Date   
Re: Pics of today's Red-eyed Vireo

Jim Long
 

Re: Red-eyed Vireo   Did anyone else miss where and when this bird was seen or was it just me.
Jim Long 
Santa Barbara

Virus-free. www.avast.com


On Sun, Oct 6, 2019 at 8:36 PM David Levasheff <levaweb@...> wrote:
Big thanks to Dave Compton for the find!

Pictures here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/levaweb/albums/72157711225132126

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David



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David Levasheff
Santa Barbara



Re: Pics of today's Red-eyed Vireo

Dave Compton
 

Hi Jim,

The vireo was found on private property in Goleta yesterday. I wish that it would've been possible to share this information with everyone. I apologize to anyone who feels excluded. But sometimes information just can't be shared.

Dave


On Mon, Oct 7, 2019 at 10:24 AM Jim Long <tagdesjim@...> wrote:
Re: Red-eyed Vireo   Did anyone else miss where and when this bird was seen or was it just me.
Jim Long 
Santa Barbara

Virus-free. www.avast.com

Big thanks to Dave Compton for the find!

Pictures here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/levaweb/albums/72157711225132126

--

David



--
David Levasheff
Santa Barbara



Lompoc 'rarity roundup'

Nick Lethaby
 

All,

 

On Sunday 8 of us got together various spots in the Lompoc/VAFB area to see how many rarities/interesting birds we might find. Unfortunately it turned out that it was more like Roundup had applied in a highly concentrated form to any rare birds present because we saw very little. Probably the best birds in public areas were a Black-and-white Warbler (Jamie Chavez) at Ocean Beach Park and a Baird’s Sandpiper (Wes Fritz) at the same location.

 

Highlights in non-public areas were a Swainson’s Hawk, a Blue Grosheak, 200+ American Goldfinches, a Wandering Tattler, and a Surfbird.

 

Nick Lethaby

Goleta, CA  93117

USA

 

Email: nlethaby@...

Office: +1 805 562 5106

Mobile: +1 805 284 6200

 


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Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Interesting dark buteo

John Callender
 

This isn't about a bird I saw (though I wish I had). But several different people reported an unusual dark buteo yesterday, or perhaps more than one of them, and I'd be interested in hearing opinions from people about whether these are the same or different birds, and what it or they are.

Marc Better posted an eBird list from the Bates Rd. bridge (Ventura County) hotspot yesterday that included photos of a bird identified as a Zone-tailed Hawk. See:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60402876

Thomas Turner posted an eBird list from Farren Rd. with photos of a similar bird, but identified it as a Broad-winged Hawk. See:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60402191

Marc's list covered the time from 9:10 a.m. until 12:25 p.m.; it's not clear to me when in that span of time he took his photos. Tom's list covers from 10:07 a.m. to 11:47 a.m.; again, I'm not sure when he took his photos of the hawk. A later eBird list from Mark Holmgren and William Kaempfer reported the same bird as Thomas's (but without photos) at Ferren Rd.; that list covered the period from 11:29 a.m. until 12:53 p.m. Their list can be seen here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60404409

It seems possible to me that the same bird could have managed to get on all three lists. And (again) at least to my inexperienced eye, the photos look very similar, and even after going through a few references and staring at the photos I'm not sure what's going on.

Thoughts?

John Callender
Carpinteria

Re: Interesting dark buteo

Steven Gaulin
 

Thanks to John Callender for his interesting comments. 
My opinion is that both birds were correctly identified by the original observers (Zone-tailed on Bates Road, and Broad-winged on Farren Road, both being juveniles of course). I can make out a yellow cere only the Bates Road bird. Only the Farren Road bird has dark primary tips and a light crescent in the wing linings at the base of the primaries. I see all of these observations as consistent with the original IDs.

Curious to know what others think.

Steven Gaulin
Santa Barbara


Wilson's Snipe at LLC

Betsy Mooney
 

I birded LLC Monday evening until dusk. A Wilson's Snipe flew in near the NE shore of the lake. It's a new bird for me. 
Checklist with photos:

Betsy Mooney
Santa Barbara/Goleta

Sedgwick Reserve (restricted access) - Green-tailed Towhee

Peter Schneekloth
 

The birding was still going on when I left so will share the entire list for the weekly survey once I have it. Wanted to share we stumbled on a new bird for the reserve today a Green-tailed Towhee.

A photo here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/55934026@N05/48871987056/in/dateposted-public/

For the Survey Crew
Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

Summer Tanager at LLC

Rebecca Coulter
 

Leading a group at Lake Los Carneros this morning turned up a calling Summer Tanager around the olive tree row near Stow House that leads toward the lake. Adult female or young male, with orangey mottling all over. It called "Pi-TUK" several times. We didn't get very clear looks before it flew toward the lake after a minute or two, but it did appear to forage some on the abundant olives, so it would be worth rechecking there.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Sedgwick Reserve (restricted access) - Weekly Survey

Peter Schneekloth
 

The weekly survey at Sedgwick Reserve ID'd 53 species plus an unidentified Accipiter and two distant swallows. Highlights were Green-tailed Towhee (as previously reported), Canyon Wren, Fox Sparrow and 5 Hermit Thrush. Yellow-rumped Warblers, Cedar Waxwings and other winter visitors continue to increase in numbers.

The full list here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60491108

For the Sedgwick Crew
Peter Schneekloth
Buellton

Re: Summer Tanager at LLC

John Callender
 

This morning around 7:30 I saw what I believe is probably the same bird in the same location. The bird I saw was mostly red overall with some lighter splotches; I'd be curious if anyone who saw the bird yesterday could weigh in on whether the photos in the eBird list below look like the same individual.

Also of note was a White-winged Dove that flew from the top of one of the large trees near Stow House around 9 a.m.; I last saw it flying east over the tops of the large eucalyptus trees on the east side of the lake. No photos of that bird, unfortunately.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60502690

John Callender
Carpinteria

Re: Summer Tanager at LLC

Rebecca Coulter
 

Almost certainly a different bird. The one we saw--though not all that well--was way more blotchy overall, not nearly as red. Cool!
Rebecca Coulter
SB

On Thu, Oct 10, 2019 at 11:24 AM John Callender <jbc@...> wrote:
This morning around 7:30 I saw what I believe is probably the same bird in the same location. The bird I saw was mostly red overall with some lighter splotches; I'd be curious if anyone who saw the bird yesterday could weigh in on whether the photos in the eBird list below look like the same individual.

Also of note was a White-winged Dove that flew from the top of one of the large trees near Stow House around 9 a.m.; I last saw it flying east over the tops of the large eucalyptus trees on the east side of the lake. No photos of that bird, unfortunately.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60502690

John Callender
Carpinteria

Re: Summer Tanager at LLC

Rebecca Coulter
 

I just received a couple of photos from one of the students in the birding class, and it does indeed look like it’s probably the same bird. The olive leaves lent a splotchy appearance to the bird, when it is actually pretty red all over. Thanks to the birders who have the patience to carry cameras as well as binoculars!

Rebecca Coulter 
SB

On Oct 10, 2019, at 12:05 PM, Rebecca Coulter via Groups.Io <rfcphoebe@...> wrote:


Almost certainly a different bird. The one we saw--though not all that well--was way more blotchy overall, not nearly as red. Cool!
Rebecca Coulter
SB

On Thu, Oct 10, 2019 at 11:24 AM John Callender <jbc@...> wrote:
This morning around 7:30 I saw what I believe is probably the same bird in the same location. The bird I saw was mostly red overall with some lighter splotches; I'd be curious if anyone who saw the bird yesterday could weigh in on whether the photos in the eBird list below look like the same individual.

Also of note was a White-winged Dove that flew from the top of one of the large trees near Stow House around 9 a.m.; I last saw it flying east over the tops of the large eucalyptus trees on the east side of the lake. No photos of that bird, unfortunately.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60502690

John Callender
Carpinteria

An odd gift of migration

Rebecca Coulter
 

Birders,
Once again I've had unusual evidence of migration at my doorstep. This time, not my doorstep per se, but at my feet. Walking alongside the Butterfly Pavilion at the Museum of Natural History this morning, I stubbed my toe on what I thought was a clump of leaves. It was the head of a Western Meadowlark, bright red blood still wet on one side. Unless this species winters nearby on the Mission lawn, which I've never seen before, it's pretty far out of its usual habitat. I looked around for the rest of the bird but couldn't find it. This odd discovery comes after two stories this week of finding this species in strange places: I almost hit one that was standing in the middle of Hwy 101 last week, and a colleague saw one standing in the gutter at the intersection of Alamar and State streets.

A slightly grisly gift but I was glad to get the chance to acknowledge its presence and hand over the specimen. With any luck, a resident Cooper's Hawk benefited from the rest of the bird.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Re: An odd gift of migration

Tom Miko
 

Okay this is strange, because I stepped out of my house in Claremont (Los Angeles County) late yesterday afternoon and was astounded to see a Western Meadowlark on the narrow strip of glass between my townhouse and the neighbor across the way.

Thomas Geza Miko
Claremont, LA County
909.241.3300
"Nobody knows what it is, which is what makes it cool." --The Industrial Design Guy

On Fri, Oct 11, 2019, 10:07 AM Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@...> wrote:
Birders,
Once again I've had unusual evidence of migration at my doorstep. This time, not my doorstep per se, but at my feet. Walking alongside the Butterfly Pavilion at the Museum of Natural History this morning, I stubbed my toe on what I thought was a clump of leaves. It was the head of a Western Meadowlark, bright red blood still wet on one side. Unless this species winters nearby on the Mission lawn, which I've never seen before, it's pretty far out of its usual habitat. I looked around for the rest of the bird but couldn't find it. This odd discovery comes after two stories this week of finding this species in strange places: I almost hit one that was standing in the middle of Hwy 101 last week, and a colleague saw one standing in the gutter at the intersection of Alamar and State streets.

A slightly grisly gift but I was glad to get the chance to acknowledge its presence and hand over the specimen. With any luck, a resident Cooper's Hawk benefited from the rest of the bird.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Black Skimmers

Larry Ballard
 

A flock of about 300 Black Skimmers has shown up a couple of times during the past week at East Beach near the base of Milpas St. The wind had them grounded yesterday afternoon and I was able to count 306. None seen there today.
Larry Ballard 
Carpinteria

Re: An odd gift of migration

Joel Barrett
 

I too had an out of place Meadowlark. It was over the ocean in the SB channel last week. Right around the middle of the channel. Not your typical habitat either, however they can be found on the islands. 
Joel Barrett 
Port Hueneme, Ca



On Oct 11, 2019, at 10:20 AM, Tom Miko <tgmiko@...> wrote:

Okay this is strange, because I stepped out of my house in Claremont (Los Angeles County) late yesterday afternoon and was astounded to see a Western Meadowlark on the narrow strip of glass between my townhouse and the neighbor across the way.

Thomas Geza Miko
Claremont, LA County
909.241.3300
"Nobody knows what it is, which is what makes it cool." --The Industrial Design Guy

On Fri, Oct 11, 2019, 10:07 AM Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@...> wrote:
Birders,
Once again I've had unusual evidence of migration at my doorstep. This time, not my doorstep per se, but at my feet. Walking alongside the Butterfly Pavilion at the Museum of Natural History this morning, I stubbed my toe on what I thought was a clump of leaves. It was the head of a Western Meadowlark, bright red blood still wet on one side. Unless this species winters nearby on the Mission lawn, which I've never seen before, it's pretty far out of its usual habitat. I looked around for the rest of the bird but couldn't find it. This odd discovery comes after two stories this week of finding this species in strange places: I almost hit one that was standing in the middle of Hwy 101 last week, and a colleague saw one standing in the gutter at the intersection of Alamar and State streets.

A slightly grisly gift but I was glad to get the chance to acknowledge its presence and hand over the specimen. With any luck, a resident Cooper's Hawk benefited from the rest of the bird.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Summer Tanager LLC

Betsy Mooney
 

The Summer Tanager observed at LLC by Rebecca Coulter and John Callender was still present this morning in the olive trees around 9:00 a.m. Beautiful bird!

My checklist with three photos: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60532188

Betsy Mooney
Santa Barbara/Goleta


birding at East Beach, Chase Palm Park, Cemetery, Butterfly

Joan Lentz <joanlentz@...>
 

Hi All:
Today Mark Holmgren & I got out for some birding here & there:  it was warm!  At East Beach Mission Creek outfall it was quiet, shorebird population way down.  Part of Larry Ballard’s flock of Black Skimmers came by, about 80 in all, then soon left being chased by a dog offleash….groan.  We crossed the street to new Chase Palm Park, where the sycamores & willows by Laguna Creek (?) offered up a BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, but that was about it.  Mark went over to the restoration plantings by the new desal plant which were really birdy last year, but nothing happening there today.
Then we went to the S.B. Cemetery, which was cool, shady, and Mark pulled out a TROPICAL KINGBIRD perched on the top of a small tree to the south of where we parked, near the first curve from the Cabrillo Blvd entrance, where the live oaks grow down that north slope.  We also had an Osprey perched on a cypress near the cliff edge portion of the cemetery.  
We then stopped at Butterfly x Hill Rd. intersection, where the sliver of ungroomed Music Academy property there held a beautiful adult male HERMIT WARBLER, also first spotted by Mark.  
If we’d gotten out a little earlier, we might’ve seen more…..so, there’s stuff still happening!

Joan Lentz
SB

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Joan Lentz
Santa Barbara

Refugio

Bradley Hacker
 

I made an AM visit to Refugio Canyon.
* The campground is still jammed with people and the back-dune pond extends underneath the bridge, meaning that the usual riparian habit is now a lake with Mallards and Coots. I had a quick look at the flock of uneasy looking gulls being chased around, and then left...too many people.
* The first creek crossing was more lively, but nothing special. There were a few sparrows and warblers, with the most "exciting" being a Nashville and Black-Throated Gray.
* The upper canyon has been neutron bombed (it would seem). In an hour and 1.9 km the only sparrows I saw were Juncos, and the only warblers one Yellow-Rump and one Townsends. A couple of lovely Hermit Thrushes were present in the upper, wet section of the creek below the fly horse ranch.

Brad Hacker, Goleta

--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums

Birders no longer welcome at Laguna Rd. (Ventura Co.)

Noah Arthur
 

Thanks to Steve Tucker for pointing out the sensitive access situation at the Laguna Rd. tams. The local residents obviously do not like birders walking along Laguna Rd, so in my opinion this location should be considered closed to birding, and should be marked as “restricted access” in eBird. 

In the past, situations where birders refused to stop visiting a road with tams when local landowners asked them to, resulted in the tams being cut down and the birds losing this important habitat. 

Noah Arthur (Oakland)