Date   

Santa Ynez Valley birds

Guy Tingos <guy.tingos@...>
 

A small group birded the Sedgwick Reserve (restricted access) today and tallied 77 species. Highlights included both species of eagles, White-tailed Kite, 8 species of warblers, Lewis’s Woodpecker, Tri-colored Blackbirds, and Sora. A late Fox Sparrow was seen yesterday.

Guy Tingos
Santa Barbara


Farren Road on April 18

Florence Sanchez
 

I walked the length of Farren Road this morning.  It was decptively quiet.  I say that because there was not a lot of activity anywhere, yet when I tallied up my species list, I found almost 40 species there this morning.  Most were common birds in singles or small numbers.

Highlights were:
White-tailed Kite
Phainopeplas-3
Ravens-2
Lark Sparrow-1
Roadrunner-1
Common Ground Dove-1
Ash-throated Flycatcher-1
Hooded Oriole-3
Bullock's Oriole-1, a fly-over male at the ranch at the end of the road.

I had at least 3 Red-tailed Hawks circling this morning along with a Red-shouldered Hawk and multiple Turkey Vultures.  Because of the number of Vultures, I didn't pay much attention to an interesting dark-phase hawk until it was well past me.  It might have been a dark-phase Swainson's, based on wing shape, but it was by then too far away to be sure.

There was a good-sized flock of swallows over the reservoir on the way back, but against the light, it was almost impossible to identify all of them.. Some were Cliff and I got at least one Violet-green in the group.

I found no blue Grosbeak or Lazuli Buntings this morning and suspect that if they come in at all here, they won't stay long.  there are no tall annual weeks this year (like mustard) that they seem to prefer for foraging.

No hummingbirds but Anna's.

Florence Sanchez



Least Bittern, LLC

Will Knowlton
 

I briefly had a Least Bittern in the reeds of the SE end of the lake where the Fulvous Whistling-Duck has been reported (I have not had luck with it today). It was observed directly below the willows located on north side of the SE arm of the lake. I’ll upload some terrible photos to eBird when I get home this evening.

Will Knowlton
San Luis Obispo, CA


Re: [EXTERNAL] Help for hummingbird ID........

Nick Lethaby
 

Wonder if it’s been feeding in eucs. There are a lot flowering right now, which is not normal.

I agree it’s a Calliope.

From: sbcobirding@... [mailto:sbcobirding@...] On Behalf Of peterschneekloth@... [sbcobirding]
Sent: Tuesday, April 17, 2018 7:32 PM
To: sbcobirding@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [sbcobirding] Help for hummingbird ID........





I have a few photo's of an unusual Hummingbird, not an out of range rarity or anything so exciting but I can't tell if it's a Calliope not fully developed or something else is going on here. Hybrid?? A few photo's, any feedback welcome.

Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/39721164770/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/39721164820/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/39721164900/in! /dateposted-public/<https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/39721164900/in/dateposted-public/>

<https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/39721164900/in/dateposted-public/>


<https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/39721164820/in/dateposted-public/>


Help for hummingbird ID........

Peter Schneekloth
 

I have a few photo's of an unusual Hummingbird, not an out of range rarity or anything so exciting but I can't tell if it's a Calliope not fully developed or something else is going on here. Hybrid?? A few photo's, any feedback welcome. 


Peter Schneekloth
Buellton








Re: Fulvous Whistling Duck, Lake Los Carneros, April 17

David Kisner
 

As of 4:30 the FWDu was at the far east end.


On Apr 17, 2018, at 13:36, Glenn Kincaid glenn@... [sbcobirding] <sbcobirding-noreply@...> wrote:

 

The Fulvous Whistling Duck was still present this morning at Lake Los Carneros. (Thanks to all who encouraged the bird to stay until my return)

Behavior was consistent with previous reports. When I arrived it was on the E end of the dam associating with Mallards. It flew over the fence and joined the Mallards grazing on the grass. When a woman arrived to feed the ducks the Mallards approached her, and the Fulvous Duck fled to the eastern end of the lake.

Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara


Nojoqi Park and Alisal Road

Florence Sanchez
 

I birded both locations this morning, arriving in the park at *:00 a.m., when it was a very chilly 46 degrees outside.  That didn't seem to bother the birds.  I was hit by a wave of song within the park form House Wrens, Warbling Vireos, Purple Finches, and Yellow Warblers. Walking through the Park to the Road, I had a singing Bullock's Oriole and 3 Purple Martins. 

I decided to continue up the road to the old washed-out spot. Even though the road is now open to traffic it is quite walkable.  Highlights on the walk were more Bullock's Orioles, all males (my conservative count was 10 along the road); 2 Hooded Orioles; more Warbling Vireos, House Wrens and Yellow Warblers; at least 3 singing Black-headed Grosbeaks; a Flock of Turkeys; Western Bluebirds; and singles of Ash-throated Flycatcher and Lazuli Bunting.  A few Violet Green Swallows were circling overhead. The only downside to the walk was the sun in my face all the way up the road, making it hard to see some of the birds.  Red-winged Blackbirds were stationed all along the fence on either side of the road and I was reminded how often we forget how beautiful some common birds are.

The highlight of the day though was an unexpected adult Peregrine Falcon that swooped over the field immediately adjacent to the Park, then flew over my head toward the hills behind the field on the other side of the road.  The bird was very white underneath and dark gray on the back.

I didn't find any Western Kingbirds on my walk, but I had one on the fence next to the farms on lower Alisal Road. 

I stopped to eat my lunch at Gaviota State Park.  It was pretty quiet, but I decided to walk around afterwards and I was glad I did.  An unexpected Hairy Woodpecker was calling from a tree behind a parked trailer; then flew directly over my head into trees on the other side of the road.  Then I checked out the swallows circling overhead (all Cliff) and found among them 2 White-throated Swifts and one Vaux's Swift, the first one I've seen this spring.

Florence Sanchez


Fulvous Whistling Duck, Lake Los Carneros, April 17

Glenn Kincaid
 

The Fulvous Whistling Duck was still present this morning at Lake Los Carneros. (Thanks to all who encouraged the bird to stay until my return)

Behavior was consistent with previous reports. When I arrived it was on the E end of the dam associating with Mallards. It flew over the fence and joined the Mallards grazing on the grass. When a woman arrived to feed the ducks the Mallards approached her, and the Fulvous Duck fled to the eastern end of the lake.

Glenn Kincaid
Santa Barbara


Calliope & Costa's males at UCSB

Thomas Turner <tomleeturner@...>
 

For those of you near campus: I just saw male Calliope, Costa’s, and Rufous Hummingbirds on the bottlebrush by the Physics Lawn (34.414424, -119.843581). There were Black-Chinned too, but only females (and some likely Allen’s).

Tom

Goleta


Waterthrush

David Kisner
 

Waterthrush still present this morning on Far East end of Bird Refuge.

David


Re: Romero Canyon today

Eric Culbertson <ebc101@...>
 

Hi Joan and all,

1 rufous-crowned sparrow was along Bella Vista early March 2017 just a little ways east of where you had today's bird. So they were there prior to the fire. Less than five hundred feet above this section of Bella Vista, from along the dirt road here 1-2 were often seen last fall during afternoon hikes.

Eric Culbertson 
Carpinteria 


On Apr 16, 2018, at 5:48 PM, Joan Lentz joanlentz@... [sbcobirding] <sbcobirding-noreply@...> wrote:

 

Hi All:  Marilyn Harding and I wanted to see what it looked like up Romero Canyon.  We drove up Romero Canyon Rd., turned east onto Bella Vista, and were able to park easily south of the creek crossing.  The damage from the debris flow is so much less than at the other watersheds, such as Cold Spring and San Ysidro.  Indeed, the creek bed has been scoured, widened, and much of the riparian vegetation on either side is gone, but there are not the degree of boulders and tree trunks that you see on the other watersheds.

The wind was beginning to pick up, and we got a late start, but there was a nice sprinkling of migrants, including a CASSIN’S VIREO.  The bird I was most excited to see was a RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW, calling and appearing very much on territory along the side of the road on that stretch of Bella Vista between the creek and east to the top of the hill.  I am sure this species is visible if one were to hike up the Romero trail (which is now closed), but I’d never seen one at this low an elevation or along Bella Vista.  Typically found along East Camino Cielo, I’m wondering if the Thomas fire has made them come to lower elevations.
Good birding,
Joan Lentz


Romero Canyon today

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:  Marilyn Harding and I wanted to see what it looked like up Romero Canyon.  We drove up Romero Canyon Rd., turned east onto Bella Vista, and were able to park easily south of the creek crossing.  The damage from the debris flow is so much less than at the other watersheds, such as Cold Spring and San Ysidro.  Indeed, the creek bed has been scoured, widened, and much of the riparian vegetation on either side is gone, but there are not the degree of boulders and tree trunks that you see on the other watersheds.
The wind was beginning to pick up, and we got a late start, but there was a nice sprinkling of migrants, including a CASSIN’S VIREO.  The bird I was most excited to see was a RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROW, calling and appearing very much on territory along the side of the road on that stretch of Bella Vista between the creek and east to the top of the hill.  I am sure this species is visible if one were to hike up the Romero trail (which is now closed), but I’d never seen one at this low an elevation or along Bella Vista.  Typically found along East Camino Cielo, I’m wondering if the Thomas fire has made them come to lower elevations.
Good birding,
Joan Lentz


Botanic Garden April 16

Florence Sanchez
 

Joan Lentz is so right--a north wind pins down migrants.  It was a great morning at the Botanic Garden:  47 species in three hours.  It was not very windy in the canyon, but the wind higher up was doing its job.

Best birds were two clusters of warblers: one on the oaks of the East Slope just below the Porter Trail, and the other in the tops of the oaks that parallel the Creek trail, which could be seen very well from the Pritchett Trail above.  Many were singing.

Some of the highlights include 4 Black-throated Gray Warblers, 2 Townsend's Warblers, 2 Hermit Warblers, 2 Nashville Warblers, and at least 6 Wilson's Warblers.  I also picked up my first Western Tanager of the spring and found a nice male Costa's Hummingbird on the Porter Trail.  Also in the oaks in the Island Section were a couple of calling Pine Siskins, which was a real surprise.

Absent were Hooded Orioles except for one calling from Tunnel Road above the Island Section.  Also, the dearth of Yellow Warblers continues.  I heard one well above the dam, so far up that it was probably not on Garden property.  Usually by now there would be at least 3 males staking out territory along the creek.

The Garden is in glorious bloom and worth a visit.

Florence Sanchez


Monday PM birds

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

 

I took a late lunch break and made a whistle stop tour of various Goleta wetlands looking for flocks of gulls and terns stacking up in the wind. There was basically no sign of this, with 8 Caspian Terns at Devereux being much lower than expected.

 

At GSD, there was a single Bonaparte’s Gull and a pair of BW Teal.

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA 93117

 

Office: 805 562 5106

Mobile: 805 284 6200

Email: nlethaby@...

 


Re: birding today Sunday and last week

Dave Compton
 

A little more information that might be relevant to whether this duck is wild (taken only from eBird, so other sources may have more information):

So far this year, the Goleta bird is the only reported Fulvous-Whistling Duck in eBird in Arizona or California. The nearest report of one in eBird in 2018 so far is from central Chihuahua. There may have been an incursion of the species northward back in August 2017, when a group of 5 birds showed up in the Phoenix area and several more were reported near Hermosillo in Sonora, northwestern Mexico. Maybe there were others out there, too, that didn't make it to eBird.

I don't know if this bird is wild or not, and I'm not on the CBRC, so don't have a vote on the matter. But for a species like this, other reports in the region at the time are as relevant as any other information. And, no, I'm not saying the lack of recent, nearby records proves anything. It's just more context that should be considered.

As a comparison with the December 2005 bird at the Goleta Sanitary District plant, that bird DID show up when others were being seen in California and Arizona. 

I will say that the Lake Los Carneros bird is a fancy-looking duck, and I enjoyed seeing it Saturday.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara 

On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 4:22 PM, Joan Lentz joanlentz@... [sbcobirding] <sbcobirding-noreply@...> wrote:
 

Hi All:
Just reporting that I eventually got myself over to see that gorgeous, wild Fulvous Whistling-Duck, looking a lot more untamed than the one I saw in ’06 at the Goleta Sewage Treatment Plant! It's still floating around amongst the reedy eastern inlet of Lake Los Carneros, accompanied from time to time by a nice male Blue-winged Teal.
Last week I was monitoring the hummingbirds at my bottlebrush tree here in my yard in Montecito, and they definitely stack up during the wind events (very obvious if you live below a north/south canyon as I do), and then, when the north winds die down, they move on. I have yet to see a Black-chinned or a Calliope, but plenty of Rufous. I was looking at the backs of the Rufous, and one individual definitely had a few scattered green feathers on its back, but not in a way that it could be confused with an Allen’s. I think the field guides can be misleading about this, when in reality, the green feathers on the back of an Allen’s are quite extensive in a way that this particular Rufous I observed did not have.
One last thing: a pair of Bewick’s Wrens has discovered my rubber wading boots, which are in an open paperbag on a table in my covered back porch. Constant humans going back & forth nearby in and out of my backdoor.. When I look in the boots, both are filled with nesting material, so I can’t tell if they are all the way back in the toe of the boot with the nest….or what? Will they persevere? Stay tuned!

Good birding,
Joan Lentz



singing Orchard Oriole

Larry Ballard
 

The Orchard Oriole that arrived in Carp in mid-October has been singing this week. The Northern Waterthrush is still at the bird refuge and the Little Blue Heron at Goleta Beach is getting bluish feathers on its back and scapulars.
Larry B.
Carpinteria 


birding today Sunday and last week

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
Just reporting that I eventually got myself over to see that gorgeous, wild Fulvous Whistling-Duck, looking a lot more untamed than the one I saw in ’06 at the Goleta Sewage Treatment Plant! It's still floating around amongst the reedy eastern inlet of Lake Los Carneros, accompanied from time to time by a nice male Blue-winged Teal.
Last week I was monitoring the hummingbirds at my bottlebrush tree here in my yard in Montecito, and they definitely stack up during the wind events (very obvious if you live below a north/south canyon as I do), and then, when the north winds die down, they move on. I have yet to see a Black-chinned or a Calliope, but plenty of Rufous. I was looking at the backs of the Rufous, and one individual definitely had a few scattered green feathers on its back, but not in a way that it could be confused with an Allen’s. I think the field guides can be misleading about this, when in reality, the green feathers on the back of an Allen’s are quite extensive in a way that this particular Rufous I observed did not have.
One last thing: a pair of Bewick’s Wrens has discovered my rubber wading boots, which are in an open paperbag on a table in my covered back porch. Constant humans going back & forth nearby in and out of my backdoor. When I look in the boots, both are filled with nesting material, so I can’t tell if they are all the way back in the toe of the boot with the nest….or what? Will they persevere? Stay tuned!

Good birding,
Joan Lentz


Double Dolphin Coastal Cruise

Julie Scotland
 

Not *officially* birding today but went out on the Double Dolphin for a few hours and saw probably 200+ cormorants migrating north, several red throated loons and misc. other loons doing the same. Possible group of 20+ Brants (too far to confirm but right shape/size).

Also great views of momma and baby grey whales.

It was a heck of a day at sea. :)

Julie Scotland
Santa Barbara





Sunday birds

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

I started off late morning by hiking up the Franklin Trail to just beyond Frank's Bench. After 40 minutes of watching, 3 imm Swainson's Hawk flew over followed shortly by a pale phase adult. Kudos to Eric Culbertson for discovering these raptor migration spots. Mt guess is that concerted observation would record a few hundred Swainson's Hawks in in spring here, which shows how much can be missed. I had 3 Phainopeplas and 2-3 Purple Finches along the trail as well.

I then checked out Area K. All three teal were present, including 8 Blue-winged.

A check around the bottlebrush trees in Winchester Canyon turned possibly the most Rufous of the spring and a single male Calliope and 2 Black-chinneds.

Nick


Fulvous Whistling-Duck present

Mark Holmgren
 

At the far E end of Lake Los Carneros at 2:40 pm. Also present: male Blue-winged Teal, singing Marsh Wren. Did not see a Sage Thrasher.

Mark Holmgren
Santa Barbara