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An odd gift of migration

Rebecca Coulter
 

Birders,
Once again I've had unusual evidence of migration at my doorstep. This time, not my doorstep per se, but at my feet. Walking alongside the Butterfly Pavilion at the Museum of Natural History this morning, I stubbed my toe on what I thought was a clump of leaves. It was the head of a Western Meadowlark, bright red blood still wet on one side. Unless this species winters nearby on the Mission lawn, which I've never seen before, it's pretty far out of its usual habitat. I looked around for the rest of the bird but couldn't find it. This odd discovery comes after two stories this week of finding this species in strange places: I almost hit one that was standing in the middle of Hwy 101 last week, and a colleague saw one standing in the gutter at the intersection of Alamar and State streets.

A slightly grisly gift but I was glad to get the chance to acknowledge its presence and hand over the specimen. With any luck, a resident Cooper's Hawk benefited from the rest of the bird.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Tom Miko
 

Okay this is strange, because I stepped out of my house in Claremont (Los Angeles County) late yesterday afternoon and was astounded to see a Western Meadowlark on the narrow strip of glass between my townhouse and the neighbor across the way.

Thomas Geza Miko
Claremont, LA County
909.241.3300
"Nobody knows what it is, which is what makes it cool." --The Industrial Design Guy

On Fri, Oct 11, 2019, 10:07 AM Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@...> wrote:
Birders,
Once again I've had unusual evidence of migration at my doorstep. This time, not my doorstep per se, but at my feet. Walking alongside the Butterfly Pavilion at the Museum of Natural History this morning, I stubbed my toe on what I thought was a clump of leaves. It was the head of a Western Meadowlark, bright red blood still wet on one side. Unless this species winters nearby on the Mission lawn, which I've never seen before, it's pretty far out of its usual habitat. I looked around for the rest of the bird but couldn't find it. This odd discovery comes after two stories this week of finding this species in strange places: I almost hit one that was standing in the middle of Hwy 101 last week, and a colleague saw one standing in the gutter at the intersection of Alamar and State streets.

A slightly grisly gift but I was glad to get the chance to acknowledge its presence and hand over the specimen. With any luck, a resident Cooper's Hawk benefited from the rest of the bird.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Joel Barrett
 

I too had an out of place Meadowlark. It was over the ocean in the SB channel last week. Right around the middle of the channel. Not your typical habitat either, however they can be found on the islands. 
Joel Barrett 
Port Hueneme, Ca



On Oct 11, 2019, at 10:20 AM, Tom Miko <tgmiko@...> wrote:

Okay this is strange, because I stepped out of my house in Claremont (Los Angeles County) late yesterday afternoon and was astounded to see a Western Meadowlark on the narrow strip of glass between my townhouse and the neighbor across the way.

Thomas Geza Miko
Claremont, LA County
909.241.3300
"Nobody knows what it is, which is what makes it cool." --The Industrial Design Guy

On Fri, Oct 11, 2019, 10:07 AM Rebecca Coulter <rfcphoebe@...> wrote:
Birders,
Once again I've had unusual evidence of migration at my doorstep. This time, not my doorstep per se, but at my feet. Walking alongside the Butterfly Pavilion at the Museum of Natural History this morning, I stubbed my toe on what I thought was a clump of leaves. It was the head of a Western Meadowlark, bright red blood still wet on one side. Unless this species winters nearby on the Mission lawn, which I've never seen before, it's pretty far out of its usual habitat. I looked around for the rest of the bird but couldn't find it. This odd discovery comes after two stories this week of finding this species in strange places: I almost hit one that was standing in the middle of Hwy 101 last week, and a colleague saw one standing in the gutter at the intersection of Alamar and State streets.

A slightly grisly gift but I was glad to get the chance to acknowledge its presence and hand over the specimen. With any luck, a resident Cooper's Hawk benefited from the rest of the bird.

Rebecca Coulter
SB

Kirill Shtengel
 

For what it's worth, together with another visiting birdwatcher we saw a Western Medowllark on Santa Cruz island last Sunday (10/6)