Brown Road Riparian Area-Guadalupe


John Deacon
 

All:

I birded what I call the Brown Road Riparian Area this morning.  It was very productive this morning.  I saw and/or heard 43 species.  Highlights included: Cassin's Vireo, Vaux's Swift, Black Headed Grosbeak (at least 9), Lazuli Bunting, Hermit Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, Black Throated Gray Warbler, Western Tanager and Ash Throated Flycatcher.  Checklist here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S107799695

This is the road that takes you to the Pt. Sal Trail.  I couldn't find the name of the creek that runs alongside the road but this is a really good spot and worth birding if you are up in the North County.

John Deacon
iseekbirds@...

--
John Deacon
Orcutt


Bradley Hacker
 

Corralitos Canyon according to the USGS, so maybe Corralitos Creek?

On 4/23/2022 12:18 PM, John Deacon via groups.io wrote:
All:

I birded what I call the Brown Road Riparian Area this morning.  It was very productive this morning.  I saw and/or heard 43 species.  Highlights included: Cassin's Vireo, Vaux's Swift, Black Headed Grosbeak (at least 9), Lazuli Bunting, Hermit Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, Black Throated Gray Warbler, Western Tanager and Ash Throated Flycatcher.  Checklist here:


This is the road that takes you to the Pt. Sal Trail.  I couldn't find the name of the creek that runs alongside the road but this is a really good spot and worth birding if you are up in the North County.

John Deacon

--
John Deacon
Orcutt

--
Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA 93117 USA
flickr bird photos
eBird bird photos
eBird data

--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums


Wim van Dam
 

The pretty detailed California Water Indicators Portal (CWIP) does not give a name for this creek, and instead refers to it as "Corralitos Canyon ". Further downstream the creek loses its anonymity as it merges into Orcutt Creek: https://indicators.ucdavis.edu/cwip/huc/180600080503

I cannot find any reference to "Corralitos Creek", so it might be best to describe it as "creek at Corralitos Canyon". 

Wim


On Sat, Apr 23, 2022 at 12:26 PM Bradley Hacker <bradley.r.hacker@...> wrote:
Corralitos Canyon according to the USGS, so maybe Corralitos Creek?

On 4/23/2022 12:18 PM, John Deacon via groups.io wrote:
All:

I birded what I call the Brown Road Riparian Area this morning.  It was very productive this morning.  I saw and/or heard 43 species.  Highlights included: Cassin's Vireo, Vaux's Swift, Black Headed Grosbeak (at least 9), Lazuli Bunting, Hermit Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, Black Throated Gray Warbler, Western Tanager and Ash Throated Flycatcher.  Checklist here:


This is the road that takes you to the Pt. Sal Trail.  I couldn't find the name of the creek that runs alongside the road but this is a really good spot and worth birding if you are up in the North County.

John Deacon

--
John Deacon
Orcutt

--
Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA 93117 USA
flickr bird photos
eBird bird photos
eBird data

--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #391: Island Scrub-Jay


Florence Sanchez
 

The Pt. Sal trail itself is also worth hiking this time of year, at least as far as the Vandenberg gate.  The riparian area at the bottom is well worth checking and hiking up the trail is good for raptors, Horned Larks, Lark Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow and Swallows.

Florence Sanchez


On Saturday, April 23, 2022, 02:55:19 PM PDT, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:


The pretty detailed California Water Indicators Portal (CWIP) does not give a name for this creek, and instead refers to it as "Corralitos Canyon ". Further downstream the creek loses its anonymity as it merges into Orcutt Creek: https://indicators.ucdavis.edu/cwip/huc/180600080503

I cannot find any reference to "Corralitos Creek", so it might be best to describe it as "creek at Corralitos Canyon". 

Wim


On Sat, Apr 23, 2022 at 12:26 PM Bradley Hacker <bradley.r.hacker@...> wrote:
Corralitos Canyon according to the USGS, so maybe Corralitos Creek?

On 4/23/2022 12:18 PM, John Deacon via groups.io wrote:
All:

I birded what I call the Brown Road Riparian Area this morning.  It was very productive this morning.  I saw and/or heard 43 species.  Highlights included: Cassin's Vireo, Vaux's Swift, Black Headed Grosbeak (at least 9), Lazuli Bunting, Hermit Warbler, Townsend's Warbler, Black Throated Gray Warbler, Western Tanager and Ash Throated Flycatcher.  Checklist here:


This is the road that takes you to the Pt. Sal Trail.  I couldn't find the name of the creek that runs alongside the road but this is a really good spot and worth birding if you are up in the North County.

John Deacon

--
John Deacon
Orcutt

--
Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA 93117 USA
flickr bird photos
eBird bird photos
eBird data

--
Good birding, 

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums


--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #391: Island Scrub-Jay


Wes Fritz
 

Hi all,

Maybe? we can just keep calling it the “ Brown Road Riparian Area” beings that is what we call it up here and it is a familiar name to us that bird it.

Good birding,

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

On Apr 23, 2022, at 2:55 PM, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:

anonymity


Jim Long
 

Hi All,

  As a retired, after 30 years  SB County Public Works; Surveyor, Roads Inspector, Flood Control Inspector and Resident Engr. I go by the SMVlyWatershed.pdf  which if you look at the map shows that the name in sepia or brown if you like, is Corralitos Canyon and the name in blue for creeks is Corralitas Canyon.   This is actually used on separate smaller tributaries throughout.  This means we would call it Corralitos Cyn. or Corralitos Cyn. Creek.  A reasonable  concept for us, but I guess that's why people think engineers are weird.

Jim Long  #398 Lesser Nighthawk
Santa barbara

On Sat, Apr 23, 2022 at 6:42 PM Wes Fritz via groups.io <wes-fritz=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,

Maybe? we can just keep calling it the “ Brown Road Riparian Area” beings that is what we call it up here and it is a familiar name to us that bird it.

Good birding,

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

> On Apr 23, 2022, at 2:55 PM, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:
>
> anonymity







Mark Bright
 

Hi Jim, 
 
Yeah I agree with you. I had already referred to that map you mentioned (attached below in reduced size). Being another retired County Planning GIS guy I always refer to that map right after a USGS topo.
 
Mark Bright
Santa Barbara
 


Mark Bright
 

Ah, it looks like that attached map became a poor resolution thumbnail and can't be read clearly.

Mark Bright
Santa Barbara


Wes Fritz
 



Hi all,

I can totally appreciate the correct name that is written on your maps. But, if you are birding the north county then you would know that this location is on Brown Road and is easy to find. But if you are not familiar with this area as we are, those who bird it. Then changing the name to the now, the kinda technical newly found name will make it difficult to find if you are searching the county for a creek bed that you bird it from Brown Road, standing on the road.
  I appreciate Wim’s curiosity and investing his time to track down the canyon/drainage that runs next to Brown Road. I’m sure that John’s Lat&long helped. I can appreciate Jim and Mark for verifying Wim’s research, thank you.
  If some how this turns into another ebird “Hot Spot” I pray that Wim names it “ The Brown Road Riparian Area” as it has been called this for better than 25 years. 

An example would be, if you were birding on Refugio Road and we all know this as birding Refugio Canyon. So, the creek that runs down it is Quiota Creek, so should we change this birding location’s name because there is a creek name written in blue?
  We all like to bird Kinevan Road, but again the blue writing says “San Jose Creek” so now do we change this name too?
  We also like to bird “ Coronado Street” and that is what we all call it, but the blue writing says Devereux Creek, so do we change the name when it is really called the “ Ellwood Forest Park” and the Coronado Butterfly Preserve, or should we just leave it alone and keep calling it what it has been called for 20+ years.

I hope to see you guys up there birding this riparian area that is on Brown Road.

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

On Apr 23, 2022, at 9:38 PM, James Long <tagdesjim@...> wrote:


Hi All,

  As a retired, after 30 years  SB County Public Works; Surveyor, Roads Inspector, Flood Control Inspector and Resident Engr. I go by the SMVlyWatershed.pdf  which if you look at the map shows that the name in sepia or brown if you like, is Corralitos Canyon and the name in blue for creeks is Corralitas Canyon.   This is actually used on separate smaller tributaries throughout.  This means we would call it Corralitos Cyn. or Corralitos Cyn. Creek.  A reasonable  concept for us, but I guess that's why people think engineers are weird.

Jim Long  #398 Lesser Nighthawk
Santa barbara

On Sat, Apr 23, 2022 at 6:42 PM Wes Fritz via groups.io <wes-fritz=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,

Maybe? we can just keep calling it the “ Brown Road Riparian Area” beings that is what we call it up here and it is a familiar name to us that bird it.

Good birding,

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

> On Apr 23, 2022, at 2:55 PM, Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:
>
> anonymity







Jamie Chavez
 

Wes makes some really good points about Hotspot naming that we don't often think about and this only points out the sometimes difficult and often under-appreciated task Wim has as the local volunteer eBird Hotspot editor. Regarding this Brown Road - Corralitos Canyon thing, Wes accurately refers to it as “The Brown Road Riparian Area” (which it is) but I have only ever known and referred to it as Corralitos Canyon (which it is). Either name as a birding spot predates eBird. The current name for this Hotspot is Brown Road at Corralitos Canyon but until recently it was misnamed Brown Road Pasture (which it is not) so it was renamed and moved to a much better spot along the road. Brown Road actually extends well to the east of Highway 1 into ag fields away from the canyon and any riparian habitat so just using the name Brown Road doesn't help someone find the spot. Birders can locate it via the map link on the Hotspot page, therefore, map marker placement is important. It is up to a Hotspot editor to determine at the time a location is suggested as a new Hotspot what the name should be. These names can change and can reflect current times - think Ocean Meadows Golf Course now NCOS. Hotspot naming can incorporate physical characteristics or be a colloquial name used by the birding community. There are no hard and fast rules and there are many examples of precise names or nicknames in eBird. Just as important as the descriptive name is determining the best location for a Hotspot map marker. What defines its boundaries? Where should the placement of the map marker be in relationship to the habitat or how birders currently use or are expected to use the Hotspot? What makes it a Hotspot in the first place? We should consider these things before clicking the "Suggest as a Hotspot" box which then sends the request to Wim.

There is a Hotspot Management Document produced by eBird that reviewers can refer to but I'm not sure that is public so I will refer to the eBird Help site instead which covers some of this:
https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48001009443-ebird-hotspot-faqs

It is my hope that someday eBird will permit Hotspot descriptions and comments, use of habitat photos, polygon mapping defining the boundaries, etc. so they are clearly defined and therefore more useful. Until then we can collect this information locally so we have a reference for how we use county Hotspots.

Jamie M. Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

------- Original Message -------
On Sunday, April 24th, 2022 at 12:35 AM, Wes Fritz via groups.io <wes-fritz@...> wrote:



Hi all,

I can totally appreciate the correct name that is written on your maps. But, if you are birding the north county then you would know that this location is on Brown Road and is easy to find. But if you are not familiar with this area as we are, those who bird it. Then changing the name to the now, the kinda technical newly found name will make it difficult to find if you are searching the county for a creek bed that you bird it from Brown Road, standing on the road.
  I appreciate Wim’s curiosity and investing his time to track down the canyon/drainage that runs next to Brown Road. I’m sure that John’s Lat&long helped. I can appreciate Jim and Mark for verifying Wim’s research, thank you.
  If some how this turns into another ebird “Hot Spot” I pray that Wim names it “ The Brown Road Riparian Area” as it has been called this for better than 25 years. 

An example would be, if you were birding on Refugio Road and we all know this as birding Refugio Canyon. So, the creek that runs down it is Quiota Creek, so should we change this birding location’s name because there is a creek name written in blue?
  We all like to bird Kinevan Road, but again the blue writing says “San Jose Creek” so now do we change this name too?
  We also like to bird “ Coronado Street” and that is what we all call it, but the blue writing says Devereux Creek, so do we change the name when it is really called the “ Ellwood Forest Park” and the Coronado Butterfly Preserve, or should we just leave it alone and keep calling it what it has been called for 20+ years.

I hope to see you guys up there birding this riparian area that is on Brown Road.

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

On Apr 23, 2022, at 9:38 PM, James Long <tagdesjim@...> wrote:


--
Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA