Date   

[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Bufflehead (1 report)
- Common Ground Dove (1 report)
- Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (2 reports)
- White-eyed Vireo (3 reports)
- American Redstart (4 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola) (1)
- Reported May 30, 2020 08:36 by John Deacon
- Santa Maria Mesa Road Ponds, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.8837715,-120.279007&ll=34.8837715,-120.279007
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69843283
- Comments: "Photo to be added. Ongoing male."

Common Ground Dove (Columbina passerina) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 29, 2020 09:28 by David Blue
- Farren Rd., Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.443548,-119.9237752&ll=34.443548,-119.9237752
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69810201
- Comments: "Heard only. A low mournful “hooo-oop” repeated at about a one second interval. South of the palm tree on the first rise south of the gate."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported May 29, 2020 18:12 by George Chapman
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69819092
- Comments: "White eyeline, bordered by black, dark bill."

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1)
- Reported May 29, 2020 18:12 by James Chapman
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69822403
- Comments: "White eyeline, bordered by black, dark bill."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 29, 2020 09:45 by Thomas Turner
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69798835
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "Continuing. Singing."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 29, 2020 07:01 by Cameron Tescher
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69795908
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Seen north of the West Campus Faculty Housing north of West Campus Lane near the fork. Then slowly moved east towards the abandoned house. Very vocal with its raspy song and was able to see every once in a while where it had a yellow eyelash, yellow rump, and white eye. Photos."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 28, 2020 11:15 by ANDREA BRUCE
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69810561
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Good look for several minutes. Underparts white/gray with yellow tinge. Yellow sides and flank. Yellow stripe from upper beak (mandible) to eye, that had clear white iris. Two white wing bars. Singing loudly. Located about 75-100 yards directly north of Gazebo in Tierra de Fortuna Park at end of Fortuna Rd (34°24′47″ N 119°52′8″ W). Moved between tallest Euc 75 yards directly north of Gazebo to oaks about 100 yards n of Gazebo."

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 29, 2020 09:45 by Thomas Turner
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69798835
- Media: 1 Photo, 1 Audio
- Comments: "Immature male. Singing."

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 29, 2020 07:01 by Cameron Tescher
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69795908
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Lifer! First saw an hour ago on a graffitied oak tree at around 7:15 and then moved into the willows just west of the eucalyptus singing. Could not relocate it until an hour later where it was kept singing and ran into Nick where we found it on a eucalyptes on the opposite side of the park singing (probably 100 yards north). Photos."

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 28, 2020 07:33 by ANDREA BRUCE
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69810480
- Comments: "Sighted at entrance to Open Space from Camino Corto Rd, in the oaks immediately upon entering. Bright and obvious yellow markings on side, wing, and tail. Upper body seemed darker but not black, unlike gray of females. It did not vocalize during sighting."

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 28, 2020 07:33 by Mario Borunda
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69765768
- Comments: "Sighted at entrance to Open Space from Camino Corto Rd, in the oaks immediately upon entering. Bright and obvious yellow markings on side, wing, and tail. Upper body seemed darker but not black, unlike gray of females. It did not vocalize during sighting."

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A SY Valley note for those interested in Ravens

Cruz Phillips
 

We usually see ravens in the winter and into the spring.  Rarely in breeding season or summer, although they do show up on carcasses.     Last year, for the only time I know of, we had a pair of Ravens nest on the ranch.  I believe we are lower in elevation than they normally nest around here. They fleged 3 young and stayed well into the summer.  They did not return this year.

Cruz Phillips
Las Cruzitas Ranch
Santa Ynez, CA


White-eyed Vireo and American Redstart

Mario Borunda
 

On Thursday around noon we found the White-eyed Vireo at Camino Corto Open Space.  It was near the Tierra de Fortuna Park at the west end of Fortuna Rd.  There is a gazebo in the park and the bird was moving between a large eucalyptus approx 75 yards due north of it to a group of oaks another 20 yards further north.  It had a loud and clear song that I recorded with the video on my phone (but I can’t figure out how to upload it onto eBird, any suggestions would be appreciated). 

Additionally, we had an unusual sighting at the entrance to the Open Space from Camino Corto Rd.  The small bird (4-5 inches) had yellow markings on the side, wing, and tail, very much like an American Redstart.  I saw it from about 20 yards flitting among the oaks for short time (1-2 minutes).  I did not list it on eBird since I did not get a picture, nor did I hear it vocalize, but it is worth keeping an eye out if you are in the area. This bird has been seen on Friday (May 29) by several birders and identified as an American Redstart.
Mario Borunda
Carpinteria


Re: Goleta birds

Daniel Barica
 

We assume this to be an American Redstart, not a Painted Redstart?
Thank you for the distinction.

Daniel Barica,
Huntington Beach, CA

On Fri, May 29, 2020 at 11:29 AM Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...> wrote:
All,

This I checked out Coronado and then Camino Corto for migrants. At Camino Corto I quickly heard an unfamiliar song that I suspected to be a vagrant. I then ran into Cameron from Ventura who told me he thought he had seen a Redstart but hadn't gotten great looks. We soon got a visual on the bird and confirmed the identification. Both of us heard (and Cameron saw) the WE Vireo at different locations ranging all the way to West Campus Rd.

Between last night and this morning, I have located two Great Egret nests, one with very young chicks, along the west side of Devereux. I suspect these bird might be using old GBH nests.

There is decent array of summering shorebirds hanging out in the evenings at Devereux currently with LB Curlews, Whimbrels, Marbled Godwits, Greater Yellowlegs, Willet, Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers around most evenings.

At Area K today, I had 3 Short-billed Dowitchers. There were 2 WF Ibis as well. I am wondering if there is any chance they are attempting to nest this year, given how long birds have been hanging around.

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200
Work: 805 562 5106

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


Goleta birds

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

This I checked out Coronado and then Camino Corto for migrants. At Camino Corto I quickly heard an unfamiliar song that I suspected to be a vagrant. I then ran into Cameron from Ventura who told me he thought he had seen a Redstart but hadn't gotten great looks. We soon got a visual on the bird and confirmed the identification. Both of us heard (and Cameron saw) the WE Vireo at different locations ranging all the way to West Campus Rd.

Between last night and this morning, I have located two Great Egret nests, one with very young chicks, along the west side of Devereux. I suspect these bird might be using old GBH nests.

There is decent array of summering shorebirds hanging out in the evenings at Devereux currently with LB Curlews, Whimbrels, Marbled Godwits, Greater Yellowlegs, Willet, Black-bellied and Semipalmated Plovers around most evenings.

At Area K today, I had 3 Short-billed Dowitchers. There were 2 WF Ibis as well. I am wondering if there is any chance they are attempting to nest this year, given how long birds have been hanging around.

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200
Work: 805 562 5106

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


South Coast Ravens redux

Paul Lehman
 

Not to beat a dead horse on the status of Common Ravens along the South Coast of SBA, but a couple folks were mis-quoting what "Birds of Santa Barbara County" says--as they were quoting what the book says about the raven's status back in the 1990s, when they were indeed "casual" along the coast between Goleta and Gaviota, though no longer. Here is what I say in BOSB about its CURRENT South Coast status:

"The spread of ravens in Santa Barbara County was first hinted at by the increase in numbers and early nesting in the Carpinteria area discussed above. Along the South Coast, 1996 brought reports from Carpinteria Salt Marsh and Padaro Lane near Carpinteria, Summerland, “the Mesa” in Santa Barbara, and Farren Road in western Goleta. In 1997, the species was also seen at Montecito and Gaviota. In 1998, there were sightings from upper Mission Canyon, Santa Barbara, and in Goleta. And in 1999, 4 juveniles were noted at the San Marcos Foothills in Santa Barbara. Since 2000, additional records have accrued at an increasing rate, including single birds well out on the coastal plain at More Mesa, along South Patterson Avenue, and over Atascadero Creek, Goleta, on 16 March 2001, 23 September 2001, and 24 February 2002, respectively. Sightings over the foothill regions along the South Coast have since become routine, though reports from well out over the coastal plain, such as near the immediate coast in Goleta and Santa Barbara, continue to be very rare and high counts do not exceed 4 birds. The highest pre-1990s Santa Barbara CBC total was 14 individuals (29 December 1984), although almost all other counts were below 5 birds. Since the mid-1990s, the highest count total is 13 birds on 5 January 2002. (A total of 450 reported on the CBC in December 1968 is certainly in error.) An exceptional 48 individuals were reported above Carpinteria 13 May 2018."


It should also be said that the opposite Raven vs. Crow problem continues in the Cuyama Valley--where some folks report CROWS without any details from the Valley floor, where they are largely rare to very rare, but where Ravens, of course, are numerous.

--Paul Lehman


[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (1 report)
- White-eyed Vireo (1 report)
- Hermit Thrush (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (Nyctanassa violacea) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 28, 2020 17:35 by Ron Hirst
- Goleta Beach County Park (including east end of Goleta Slough), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4171771,-119.829812&ll=34.4171771,-119.829812
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69779277
- Comments: "Continuing bird eating crabs"

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 28, 2020 11:15 by Mario Borunda
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69768954
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Good look for several minutes. Underparts white/gray with yellow tinge. Yellow sides and flank. Yellow stripe from upper beak (mandible) to eye, that had clear white iris. Two white wing bars. Singing loudly (audio attached). Located about 75-100 yards directly north of Gazebo in Tierra de Fortuna Park at end of Fortuna Rd (34°24′47″ N 119°52′8″ W). Moved between tallest Euc 75 yards directly north of Gazebo to oaks about 100 yards n of Gazebo."

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 28, 2020 10:49 by Mark Holmgren
- Kinevan Rd., Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.5069163,-119.8225639&ll=34.5069163,-119.8225639
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69763851
- Comments: "Caroling about 100 m downstream of the upper new bridge."

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Singing redstart at Camino Corto Open Space

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

Imm male

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


NCOS this morning

Barbara Millett
 

A first-year Bonaparte’s Gull was a surprise at North Campus Open Space this morning. This is a new bird for me at this location. It flew in, landed, & foraged along the edge of the channel for about five minutes, and then flew out towards the ocean.

Two Snowy Plovers foraging on the sandbar in the south channel were a welcome sight.

A female Red-necked Phalarope continues on the sandbar in the south channel.

eBird checklist:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S69761448


Barb Millett
Santa Barbara


[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Black Scoter (1 report)
- Neotropic Cormorant (1 report)
- Black-throated Sparrow (3 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Black Scoter (Melanitta americana) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2020 10:33 by Jenny Slaughter
- Becher's bay, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=33.9869049,-120.0258295&ll=33.9869049,-120.0258295
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69680770
- Comments: "One individual observed swimming near the rocky shore. At Becher’s bay. All black duck with yellow bill."

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 27, 2020 10:54 by David Blue
- Lake Los Carneros Park, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.44322,-119.84975&ll=34.44322,-119.84975
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69731846
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Seen previously this month at this location by others. Noticeably smaller than the Double-crested Cormorant it was sitting beside, and with a longer tail. A white border set off the yellow throat pouch. (See submitted iPhone photos.)"

Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) (2)
- Reported May 27, 2020 10:06 by Ben Sanders
- 93252, Maricopa US-CA 34.86537, -119.47725, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.865366,-119.477253&ll=34.865366,-119.477253
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69726193
- Comments: "Known location"

Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) (2)
- Reported May 27, 2020 10:06 by Presley Riggs
- 93252, Maricopa US-CA 34.86537, -119.47725, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.865366,-119.477253&ll=34.865366,-119.477253
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69720084
- Comments: "Known location"

Black-throated Sparrow (Amphispiza bilineata) (2)
- Reported May 27, 2020 10:06 by Oscar Wilhelmy
- 93252, Maricopa US-CA 34.86537, -119.47725, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.865366,-119.477253&ll=34.865366,-119.477253
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69720083
- Comments: "Known location"

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Re: crows vs. ravens in Montecito

Ron Hirst
 

I rarely see a single Raven flying along the crest near upper Franceschi Park. I'm glad they aren't as common as around Lancaster/Mojave. I was there Sun/Mon and there seemed to be a couple 1000 Ravens in groups of 2 - 8 birds incl. 3 nests on telephone poles in the 6 miles between Calif. City and Galileo. I only saw a few crows. The differences, especially in tail shape, have become fairly easy to spot. The croaking calls of a Raven now seem easily discernible. Ron Hirst, SB


[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Masked Booby (2 reports)
- White-eyed Vireo (2 reports)
- Hermit Thrush (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra) (1)
- Reported May 26, 2020 13:23 by Jenny Slaughter
- Auto selected 34.29327, -119.66707, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.29327,-119.667073&ll=34.29327,-119.667073
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69680182
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Observed sitting on the surface while we were in transit back to Santa Barbara harbor from Santa Cruz Island. One individual. We stopped the boat to get better looks, this individual had faint brown streaking coloration on its back. Very pale, cream colored bill."

Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra) (1)
- Reported May 26, 2020 13:23 by Craig Murray
- Auto selected 34.29327, -119.66707, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.29327,-119.667073&ll=34.29327,-119.667073
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69680286
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Observed sitting on the surface while we were in transit back to Santa Barbara harbor from Santa Cruz Island. One individual."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 26, 2020 09:30 by Dika Golovatchoff
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69685279
- Comments: "Seen high up in dense oak canopy with naked eye - it moved too quickly to focus on it with camera or binocs. Looking from below most notable characteristic was yellow along side body. It was singing very loudly, which is why we were able to follow it from one location to another. The general area in which it was moving was along a path north of a red bridge found from the main path entering the open space at the end of Fortuna."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 26, 2020 08:40 by Tom Beland
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69691797
- Comments: "Continuing bird at Camino Corto Open Space, heard its song, in the Willows and Oak trees, white iris, pale yellow breast with greenish back."

Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 26, 2020 19:29 by Mark Holmgren
- Kinevan Ranch, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.506859,-119.82576&ll=34.506859,-119.82576
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69700397
- Comments: "At 8:09pm at 34.50701 -119.82747. Caroling from hills on S side of road"

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Hermit Thrush and Western Tanager singing on Kinevan

Mark Holmgren
 

This evening as dark descended not much was vocalizing.  But, a Western Tanager was singing upstream of the new, upstream bridge along Kinevan Rd.  The song was coming from Kinevan Ranch, which is private property. Downstream from here about 200m from the new, upstream bridge along Kinevan Rd. a Hermit Thrush was caroling faintly.  I heard about 8 songs.

Mark Holmgren
San Marcos Pass


Lompoc Least Terns and other observations

Florence Sanchez
 

I spent some time in Lompoc today, including ocean Beach Park where it was slightly foggy even at noon.  Still, I had good looks at several Least Terns, one of my favorites (like white swallows with short tails).  There were also 4 Caspian Terns present but no sign of the possible Forster's/Common Tern Nick mentioned from yesterday.  I failed to find any Phalaropes either.  The only shorebird hanging around was a basic-plumaged Black-bellied Plover.

This is a slow time of year for shorebirds, but I've found it can be interesting to see just what does stick around during the doldrums of late May-early June.

At the Santa Barbara Harbor last Saturday, I found no shorebirds except for a long basic-plumaged Black Bellied Plover.  There were no loons or grebes left in the yacht basin either.  But I spotted a large pale gull in the flock at the end of the Sandspit so walked out to check it.  It turned out to be a very worn first-year Glaucous-winged gull, and in the flock of Western Gulls, I also found 6 scruffy California Gulls, 1 scruffy Ring-billed Gull, and 4 Heerman's Gulls.  

At Devereux last Monday, I found 18 Semi-palmated Plovers on the mud flat.  In another spot, I had 2 Snowy Plovers and a Kildeer.  There were 3 Greater Yellowlegs working the shallow pond next to the road with the expected Black-necked Stilts.

Also on Monday, I found a pair of Cinnamon Teal in Area K--male and female resting together in the salicornia.

Birding is fun even on slow days.

Florence Sanchez


[eBird Alert] Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Neotropic Cormorant (1 report)
- White-eyed Vireo (5 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Santa Barbara County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in Santa Barbara County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN35915
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2020 12:00 by Robert Schafer
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69631216
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Orange facial skin comes to a point"

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2020 13:01 by George Chapman
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69645424
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "Yellow spectacles, white eye, vireo bill, wing bars. Calling distinctive "Chick-a-vireo-chick", among other things. First seen in cluster of 4 oaks 75ft SW of intersection of Camino Corto and Abrego Rd. Stayed here calling for about 20 min, then moved west into willows and cottonwoods between West Campus Lane and the UCSB equestrian site."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 25, 2020 11:41 by Richard Norton
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69641282
- Comments: "ID by sound. Seen poorly. Wing bars. Face not seen. Found near red bridge around 1:30"

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 24, 2020 10:30 by Bobby T
- Camino Corto Open Space and Del Sol Vernal Pool Preserve, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4145111,-119.8673469&ll=34.4145111,-119.8673469
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69619694
- Media: 2 Photos, 1 Audio
- Comments: "Continuing. Entered at Fortuna. Upperparts green gray with pale wingbars, yellow spectacles wrapped around forehead and white iris, yellow flanks contrasting pale white underparts. Photos and vocal."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported May 25, 2020 08:24 by Thomas Turner
- Devereux Slough, Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4136013,-119.8756027&ll=34.4136013,-119.8756027
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69618796
- Comments: "Continuing. Singing and seen. In the willows just off slough road, on the connector road to West Campus Point lane."

White-eyed Vireo (Vireo griseus) (1)
- Reported May 25, 2020 09:58 by Mark Holmgren
- East Devereux (temporary, under review), Santa Barbara, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.4146812,-119.8725235&ll=34.4146812,-119.8725235
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S69634833
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "Recording not solicited by playback. Singing from Cottonwood S of the horse corrals. Also heard on recording: California Towhee, Spotted Towhee, Hairy Woodpecker."

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Re: Raven vs. crow in Goleta

Jamie Chavez
 

From the perspective of an eBird reviewer, with few exceptions, almost all raven entries are submitted to eBird without a word describing what was seen. While it might be best to get a documentary photo for a bird that is in an unexpected location this is not always possible. It is obvious that most of the records in the SB coastal plain are erroneous either because the observer is not skilled in identifying ravens from crows or they don't understand the status and distribution of this species locally. I have heard the point made that because ravens are common along the coast in many places in southern CA visitors to the area may not appreciate what they are seeing so they don't think about adding details. I would make the argument that they may not be identifying this species correctly in the first place based on the numerous incorrect entries locally by names we've never heard of. If a picture is worth a thousand words, in the absence of a picture please use words. This will leave little doubt to a reviewer or other eBirders who are interested in locating interesting observations using the maps. It goes a long way that an observer bothers to describe a large corvid that is shaped differently and flies differently than a crow.


On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 2:23 PM John Sterling <jsterling@...> wrote:
keep in mind though that Ravens are greatly expanding their distribution and population in many areas of the state and that your situation will likely change sooner than later


John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

PO Box 1653
Woodland, CA 95776A

530 908-3836
jsterling@...
www.sterlingbirds.com

On May 25, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Florence Sanchez via groups.io <sanchezucsb11@...> wrote:

Just to add a quick note.  I bird Farren Road often.  Most of the time, the Ravens seen there are further up the road than the parking pullout at the top of the first hill as you come up from Calle Real and Rancho Embarcadero.

Occasionally, I have seen one or two go lower down from that first pullout but have never seen one of those cross the freeway or come close to it.

Otherwise, there is that apparent "no-Ravens' land" from Goleta to Summerland.  Within that stretch, they are very uncommon even near the foothills.  For example, at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden we have received only a couple of records of individual Ravens from qualified observers over the 10-12 years that we have been keeping a regularly updated Garden bird list.  

Therefore I agree--within that no-Ravens' land any reports of Ravens should be subject to scrutiny.

Florence Sanchez




On Monday, May 25, 2020, 01:29:54 PM PDT, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:


Good point Dave. I didn’t mean to overstate their abundance on the Gaviota Coast. The ravens I had over Refugio State Beach last week (which were calling) were the first I have ever had down that far. In my trips to Refugio, I have had ravens in:

1/57 (2%) of lists South of the 101
7/63 (11%) of lists in the first half mile of Refugio Road North of the freeway
10/42 (20%) of lists in the stretch of road between the 3rd creek crossing and where the switchbacks start

I think Farren Rd. is similar: there is a demarcation line on the hillside, with mostly crows at the ocean and mostly ravens in the hills.

On May 25, 2020, at 1:18 PM, Dave Compton <davcompton60@...> wrote:

Just one more comment here. Citing the most recent edition of Paul's book is always a good idea when trying to direct people away from being influenced by misimpressions from eBird. But while ravens may at one time have been "casual" on the coastal plain west of Goleta, I don't think that is accurate any more. Rare, or even uncommon, is probably now more accurate, now. Regardless, American Crow is still by far the expected Corvus sp. on the immediate coast from about Farren Rd west to Gaviota.

And of course in Santa Barbara and Goleta, the species is still casual on the coastal plain, given I've seen maybe two in many thousands of hours of birding here.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 1:03 PM Adam Searcy <serpophaga@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I’m glad Tom brought this up as this coastal Santa Barbara Crow/raven issue was on my mind just a couple of days ago. There are many many Common Raven records in eBird on the coastal slope and almost all of them are probably misidentified American Crows. Identification of crow/raven (thankfully we only have one crow species locally) is known to be a very common error in eBird checklists.

Paul Lehman’s book lists Common Raven’s status on the coastal slope between Santa Barbara and Gaviota as “strictly casual over the coastal plain in this area” and that has certainly been my experience locally: I’ve not yet seen a Common Raven away from the mid-elevations of the Santa Ynez Mountains (where Lehman calls it “very uncommon”).

Looking at eBird there are many many Common Raven reports on coastal checklists. There are very very few that have accompanying photographs (some mentioned by Tom already). Anyone birding on the coastal slope who sees a Common Raven should try to document the sighting with photos and/or recordings of vocalizations. If you think Common Ravens are common on the coast—consider this a challenge to obtain good documentation so that Paul can update his book!

(Also a plug for those who venture into the Ventura County mountains/Lockwood Valley and submit eBird daya.  The opposite ID issue occurs there, where we receive many reports of American Crows—anything with photos has inevitably turned out to be a misidentified Common Raven—so the challenge is to be the first person to photograph a montane crow in Ventura County). 

Adam Searcy
Santa Barbara, CA

On May 25, 2020, at 11:56, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:


A quick note about ravens vs. crows: if you think you are seeing ravens around coastal Goleta / Isla Vista, then I think you are wrong. I know that sounds snarky, but I only mention it because 1) I know most of us are interested in improving our skills, and 2) because it would be nice to have fewer errors in eBird. 

I live near Devereux Slough, and have birded this area really often since 2015. Also, I bike commute from there to UCSB — or I did, when I could go to work — and I am always listening. I have never heard a raven here, nor had a good look at a corvid that I thought was a raven. I checked all the eBird records in this area: though there are scattered reports of ravens, almost none of them are from the most experienced birders. Mark Holmgren reports one from Devereux in 1990, and one from the Goleta Sanitary District Plant in 2015. Dave Compton and Glen Kinkaid each reported ravens once at Lake Los Carneros in 2016, but neither birder has reported any South of there. I don’t see any records from Devereux/UCSB/Coronado/Goleta Beach/etc. from other really experienced birders who bird there a lot, like Rebecca Coulter or Nick Lethaby. I think ravens almost never venture down to the coast in this area, which is interesting. It also means if you think you are seeing them here, you might want to brush-up on raven vs. crow. (I assume the same is true in Santa Barbara. I don’t see coastal records from really experienced birders there either, but personally I don’t know Santa Barbara as well as Goleta.)

In contrast, they regularly come down to the coast as you go farther West. They come down pretty low at Farren Road (though maybe not all the way to the freeway?). Just slightly farther West (El Cap, Refugio), they definitely come all the way to the ocean regularly. I had some over Refugio State Park just the other day. 

I hope that is helpful and not annoying!

Tom Turner

Isla Vista




--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA


ravens near ocean btwn Gol & Gav

Don Tate
 

This year I've seen a raven at Lookout Pullout and seen (and heard one of) two from Calle Real just west of DP. And I *thought* I saw 3 over Devereaux Slu, but they neither croaked not fanned tails, so who knows. Often along Hwy 1 vicinity of Jalama Rd. Ravens get around. Vacuums need proof, ha ha.

Don Tate


Re: Raven vs. crow in Goleta

John Sterling
 

keep in mind though that Ravens are greatly expanding their distribution and population in many areas of the state and that your situation will likely change sooner than later


John Sterling
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

26 Palm Ave
Woodland, CA 95695

PO Box 1653
Woodland, CA 95776A

530 908-3836
jsterling@...
www.sterlingbirds.com

On May 25, 2020, at 1:53 PM, Florence Sanchez via groups.io <sanchezucsb11@...> wrote:

Just to add a quick note.  I bird Farren Road often.  Most of the time, the Ravens seen there are further up the road than the parking pullout at the top of the first hill as you come up from Calle Real and Rancho Embarcadero.

Occasionally, I have seen one or two go lower down from that first pullout but have never seen one of those cross the freeway or come close to it.

Otherwise, there is that apparent "no-Ravens' land" from Goleta to Summerland.  Within that stretch, they are very uncommon even near the foothills.  For example, at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden we have received only a couple of records of individual Ravens from qualified observers over the 10-12 years that we have been keeping a regularly updated Garden bird list.  

Therefore I agree--within that no-Ravens' land any reports of Ravens should be subject to scrutiny.

Florence Sanchez




On Monday, May 25, 2020, 01:29:54 PM PDT, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:


Good point Dave. I didn’t mean to overstate their abundance on the Gaviota Coast. The ravens I had over Refugio State Beach last week (which were calling) were the first I have ever had down that far. In my trips to Refugio, I have had ravens in:

1/57 (2%) of lists South of the 101
7/63 (11%) of lists in the first half mile of Refugio Road North of the freeway
10/42 (20%) of lists in the stretch of road between the 3rd creek crossing and where the switchbacks start

I think Farren Rd. is similar: there is a demarcation line on the hillside, with mostly crows at the ocean and mostly ravens in the hills.

On May 25, 2020, at 1:18 PM, Dave Compton <davcompton60@...> wrote:

Just one more comment here. Citing the most recent edition of Paul's book is always a good idea when trying to direct people away from being influenced by misimpressions from eBird. But while ravens may at one time have been "casual" on the coastal plain west of Goleta, I don't think that is accurate any more. Rare, or even uncommon, is probably now more accurate, now. Regardless, American Crow is still by far the expected Corvus sp. on the immediate coast from about Farren Rd west to Gaviota.

And of course in Santa Barbara and Goleta, the species is still casual on the coastal plain, given I've seen maybe two in many thousands of hours of birding here.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 1:03 PM Adam Searcy <serpophaga@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I’m glad Tom brought this up as this coastal Santa Barbara Crow/raven issue was on my mind just a couple of days ago. There are many many Common Raven records in eBird on the coastal slope and almost all of them are probably misidentified American Crows. Identification of crow/raven (thankfully we only have one crow species locally) is known to be a very common error in eBird checklists.

Paul Lehman’s book lists Common Raven’s status on the coastal slope between Santa Barbara and Gaviota as “strictly casual over the coastal plain in this area” and that has certainly been my experience locally: I’ve not yet seen a Common Raven away from the mid-elevations of the Santa Ynez Mountains (where Lehman calls it “very uncommon”).

Looking at eBird there are many many Common Raven reports on coastal checklists. There are very very few that have accompanying photographs (some mentioned by Tom already). Anyone birding on the coastal slope who sees a Common Raven should try to document the sighting with photos and/or recordings of vocalizations. If you think Common Ravens are common on the coast—consider this a challenge to obtain good documentation so that Paul can update his book!

(Also a plug for those who venture into the Ventura County mountains/Lockwood Valley and submit eBird daya.  The opposite ID issue occurs there, where we receive many reports of American Crows—anything with photos has inevitably turned out to be a misidentified Common Raven—so the challenge is to be the first person to photograph a montane crow in Ventura County). 

Adam Searcy
Santa Barbara, CA

On May 25, 2020, at 11:56, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:


A quick note about ravens vs. crows: if you think you are seeing ravens around coastal Goleta / Isla Vista, then I think you are wrong. I know that sounds snarky, but I only mention it because 1) I know most of us are interested in improving our skills, and 2) because it would be nice to have fewer errors in eBird. 

I live near Devereux Slough, and have birded this area really often since 2015. Also, I bike commute from there to UCSB — or I did, when I could go to work — and I am always listening. I have never heard a raven here, nor had a good look at a corvid that I thought was a raven. I checked all the eBird records in this area: though there are scattered reports of ravens, almost none of them are from the most experienced birders. Mark Holmgren reports one from Devereux in 1990, and one from the Goleta Sanitary District Plant in 2015. Dave Compton and Glen Kinkaid each reported ravens once at Lake Los Carneros in 2016, but neither birder has reported any South of there. I don’t see any records from Devereux/UCSB/Coronado/Goleta Beach/etc. from other really experienced birders who bird there a lot, like Rebecca Coulter or Nick Lethaby. I think ravens almost never venture down to the coast in this area, which is interesting. It also means if you think you are seeing them here, you might want to brush-up on raven vs. crow. (I assume the same is true in Santa Barbara. I don’t see coastal records from really experienced birders there either, but personally I don’t know Santa Barbara as well as Goleta.)

In contrast, they regularly come down to the coast as you go farther West. They come down pretty low at Farren Road (though maybe not all the way to the freeway?). Just slightly farther West (El Cap, Refugio), they definitely come all the way to the ocean regularly. I had some over Refugio State Park just the other day. 

I hope that is helpful and not annoying!

Tom Turner

Isla Vista



Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [sbcobirding] Raven vs. crow in Goleta

Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...>
 

All, 

While i agree that almost all these Goleta raven records are in error, this species is definitely on the rise. Although I did not ebird them, I had one fly over COPR this March and also heard one over Winchester Canyon this spring as well. These are my first ever locally.

It has now not become that unusual to see 1-2 along the 101 W of Goleta and along the 1to Lompoc, especially early on in the morning when both crows and ravens patrol the roads looking for carrion. However, American Crows remain far commoner.

Nick

On May 25, 2020 1:29 PM, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:
Good point Dave. I didn’t mean to overstate their abundance on the Gaviota Coast. The ravens I had over Refugio State Beach last week (which were calling) were the first I have ever had down that far. In my trips to Refugio, I have had ravens in:

1/57 (2%) of lists South of the 101
7/63 (11%) of lists in the first half mile of Refugio Road North of the freeway
10/42 (20%) of lists in the stretch of road between the 3rd creek crossing and where the switchbacks start

I think Farren Rd. is similar: there is a demarcation line on the hillside, with mostly crows at the ocean and mostly ravens in the hills.

On May 25, 2020, at 1:18 PM, Dave Compton <davcompton60@...> wrote:

Just one more comment here. Citing the most recent edition of Paul's book is always a good idea when trying to direct people away from being influenced by misimpressions from eBird. But while ravens may at one time have been "casual" on the coastal plain west of Goleta, I don't think that is accurate any more. Rare, or even uncommon, is probably now more accurate, now. Regardless, American Crow is still by far the expected Corvus sp. on the immediate coast from about Farren Rd west to Gaviota.

And of course in Santa Barbara and Goleta, the species is still casual on the coastal plain, given I've seen maybe two in many thousands of hours of birding here.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara

On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 1:03 PM Adam Searcy <serpophaga@...> wrote:
Hi all,

I’m glad Tom brought this up as this coastal Santa Barbara Crow/raven issue was on my mind just a couple of days ago. There are many many Common Raven records in eBird on the coastal slope and almost all of them are probably misidentified American Crows. Identification of crow/raven (thankfully we only have one crow species locally) is known to be a very common error in eBird checklists.

Paul Lehman’s book lists Common Raven’s status on the coastal slope between Santa Barbara and Gaviota as “strictly casual over the coastal plain in this area” and that has certainly been my experience locally: I’ve not yet seen a Common Raven away from the mid-elevations of the Santa Ynez Mountains (where Lehman calls it “very uncommon”).

Looking at eBird there are many many Common Raven reports on coastal checklists. There are very very few that have accompanying photographs (some mentioned by Tom already). Anyone birding on the coastal slope who sees a Common Raven should try to document the sighting with photos and/or recordings of vocalizations. If you think Common Ravens are common on the coast—consider this a challenge to obtain good documentation so that Paul can update his book!

(Also a plug for those who venture into the Ventura County mountains/Lockwood Valley and submit eBird daya.  The opposite ID issue occurs there, where we receive many reports of American Crows—anything with photos has inevitably turned out to be a misidentified Common Raven—so the challenge is to be the first person to photograph a montane crow in Ventura County). 

Adam Searcy
Santa Barbara, CA

On May 25, 2020, at 11:56, Thomas Turner <habarimbu@...> wrote:


A quick note about ravens vs. crows: if you think you are seeing ravens around coastal Goleta / Isla Vista, then I think you are wrong. I know that sounds snarky, but I only mention it because 1) I know most of us are interested in improving our skills, and 2) because it would be nice to have fewer errors in eBird. 

I live near Devereux Slough, and have birded this area really often since 2015. Also, I bike commute from there to UCSB — or I did, when I could go to work — and I am always listening. I have never heard a raven here, nor had a good look at a corvid that I thought was a raven. I checked all the eBird records in this area: though there are scattered reports of ravens, almost none of them are from the most experienced birders. Mark Holmgren reports one from Devereux in 1990, and one from the Goleta Sanitary District Plant in 2015. Dave Compton and Glen Kinkaid each reported ravens once at Lake Los Carneros in 2016, but neither birder has reported any South of there. I don’t see any records from Devereux/UCSB/Coronado/Goleta Beach/etc. from other really experienced birders who bird there a lot, like Rebecca Coulter or Nick Lethaby. I think ravens almost never venture down to the coast in this area, which is interesting. It also means if you think you are seeing them here, you might want to brush-up on raven vs. crow. (I assume the same is true in Santa Barbara. I don’t see coastal records from really experienced birders there either, but personally I don’t know Santa Barbara as well as Goleta.)

In contrast, they regularly come down to the coast as you go farther West. They come down pretty low at Farren Road (though maybe not all the way to the freeway?). Just slightly farther West (El Cap, Refugio), they definitely come all the way to the ocean regularly. I had some over Refugio State Park just the other day. 

I hope that is helpful and not annoying!

Tom Turner

Isla Vista


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


crows vs. ravens in Montecito

Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi all:
This is the kind of discussion that’s great to have on sbcobirding, thanks Tom.  It’s also the kind of information that gives eBird, or I should say SOME eBird users, a bad name.  And lastly, it makes those of us who’re more careful about status and distribution (read "old-timers") really grumpy.
As somebody mentioned, once you get to Carpinteria, and especially the bluffs near the seal haul-out where they used to nest regularly, you’re going to see Common Raven next to the coast.  And from there on east if you’re driving to Ventura, look up and you’re bound to spot a raven overhead as you drive that stretch of US 101.
In Montecito, since the coastal plain is so narrow, OCCASIONALLY, I’ve had a Common Raven away from the foothills (say, over my house once or twice).  Never on the beach.  The best place for them in Montecito is our eastern-most canyon — Romero.  That’s where I hear and see them most frequently.  And if you hike up San Ysidro and Cold Spring trails far enough, you get them in the foothills.  But they don’t like the coast here. And the Bird Refuge????
If you put Paul Lehman’s book on your phone, you can quickly look up this kind of thing in the field and avoid making embarrassing mistakes. Don’t be afraid to download Lehman’s book, available online here  http://www.sbcobirding.com/lehmanbosbc.html.
Thanks for listening to an “old timer”!


Joan Lentz
Montecito