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migrants still hanging around!


Joan Lentz (cox.net address)
 

Hi All:
THIS IS NOT NORMAL!  I sat down to have a perfectly quiet, boring lunch and it’s 1 pm in the afternoon — and there they are again:  all these tanagers and Black-headed Grosbeaks.  They’re crowding into the little water feature in my yard — 5 or 6 at a time!  It’s crazy.  And then a MacGillivray’s comes along — I can count on one hand the number of sightings of that species in my yard.  So that was fun, but basically:  I can’t get rid of the Western Tanagers, singing in fragments ( from as far away as Manning Park) and the Black-headed Grosbeaks are just insane everywhere.
After reading Brad Hacker’s post — and then he wrote me and described his large yard in Western Goleta full of feeders and water and everything but largely devoid of migrants— and I’m thinking:  there’s gotta be something about the EASTERN coastal plain where the birds first find themselves.  IF the NE wind was blowing harder down Romero, and perhaps a bit reflected at La Cumbre, but for sure a contrast with further west, where there was no wind to speak of (e.g., Refugio), you wonder if these migrants in my yard were ones that chose not to go over these more windy, easterly canyons, and then perhaps would wait for tonight.
AND, it also seems, that the birds may be making a certain amount of progress moving from east to west during the day.  These birds “appear” to be moving through.  I’ll see if they’re still around tonight. But OFTEN I’ve found….no …. they’ve moved on.  I mean who ever heard of a good bird list at 1 pm on a sunny day?
What a year, huh?  There’s so much we still have to learn about bird migration! Thanks for listening. https://ebird.org/checklist/S67999603
Joan Lentz
Montecito


Florence Sanchez
 

Good for you Joan.  I sure don't have a theory about this particular movement of birds.  But sometimes it just seems to be a matter of timing, and I do believe wind is great influence on where birds do or don't turn up.

For example, I had a great morning on the Ennisbrook Trail last Friday after a very windy night.  I didn't even get there until 9:20 a.m. because I went somewhere else first.  People who went the next day found almost nothing.  

Hard to say why, but fun to enjoy when it happens!

Florence Sanchez


On Tuesday, April 28, 2020, 03:03:11 PM PDT, Joan Lentz (cox.net address) <joanlentz@...> wrote:


Hi All:
THIS IS NOT NORMAL!  I sat down to have a perfectly quiet, boring lunch and it’s 1 pm in the afternoon — and there they are again:  all these tanagers and Black-headed Grosbeaks.  They’re crowding into the little water feature in my yard — 5 or 6 at a time!  It’s crazy.  And then a MacGillivray’s comes along — I can count on one hand the number of sightings of that species in my yard.  So that was fun, but basically:  I can’t get rid of the Western Tanagers, singing in fragments ( from as far away as Manning Park) and the Black-headed Grosbeaks are just insane everywhere.
After reading Brad Hacker’s post — and then he wrote me and described his large yard in Western Goleta full of feeders and water and everything but largely devoid of migrants— and I’m thinking:  there’s gotta be something about the EASTERN coastal plain where the birds first find themselves.  IF the NE wind was blowing harder down Romero, and perhaps a bit reflected at La Cumbre, but for sure a contrast with further west, where there was no wind to speak of (e.g., Refugio), you wonder if these migrants in my yard were ones that chose not to go over these more windy, easterly canyons, and then perhaps would wait for tonight.
AND, it also seems, that the birds may be making a certain amount of progress moving from east to west during the day.  These birds “appear” to be moving through.  I’ll see if they’re still around tonight. But OFTEN I’ve found….no …. they’ve moved on.  I mean who ever heard of a good bird list at 1 pm on a sunny day?
What a year, huh?  There’s so much we still have to learn about bird migration! Thanks for listening. https://ebird.org/checklist/S67999603
Joan Lentz
Montecito


John Callender
 

My apologies for this late report; I was reminded by Joan that I should share more with the list since not everyone follows eBird.

Last Friday (April 24) I drove up to Romero Saddle at the east end of the currently open part of E. Camino Cielo. I was inspired to do so by Eric Culbertson's report of the big push of northbound migrants he saw on the eastern side of Romero Canyon the previous morning.

Between 6:30 and 9:00 a.m. at Romero Saddle, with clear conditions and a sometimes strong northerly wind, I had numerous waves of passerine migrants moving up the slope and over the pass. The peak time was 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. During that time the flow of birds was more or less continuous. Of the birds I was able to identify the most numerous were Yellow-rumped Warbler (35), followed by Lazuli Bunting (30) and Warbling Vireo (26). I also counted 355 unidentified small- to medium-sized migrants.

More details are in this list:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S67720299

John Callender
Carpinteria