breasted Sapsucker at Stow Grove Park this morning

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
Libby Patten and I got out to do some birding at Stow Grove Park, where I got my first really good look at the Northern (“Ruber”) subspecies of the Red-breasted Sapsucker. Typically, we see the Daggetti subspecies of the sapsucker, which appears to breed in our local mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Ruber is more northerly, not breeding south of the Bay Area and ranging into AK.
Anyway, this Ruber subsp. sapsucker was so intensely red on the head and upper breast and then a BRIGHT yellow upper breast and belly, that I was blown away — so different from the typical Daggetti. We didn’t see the yellow spots that are supposed to be visible on the back of the Ruber, whereas the Daggetti has white spots. But just seeing this brilliant contrast between the two subspecies was so interesting.
The two birds were interacting in a small pittosporum tree on the fringe of the inner redwood section towards the
northeast corner of the park; therefore, they were south of the big green lawn area at the north end of the park.
According to BOSBC, Lehman’s book, there are only three records of Ruber sightings in our county prior to this.

Joan Lentz
Santa Barbara

Red Crossbill

Lisa Nelms <Drnelms@...>
 

Hi, I spotted this Red Crossbill today around 1:00pm @ the San Marcos Foothill Preserve.
I believe it’s an adult male. I had never seen one before, but his beautiful color caught my eye as he landed on this treetop.
I apologize for the poor image quality as he was quite far away.
Lisa Nelms. Santa Barbara.

Los Alamos - second hand report of Varied Thrush and another mid county Bald Eagle

Peter Schneekloth
 

I started the morning going over Drum Canyon to Los Alamos County Park. I spent some time going through many juncos and sparrows at the park and near the cemetery with nothing really notable. I ran into a new birder and Los Alamos resident Steve. He that told me he had started seeing Varied Thrush in the park within the last few weeks.

From there I took Cat Canyon, to Palmar to Foxen canyon. This is some of the same area I covered on the 16th of October when I found two Bald Eagles. I found another bird today about 9 miles as the eagle flies from where I saw those initial birds. Today's perched bird did not show any blue tags like the bird with white head on the 16th. I went back and looked at photo's and the bird from the 16th had blue tags top and bottom of wing that should have been visible on todays bird. So I am thinking this is a third Bald Eagle. A look at the distant perched bird here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/48964203546/in/dateposted-public/

Nothing else of note seen on the route.

Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

Summer Tanager near Coronado Dr.

Ryan Seppala
 

There is a female Summer Tanager high up in the eucs east of Coronado Dr. and slightly southwest of Elwood Beach Dr., right at the bend as you reach the willows. It’s silent and fairly difficult to track. 


Ryan Seppala
UCSB

More on LLC Friday & GSD Tuesday and a ??

David Levasheff
 

10/25 8:30-10:00

Rob Lindsay and I crossed paths, I entering, he leaving yesterday.

Like Mark yesterday at NCOS there was a notable number of White-crowned Sparrows. They were with numerous Yellow-rumped warblers on the west side of Stow House and on the lawn over to the RR museum.

WCSPs were very active in the olive trees on the road from Stow House to the lake. There were also a bunch below the dam on the south west end. As Mark noted at NCOS, they were feeding furiously.

Other birds of note:
3 Golden-crowned Sparrows - east end of dam up by trash can
1 Great-tailed Grackle
6 Ring-necked Ducks in the far north of the lake
1 Cinnamon Teal west lake in reeds
3 Green Heron
2 Blue-winged Teal
2 Sora heard
1 White-tailed Kite in tree SW dam area
1 White-tailed Kite in star pine (same bird?) calling
Pied-billed Grebe (close to 10)
1 Northern Harrier flying low over the lake
1 Cooper's Hawk on far west of property
1 Red-shouldered Hawk south of the Dam
1 Lincoln's Sparrow
1 possible Western Kingbird
and the other usual birds including about 75 Coot.

Tuesday 10/22 Jeff and I stopped at the Goleta Sanitary District and found lots of ducks there. Most were sleeping on the path between the dam and it was damn hot so we did not linger to get exact counts. Present were at least a dozen Blue-winged Teal, almost as many Green-winged Teal, several American Wigeon and Northern Shoveler. There is no mud flat area so no peeps, thought I saw some fly, but could not re-find them. Only one Western Gull and a single Eared Grebe. 2-3 Spotted Sandpiper.

So here is a question. Lehman's book says Ring-billed Gull start arriving in August. Jeff and I have been looking and looking for any sign of one. Have not been successful. Has anyone seen one (or more) this fall?

Cheers and good birding

--

David



--
David Levasheff
Santa Barbara

Major Fallout at NCOS

Mark Holmgren
 

UCSB’s North Campus Open Space exposed a major ornithological event this morning (Thursday) as we conducted the monthly survey there.  Yesterday (Wednesday) morning Glenn Kincaid birded NCOS. See https://ebird.org/checklist/S60892831 

 

To describe this fallout event, Glenn Kincaid’s birding effort lasted 75 minutes on Wednesday morning starting at 8:43 am.  

He encountered many of the same animals in similar numbers as we did on our survey of the eastern half of NCOS. Except for White-crowned Sparrows and Yellow-rumped Warblers!  On Wednesday Glenn recorded 24 and 9 of those two species. 

This morning starting at 8:03 am our totals for only the eastern half of NCOS were 169 WcSp and 157 YrWa.  They were everywhere, mostly on the more moist ground vegetation and in the low shrubs.  Toward the end of today’s survey (by 9:30 am) the huge numbers of both species were back to ‘normal’.  Most individuals had lifted and were gone.  No other species showed this fallout effect.

 

Does this event say something about the new restoration at NCOS?  It must have looked attractive to the large number of migrants in the air.  Did it have great food?  That’s less clear, although the birds we watched were feeding furiously before they vacated.

 

Bird NCOS starting here on Whittier Ave, off Storke Rd: https://tinyurl.com/y4qd8e5f


Mark Holmgren

Santa Barbara

Armour Ranch Rd, 2019-10-25

Wim van Dam
 

This afternoon I quickly checked Armour Ranch Rd to see how the winter arrivals are doing in our current 90+ Fahrenheit. All I managed was a murder  of 18 COMMON RAVEN, a PEREGRINE FALCON, 2 AMERICAN KESTREL, a few RED-TAILED HAWK, and close to 30 WESTERN MEADOWLARK. Notable was the complete absence of Sparrows and Bluebirds.  

Wim

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Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #385: Neotropic Cormorant

Lake Los Carneros Friday morning

Robert Lindsay
 

10/25, 7:30-9:00 am

Lake Los Carneros was mostly quiet today. The best bird on most of the walk was a single Myrtle Warbler among the fairly abundant Yellow-rumps. But I did hear several Virginia Rail calling as I circled the lake. There was one hot spot, the bay to the east of the dam. Here I saw two Greater Yellowlegs, 7 Short-billed Dowtcher (there may have been a Long-billed but I never got a good enough look to be sure), a Green Heron, a pair of Cinnamon Teal, a Sora chasing a Virginia Rail, a Wilson's Snipe, and a White-faced Ibis. The Ibis flew off towards the Goleta Slough while I was there.
Other birds seen around the lake included an Allen's Hummingbird, a California Thrasher, Red-tailed, Red-shouldered and Cooper's Hawk, a California Thrasher, and a particularly well-marked Golden-crowned Sparrow along with a number of other very common species.

That's all,
Rob Lindsay

Harris Sparrow at Las Cruzitas

Cruz Phillips
 

I have an adult Harris Sparrow at the feeding station in front of my house today at 1 pm.

Cruz Phillips
Las Cruzitas Ranch

SBCC

Bradley Hacker
 

I want to put in a plug for SBCC as a good local birding spot. The southeast corner in particular has an impressive range of “habitats” and non-native vegetation of different types, plus a veg garden, a bird-friendly fountain and a weed patch. Those of you who follow ebird will know that there was a European Goldfinch photo’d here on the 22nd; I saw that bird briefly yesterday, but today I could not find it. You can pay to park on campus, but you can also park at Pershing Park and walk up the stairs. Anyway, I think this place is worth more looking than it’s been getting. 


--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

Kinevan Road Oct. 24

Florence Sanchez
 

I walked Kinevan Road this morning. hoping to avoid some of the forecast heat and also hoping that I would see the Pacific Wren Mark Holmgren found earlier this week.  It was definitely nice and cool in the canyon to start, but it warmed up significantly by the end of my morning there.

Bird activity was generally slow, partly because this time of year, the canyon does not receive much sunshine until after mid-morning. Still I found a little activity at the first bridge and in various patches along the walk down the road to the second bridge (past the intersection with West Camino Cielo Road).   Birder of interest included Steller's Jays, both White and Red-breasted Nuthatches, Hermit Thrushes, two Canyon Wrens, multiple Ruby-crowned Kinglets, Hutton's Vireo, Orange-crowned, Yellow-rumped, and Townsend's Warblers and 4 species of Woodpecker.

I had two surprises.  While walking down the road, I heard a bird sing twice that sounded like one of the Cassin's Vireos that I heard last spring (and which may have nested there).  It would be unusual for a bird to sing this time of year, but the song was coming from a sunnier patch on the far side of the Canyon and in the same location of last spring's Vireos.  It lacked the up-down quality of the similar Western Tanager song.

The other surprise came while I was looking for the Pacific Wren near the pool where Mark found it.  Suddenly, I heard the sound of rushing water, like someone had turned on a hose full force.  I discovered that water had started to gush out of a small pipe at the top of the opposite creek bank.  The water continued to run in a cascade down the bank, eventually disappearing in the vegetation.  The effect on birdlife was immediate.  Birds started coming to the spot to drink and bathe and within a few minutes, I'd seen 2 RB Nuthatches, 3 Kinglets, 1 Hutton's Vireo, 1 Junco, 1 Spotted Towhee, 1 Orange-crowned Warbler, and a Townsend's Warbler there.  I stood and watched for almost a half hour, during which the water continued to flow.  Activity eventually slowed way down, so I left to go back up the canyon and I don't know how much longer the cascade went on.  However, it might be worth checking this spot again if you are in the canyon to see if the flood is repeated.  Water on a dry hot day is like a magnet.

I attach a snapshot of the area below.  It's just immediately upstream from the pool where Mark had the Pacific Wren, opposite the red and white house complex on the far bank.

Florence Sanchez



Area CBCs

Rebecca Coulter
 

Greetings birders,
As the leaves fall and the temperatures turn chilly…well, as the leaves fall…we turn our thoughts to Christmas Bird Counts! Here is a list of dates for area CBCs with links to information pages if available. 

Sat December 14: Carpinteria 
Sun December 15: La Purisima
Sun December 22: Santa Maria-Guadalupe (contact John Deacon via email)
Fri December 27: Cachuma (page to be updated soon)
Sat January 4: Santa Barbara (also Ventura)

Good birding,
Rebecca Coulter
SB

Fw: [sbcobirding] Coronado puddle and Atascadero Creek

Florence Sanchez
 



----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Florence Sanchez <sanchezucsb11@...>
To: David Levasheff <levaweb@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2019, 04:52:52 PM PDT
Subject: Re: [sbcobirding] Coronado puddle and Atascadero Creek

Correction:  Oak titmouse!

Florence


On Wednesday, October 23, 2019, 04:27:59 PM PDT, David Levasheff <levaweb@...> wrote:


Tufted Titmouse?

David
On 10/23/2019 3:14 PM, Florence Sanchez via Groups.Io wrote:
I walked along Atascadero Creek between Ward Drive and Patterson this morning, but it was failry quiet and I had little of interest there.

I then parked at the end of Ellwood Beach Road and walked the trail from there to the Coronado puddle.  There was a lot of bird activity near the puddle but I did not find  the Black and White Warbler reported earlier.  Some of the birds that came to the puddle this morning were a Red-breasted Nuthatch, Ruby-crowed Kinglets, Chectnut-backed Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, California Towhee, Orange Crowned Warbler, at least 2 different Yellow-rumps, 1 Common Yellowthroat, and at least 2 different Townsend's Warblers.  Munia were abundant all around.

The puddle is very small now, only at the base of the culvert, so it's hard to see the birds bathing wihtout spooking them.  However, most pop up into the vegetation after bathing and are faily easy to see then.

Florence Sanchez

Coronado puddle and Atascadero Creek

Florence Sanchez
 

I walked along Atascadero Creek between Ward Drive and Patterson this morning, but it was failry quiet and I had little of interest there.

I then parked at the end of Ellwood Beach Road and walked the trail from there to the Coronado puddle.  There was a lot of bird activity near the puddle but I did not find  the Black and White Warbler reported earlier.  Some of the birds that came to the puddle this morning were a Red-breasted Nuthatch, Ruby-crowed Kinglets, Chectnut-backed Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, California Towhee, Orange Crowned Warbler, at least 2 different Yellow-rumps, 1 Common Yellowthroat, and at least 2 different Townsend's Warblers.  Munia were abundant all around.

The puddle is very small now, only at the base of the culvert, so it's hard to see the birds bathing wihtout spooking them.  However, most pop up into the vegetation after bathing and are faily easy to see then.

Florence Sanchez

Link to today’s LA Times article re gulls at Channel Islands

Ria Marsh