Date   
Re: Get outside if u can!

Nick Lethaby
 

Refugio Canyon was pretty quiet this morning, although I had my first pewee, 5 Nashvilles, and 3 Hammond's (two were heard only)


On Fri, Apr 17, 2020, 2:34 PM Joan Lentz (cox.net address) <joanlentz@...> wrote:
Hey Birders:  It’s insane with all these Western Tanagers, Nashville Warblers, and Black-headed Grosbeaks on the move.  Libby Patten reported that Merida Dr was going off like crazy at all the bottlebrush trees there.
        My tree is still playing host to what appears to be a wave of migrants that keeps on moving thru.
        Dying to know if they came up the canyons today, got held back by the low clouds or what?       
        I think there was a southeast wind pushing them along last night, so we’re now getting this daytime movement, and the birds are hesitant due to the cloud cover?  I don’t get it.
        My pond is insane with orioles, tanagers, Nashville’s, a White-crowned Sparrow, when I haven’t seen any in my yard for days, etc., etc.
        Please go outside!

        Joan Lentz
        Montecito




--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Get outside if u can!

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hey Birders: It’s insane with all these Western Tanagers, Nashville Warblers, and Black-headed Grosbeaks on the move. Libby Patten reported that Merida Dr was going off like crazy at all the bottlebrush trees there.
My tree is still playing host to what appears to be a wave of migrants that keeps on moving thru.
Dying to know if they came up the canyons today, got held back by the low clouds or what?
I think there was a southeast wind pushing them along last night, so we’re now getting this daytime movement, and the birds are hesitant due to the cloud cover? I don’t get it.
My pond is insane with orioles, tanagers, Nashville’s, a White-crowned Sparrow, when I haven’t seen any in my yard for days, etc., etc.
Please go outside!

Joan Lentz
Montecito

Current migrant push

Adam Searcy
 

Hi all,
I’m skywatching/yard birding near State and Valerio Streets and In the past 45 minutes have seen some good waves of diurnal migrants:

100 Western Kingbird
125 Vaux’s Swifts
150 swallows
125 high flying Common Loon
1 Swainson’s Hawk

And a Scattering of other species. Flocks of birds are still streaming by, so it’s perhaps worth doing some skywatching today as I assume there isn’t anything magical about State and Valerio!

Good birding,

Adam Searcy
Santa Barbara, CA
Serpophaga@...

Tufted Duck

John Deacon
 

A couple of birders have reported that the Tufted Duck continues at the A Street Ponds in Santa Maria.

John Deacon
iseekbirds@...

--
John Deacon
Orcutt

Farren Road highlights

Guy Tingos
 

There was a nice bit of activity along Farren Road this morning. Betsy and I had 3 Nashville Warblers and a male Hermit Warbler in the oaks across from the reservoir, 15-20 Western Kingbirds past the reservoir, 6 Lazuli Buntings, several Ash-throated Flycatchers, 2 Ravens, and small flocks of both swifts.

Guy Tingos
Santa Barbara

--
Guy Tingos
Santa Barbara

mayhem at the bottlebrush tree tonight

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:  For some reason, tonight was again packed with birds feeding at the bottlebrush tree in my backyard.  Western Tanagers were added to the mix, along with a robust push of Black-headed Grosbeaks, quite a few hummers, including the Calliope male that’s been here for two prior days, or maybe this is a new one, plus gobs of Bullock’s Orioles.  These birds are quiet and busy.  They fly into the tree from the east and out usually to the west. However, I also saw some birds coming back in to revisit, so counting individuals was terribly difficult!  It was busy most of the day, but I sat down to do a list from 5:30 pm for about 45 mins.  By the time I’d left, most of the birds had gone, with the exception of the hummers, which hang out as long as they can.
I wish I could send a photo of my bottelbrush tree, but I can’t put it into eBird and I don’t do Flickr.  I wish I could post that here?  But I guess not possible.
In any case, this is an isolated instance of birds feeding off a conspicuous source and they’re headed on out.  Oh, and I forgot the Nashvilles, a nice several of them.  NO other warblers!
Good birding!
Joan Lentz
Montecito

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Tufted Duck (3 reports)
- Solitary Sandpiper (1 report)
- Hammond's Flycatcher (2 reports)
- Tropical Kingbird (1 report)
- Red-eyed Vireo (1 report)
- Fox Sparrow (Sooty) (1 report)
- Orchard Oriole (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 15:23 by Jamie Chavez
- A St. ponds, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9298363,-120.4626539&ll=34.9298363,-120.4626539
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67326817
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Drake in the smaller of the two A Street ponds. Reported to me by John Deacon who found the bird a short time earlier. This was a striking duck with a purplish glossy head color and a prominent shaggy tuft of feathers extending off the back of the head. It had a black back with bright white sides and black at the rump and undertail coverts. The breast was black. It had a golden-yellow iris. The bill was gray-blue with a black nail at the tip of the bill. Photos"

Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 14:31 by Erik Dodos
- A St. ponds, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9298363,-120.4626539&ll=34.9298363,-120.4626539
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67324556
- Comments: "Observed with John Deacon. Adult male with tuft."

Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 14:28 by John Deacon
- A St. ponds, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9298363,-120.4626539&ll=34.9298363,-120.4626539
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67324370
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Striking Male. Black back and white sides. Tuft clearly visible. At this location, the bird is 20-60 yards from vantage point."

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) (3)
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 12:30 by Anonymous eBirder
- Caliente Ranch Wetland, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9901746,-119.8007052&ll=34.9901746,-119.8007052
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67328531
- Media: 6 Photos
- Comments: "Small Tringa with needle bills, and white below. In flight barred side to tail visible. Distinctive call"

Hammond's Flycatcher (Empidonax hammondii) (1)
- Reported Apr 11, 2020 09:00 by Anonymous eBirder
- Bates Canyon Rd south of campground, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9278637,-119.9076127&ll=34.9278637,-119.9076127
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67063296
- Comments: "Small dark empid, with long-seeming wing. Silent. Small eye-ring (not oval like Pac-Slope). In forest edge at second hairpin. Zone 6"

Hammond's Flycatcher (Empidonax hammondii) (1)
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 14:31 by Mark Holmgren
- Big Pine Rd 34.74659 -119.62078 at 5372 feet, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.74679,-119.62055&ll=34.74679,-119.62055
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67312810
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Conforms to Hammond's: long primary extension, greenish back, small bill; lacks white outer tail edges of Dusky. I did not see the front of the bird."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus)
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 08:30 by Dennis Doordan
- UC Santa Barbara--Campus Lagoon, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4076516,-119.845165&ll=34.4076516,-119.845165
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67321849
- Comments: "Clear view of perched bird; longer bill and more yellow on the chest than Cassin's"

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 18:20 by Michael I Christie
- Vandenberg Village--golf course, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.712364,-120.45768&ll=34.712364,-120.45768
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67296288
- Comments: "'typical': gray cap with blackish edges, long white contrasting eyebrow, dark eye-stripe with lighter eye [though I did not notice it as red ] ; weaker stripe below the eye ; pale yellowish underside ; plain olive green back and wings ; no wing-bars. Active in oak branch at eye level, I saw it very clearly."

Fox Sparrow (Sooty) (Passerella iliaca [unalaschcensis Group]) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 08:51 by Mark Holmgren
- Buckhorn Rd at Alamo Cyn 34.77419 -119.59740 at 3619 feet, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.775031,-119.596384&ll=34.775031,-119.596384
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67310918
- Comments: "The rich, chocolaty variety of Sooty. Is that altivagans?"

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) (1)
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 08:09 by Mario Borunda
- Santa Monica Creek, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4070435,-119.5278168&ll=34.4070435,-119.5278168
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67330428
- Comments: "Continuing"

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) (1)
- Reported Apr 16, 2020 08:09 by Rob Denholtz
- Santa Monica Creek, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4070435,-119.5278168&ll=34.4070435,-119.5278168
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67312338
- Comments: "Continuing"

***********

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Goleta birds Thursday PM

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

I did some late afternoon birding around Goleta. Area K still had most of the wintering duck species. Not much at Goleta Beach, but a walk out to Campus Point produced 51 Surfbirds and 14 Black Turnstones. There was a good Pac Loon movement going with 400 birds in about 15 minutes.

I had a good check around Winchester Canyon for hummers after Guy and Joan's reports. Although there are still moderate numbers of Rufous, their numbers are down allowing other species to use the Bottlebrush trees. I had 12 BC Hummers scattered around along with single male and female Calliopes. BH Gtosbeaks and Bullock:s Orioles were much in evidence.

Nick

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Re: Carpinteria and Campus Point Seawatch

Linus Blomqvist
 

I had a similar seawatching experience as Florence this morning. I spent about 45 minutes at Coal Oil Point starting around 8am and saw a total of just over 700 loons, so they were passing by at a rate of about 1000 per hour. I'd expect it to have been going on for at least an hour before and some time after so probably a few thousand loons passed by this morning. I was only able to positively ID about 20% of them and they were almost all pacific, plus 11 common loons and 1 red-throated. The other 570 loon sp. were passing father out but also looked like pacific. Another highlight were 186 brant passing by pretty close to shore in three large flocks, plus a total of 140 surf scoters.

______________
Linus Blomqvist


On Thu, Apr 16, 2020 at 4:15 PM Florence Sanchez via groups.io <sanchezucsb11=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I checked out Bates Road this morning but didn't stay long as there was a rather scruffy person sobering up next to the traffic control gate.  He had obviously spent the night there.  A lot of Hummingbird activity was going on in the Giant Echiums, but I saw nothing but Anna's.  I thought I heard the distinctive wing whir of a Black-chinned at one point, but could not locate the bird.I went to Carpinteria creek next but it was pretty quiet.  I watched a female Allen's gathering cotton from a willow catkin.  She flew slightly downstream to a Sycamore-willow thicket and disappeared.  I suspect she was furbishing a nest.  I decided not go to to Santa Monica Creek--sounds like that's the Carp location to have visited.  

After reading Rob Lindsay's report of the seabird activity at Campus Point yesterday, I decided to head there myself.  Compared to what he had, the ocean was pretty quiet.  However, I eventually realized that way out to sea, loons were still flying west in small groups from time to time, though activity was not constant.  Even through my scope at 40 power, I had to make most of them Loon sp., but some flocks came in a little closer and those that did were all Pacific Loons, so I expect the rest were also.  

Closer in, I had a few Brants and three flocks of Surf Scoters flying by.  There also were a few single Brandt's Cormorants flying west fairly close in and I suspect these were denizens of the breeding platforms near Haskell's Beach.  In addition, I had fly-bys of 3 Pelagic Cormorants in very close, one right over the rocks at Campus Point.  I have had singles of Pelagic Cormorants in close on almost every seawatch this spring, even the on the deadest days, and I wonder if possibly we have a pair or two using the nesting platforms this year?

This morning, the stars of the show were Surfbirds on the rocks at Campus Point,  Initially I counted 22 of them, which is a good number.  With them were about a dozen Black Turnstones, 2 Semi-palmated Plovers, 10 or so Sanderlings going from the sand to the rocks and back again, 2 Greater Yellowlegs, 1 Whimbrel, 1 Willet, and a flyby of 3 Marbled Godwits.  After about an hour, I heard the commotion of more Surfbirds and the two flocks joined on a couple of smaller rocks at the east end of the Point.  I counted this larger flock twice and came up with first 59, then 65.  I think that's the most Surfbirds I've ever had in one place.  All were in breeding plumage.  

I kept telling myself, "there has to be a Tattler in there somewhere," but none made an appearance.  I haven't seen a one this spring--has anyone else?  Nonetheless, it was a delightful 2 hours of birding.

Florence Sanchez





Carpinteria and Campus Point Seawatch

Florence Sanchez
 

I checked out Bates Road this morning but didn't stay long as there was a rather scruffy person sobering up next to the traffic control gate.  He had obviously spent the night there.  A lot of Hummingbird activity was going on in the Giant Echiums, but I saw nothing but Anna's.  I thought I heard the distinctive wing whir of a Black-chinned at one point, but could not locate the bird.I went to Carpinteria creek next but it was pretty quiet.  I watched a female Allen's gathering cotton from a willow catkin.  She flew slightly downstream to a Sycamore-willow thicket and disappeared.  I suspect she was furbishing a nest.  I decided not go to to Santa Monica Creek--sounds like that's the Carp location to have visited.  

After reading Rob Lindsay's report of the seabird activity at Campus Point yesterday, I decided to head there myself.  Compared to what he had, the ocean was pretty quiet.  However, I eventually realized that way out to sea, loons were still flying west in small groups from time to time, though activity was not constant.  Even through my scope at 40 power, I had to make most of them Loon sp., but some flocks came in a little closer and those that did were all Pacific Loons, so I expect the rest were also.  

Closer in, I had a few Brants and three flocks of Surf Scoters flying by.  There also were a few single Brandt's Cormorants flying west fairly close in and I suspect these were denizens of the breeding platforms near Haskell's Beach.  In addition, I had fly-bys of 3 Pelagic Cormorants in very close, one right over the rocks at Campus Point.  I have had singles of Pelagic Cormorants in close on almost every seawatch this spring, even the on the deadest days, and I wonder if possibly we have a pair or two using the nesting platforms this year?

This morning, the stars of the show were Surfbirds on the rocks at Campus Point,  Initially I counted 22 of them, which is a good number.  With them were about a dozen Black Turnstones, 2 Semi-palmated Plovers, 10 or so Sanderlings going from the sand to the rocks and back again, 2 Greater Yellowlegs, 1 Whimbrel, 1 Willet, and a flyby of 3 Marbled Godwits.  After about an hour, I heard the commotion of more Surfbirds and the two flocks joined on a couple of smaller rocks at the east end of the Point.  I counted this larger flock twice and came up with first 59, then 65.  I think that's the most Surfbirds I've ever had in one place.  All were in breeding plumage.  

I kept telling myself, "there has to be a Tattler in there somewhere," but none made an appearance.  I haven't seen a one this spring--has anyone else?  Nonetheless, it was a delightful 2 hours of birding.

Florence Sanchez





SM Tufted Duck

Wes Fritz
 

SB Birders,

Here is one image of John Deacon’s Tufted Duck from the “A” Street Ponds.



Thank you for reporting your birds in a timely manner.

Good birding.

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

Re: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Tufted Duck

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

Great find. I assume it is a male. Perhaps the bird from the south coast heading N. 

On Apr 16, 2020 2:24 PM, "John Deacon via groups.io" <iseekbirds@...> wrote:
All. There is a nice Tufted Duck at A Street pond in Santa Maria.


--
John Deacon
Orcutt




--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Tufted Duck

John Deacon
 

All. There is a nice Tufted Duck at A Street pond in Santa Maria.


--
John Deacon
Orcutt

Carpinteria highlights

Rob Denholtz
 

Thu., April 16, 2020

This morning, Mario, Andrea and I birding a small section of the Santa Monica Creek bike path, then went over to Tee Time.

The bike path was alive with Hooded, Bullock’s, and an Orchard Oriole and also Western Tanagers.  More in one place than I’ve seen before.  

We went to Tee Time to look for warblers but found only Yellow-rumps.  Highlight there was a crisp Chipping Sparrow teed up to the west of the flower fields.  

https://ebird.org/checklist/S67316545



Rob Denholtz
Carp

--
Rob Denholtz
Carpinteria

Crowned sparrows are leaving Las Cruzitas

Cruz Phillips
 

So, yesterday I said the numbers of crowned sparrows have not gone down when I counted 60+ white crowned, 8 golden crowned and 2 White-throated.  This morning I had 28 White-crowned, 2 Golden-crowned, and no White-throated.  That is usually how it goes .  They leave in big groups over a few days.

Happy Birding,

Cruz

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Solitary Sandpiper (1 report)
- Hammond's Flycatcher (2 reports)
- Orchard Oriole (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) (1)
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 11:30 by Anonymous eBirder
- Caliente Ranch Wetland, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9901746,-119.8007052&ll=34.9901746,-119.8007052
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67280301
- Comments: "Small Tringa with thin bill, white below, eyering. Fairly regular in this location in spring"

Hammond's Flycatcher (Empidonax hammondii) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 18:15 by Anonymous eBirder
- Aliso Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9089576,-119.7673745&ll=34.9089576,-119.7673745
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67291645
- Comments: "Amazingly the fourth HAFL seen today. Small grey-green empid with eye-ring. Silent. Tail flicked up several times. Foraging in forest edge near gate. Long primaries. Dark bill"

Hammond's Flycatcher (Empidonax hammondii) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 09:00 by Anonymous eBirder
- Bates Canyon Rd south of campground, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9278637,-119.9076127&ll=34.9278637,-119.9076127
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67279837
- Media: 6 Photos
- Comments: "Probably three birds - all in first half-mile along road, present in same locations on way back as on way up. Small empids with long primaries. One bird made a few weak songs (as in 3rd recording on ibird). Photos show one bird with more extensive yellow on the bill than the other."

Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 15, 2020 07:15 by John Callender
- Santa Monica Creek, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4070435,-119.5278168&ll=34.4070435,-119.5278168
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S67240786
- Media: 4 Photos, 1 Audio
- Comments: "Continuing in the trees along the bike path south of El Carro Lane. Singing a distinctly sweeter-sounding song than the vocalizations being made by the nearby Bullock’s Orioles."

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Hummingbird sextet

Guy Tingos
 

This evening we had males of the 6 expected hummingbirds in our yard: Anna’s, Allen’s, Rufous, Calliope, Black-chinned, and Costa’s. Nice show!

Guy Tingos
Santa Barbara

--
Guy Tingos
Santa Barbara

Campus Point 4/15

Robert Lindsay
 

I went down for a quick look at UCSB Campus Point this morning at low tide (10:00-10:30 am). On the beach below the Marine Sciences building were 12 Black Turnstone and numerous other shorebirds (Marbled Godwit, Sanderling, Semipalmated Plover, and Western Sandpiper). On the rocks at campus point were two groups of Surfbirds, at least 28 total individuals. Out to sea was a constant wave of seabirds heading north. Most were loons though I did see one group of about 15 Surf Scoter. Most of the loons were too far out for me to identify but the few that were close enough were Red-throated. In less than 10 minutes I counted over 300 in group after group and the stream showed no signs of abating when I stopped counting. Either I hit it at a very opportune moment or there are A LOT birds on the move in our region today.

That's all,
Rob Lindsay

Lots of hummers and other stuff at Las Cruzitas

Cruz Phillips
 

Hi folks,

I stopped counting at 70 hummers last night.  6 were Black-Chinned, 2 were Costas, 12 were Rufous type, and the rest were Anna's.  The number of Rufous are going down now, but the total number of hummers is going up.  First Rufous showed up the 14th of Feb., first female Rufous the 6th of March.  I had one freak early Costas on the 11th of March, otherwise they showed up yesterday.  Black-Chinned arrived on April 7.

The crowned sparrows are all still here in similar numbers, and the two White-throateds are still around.  Black birds are leaving with the last day I saw my Tri-colored blackbird being April 6.  My last pine siskin left two days ago.  The Say's Pheobe on my porch is singing his head off, but if no girl shows up I expect he will move on soon.

Spring arrivals have included Hooded Orioles on March 6, Bullock's Orioles on March 20 and Black-Headed Grosbeaks on March 26.  Lawrence's Goldfinches were first seen in pairs on March 9, but we had a few wintering so I don't know when was the first migrant.  A  pair is hanging out near where they nested last year.  One weird note about Lawrence's is they are the only passarine that I see frequenting the salt licks set out for livestock.  And the pair that nested last year nested near the salt and was on it frequently.

A female Acorn Woodpecker came to my hummingbird feeder yesterday with three very brown juveniles, the first sign of fledglings getting out and about.  The pair of White-tailed Kites, which have nested for the last two years, are back and seem to be nesting again.  

Sorry I have been so negligent re: posting.  Enjoy your birding,

Cruz
Las Cruzitas Ranch
Santa Ynez


male Calliope in my yard last night!

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
This spring has been a good one for sheltering in place, hasn’t it? I’ve had so much fun in my backyard, especially after the northeast wind blows a bit the night before. All these late small weather fronts (one coming up on the weekend) should keep the birds down and make this spring the fun one that its already been. Lots of birds moving on the coast. Interestingly, when they hit our east-west coast, it seems like the small birds want to head straight north up the canyons and over Figueroa, while the hawks, etc. may be more content to use the coastline as a landmark and continue on following it. Wonder about the Swainson’s Hawks, where they eventually go from here?
Last night I finally got what I was looking for: a male Calliope Hummingbird in my big bottlebrush tree! I had 5 species of hummer, only lacking an identifiable adult male Allen’s, which was odd.
The grosbeaks and orioles (Bullock’s especially) have put on a good show, but I have few warblers and no Western Tanagers yet.
Happy spring!

Joan Lentz
Montecito