Topics

Gaviota & Refugio


Bradley Hacker
 

Same weather, arrival times and departure times, AM, both days.
Gaviota:
    Yesterday: RB Nuthatch, Chat, Hooded Oriole, Nashville Warbler, MacG Warbler + usual warblers (OCWa, CoYe, WiWa).
    Today: brief glimpse of the MacG, but otherwise dead.

Refugio:
    Yesterday: Northern Waterthrush, Tennessee Warbler, Virginia's Warbler + usual warblers.
    Today: dead.

Brad Hacker
Goleta
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/ <https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/>


--
Good birding,

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums


Wim van Dam
 

So Brad's observations bring up an interesting question about good vs bad days in fall migration. If on day X there are lots of migrants and on the next day X+1 these migrants are no longer seen, nor any other new migrants, what does that imply? I can think of two different explanations. 

1) The night was good for migration and the birds have moved on, but because of <some reason1> no new migrants appeared at the location.
2) The night was bad for migration and the day X birds are still around but are less visible because <some reason2> and no new migrants appeared.  

For <some reason 1> I can imagine some localized weather event that blocks migrants coming in from the north. 
For <some reason 2> I can imagine that newly arrived migrants are more actively looking for food, whereas birds that have rested for more than a day are less active and hence less visible. 

Does anyone know?

Related: The past week I have started recording the flight calls of night migrants over my Solvang house, and I'm seeing the usual warblers, sparrows, and thrushes. Some nights are much more busy than others. If somebody think that they can predict which nights are best for migration in Santa Ynez Valley, then I'll be happy to verify their theories. 

Wim  

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 4:10 PM Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:
Same weather, arrival times and departure times, AM, both days.
Gaviota:
     Yesterday: RB Nuthatch, Chat, Hooded Oriole, Nashville Warbler,
MacG Warbler + usual warblers (OCWa, CoYe, WiWa).
     Today: brief glimpse of the MacG, but otherwise dead.

Refugio:
     Yesterday: Northern Waterthrush, Tennessee Warbler, Virginia's
Warbler + usual warblers.
     Today: dead.

Brad Hacker
Goleta
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/>


--
Good birding,

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums






--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #387: Curlew Sandpiper


Linus Blomqvist
 

I had a look at the radar images of night-time bird migration from BirdCast. Not sure what to make of it, but if you compare the last two nights, there seems to be a difference. If you look carefully, by very early morning (4am) on the 22nd, there had developed an area of virtually no migration activity around Santa Barbara, after big movements earlier in the night. You can see it in the first picture. For a more detailed look, head to the BirdCast website and you can see the full timelapse (one image every 10 minutes during the whole night).

image.pngimage.png

In contrast, last night, the migration in our area seemed to continue later into the morning. Below is a picture from the same time (4am) as the first picture.

image.png

I don't know how much one can really conclude from this eyeballing exercise, but what I'm seeing would be consistent with a lot of movement two nights ago that ended early in the night around here, meaning, perhaps, that some birds got stuck here in the black hole that developed in the area. Then the following night (ie last night) there was movement all night, so birds moved on. (Still an open question why there wouldn't be new birds here coming in last night.)

One could probably think of other explanations that are consistent with the images. It's also possible that one simply cannot draw such conclusions from what are probably pretty coarse data, and I've only included a snapshot from one point in time. But the maps are fun to look at.

Linus
______________
Linus Blomqvist


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 4:40 PM Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:
So Brad's observations bring up an interesting question about good vs bad days in fall migration. If on day X there are lots of migrants and on the next day X+1 these migrants are no longer seen, nor any other new migrants, what does that imply? I can think of two different explanations. 

1) The night was good for migration and the birds have moved on, but because of <some reason1> no new migrants appeared at the location.
2) The night was bad for migration and the day X birds are still around but are less visible because <some reason2> and no new migrants appeared.  

For <some reason 1> I can imagine some localized weather event that blocks migrants coming in from the north. 
For <some reason 2> I can imagine that newly arrived migrants are more actively looking for food, whereas birds that have rested for more than a day are less active and hence less visible. 

Does anyone know?

Related: The past week I have started recording the flight calls of night migrants over my Solvang house, and I'm seeing the usual warblers, sparrows, and thrushes. Some nights are much more busy than others. If somebody think that they can predict which nights are best for migration in Santa Ynez Valley, then I'll be happy to verify their theories. 

Wim  

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 4:10 PM Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:
Same weather, arrival times and departure times, AM, both days.
Gaviota:
     Yesterday: RB Nuthatch, Chat, Hooded Oriole, Nashville Warbler,
MacG Warbler + usual warblers (OCWa, CoYe, WiWa).
     Today: brief glimpse of the MacG, but otherwise dead.

Refugio:
     Yesterday: Northern Waterthrush, Tennessee Warbler, Virginia's
Warbler + usual warblers.
     Today: dead.

Brad Hacker
Goleta
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/>


--
Good birding,

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums






--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #387: Curlew Sandpiper


Wes Fritz
 

Hi all,

This pretty interesting and a good topic.

Last night between 12:00am and 2:00am in the west end of Buellton and I could hear mostly Savannah Sparrows and Yellow Warblers flying over head. The night before I was out a little earlier but the sky was much more overcast than last night’s clear sky and I heard very few birds.
  This morning as I was birding the Los Alamos Sewage Works around 7:30 we had a surprisingly good number of western Warblers in the 2 oak trees where you can view the mud at the sewage facility. We moved over to Jack O’Connell Park where is was a little to foggy to see much but could hear a few birds flying by over head. ( no Golden Plovers) we then checked out the SMRE and it had very poor visibility, ( PLOVER AREA IS OPEN) but as we were leaving we checked out the sunny side of the willows at the kiosk and we had 5 Yellow Warblers in one Willow Tree a Wilson’s almost in the same tree, it was pretty birdy there. We then hit up SMSW on Black Road and the numbers of Western and Least Sandpipers were way up from a few days ago. Also the numbers of Long-billed Dowitchers were way up too. We saw 2 Baird’s and one Pectoral Sandpiper. The Savannah Sparrow numbers were way up at all of our stops today.
  I expected our south coast to be really good today.

Good birding.

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

On Sep 23, 2020, at 5:19 PM, Linus Blomqvist <linus.blomqvist@...> wrote:


I had a look at the radar images of night-time bird migration from BirdCast. Not sure what to make of it, but if you compare the last two nights, there seems to be a difference. If you look carefully, by very early morning (4am) on the 22nd, there had developed an area of virtually no migration activity around Santa Barbara, after big movements earlier in the night. You can see it in the first picture. For a more detailed look, head to the BirdCast website and you can see the full timelapse (one image every 10 minutes during the whole night).

<image.png>
<image.png>


In contrast, last night, the migration in our area seemed to continue later into the morning. Below is a picture from the same time (4am) as the first picture.

<image.png>


I don't know how much one can really conclude from this eyeballing exercise, but what I'm seeing would be consistent with a lot of movement two nights ago that ended early in the night around here, meaning, perhaps, that some birds got stuck here in the black hole that developed in the area. Then the following night (ie last night) there was movement all night, so birds moved on. (Still an open question why there wouldn't be new birds here coming in last night.)

One could probably think of other explanations that are consistent with the images. It's also possible that one simply cannot draw such conclusions from what are probably pretty coarse data, and I've only included a snapshot from one point in time. But the maps are fun to look at.

Linus
______________
Linus Blomqvist


On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 4:40 PM Wim van Dam <wim.van.dam@...> wrote:
So Brad's observations bring up an interesting question about good vs bad days in fall migration. If on day X there are lots of migrants and on the next day X+1 these migrants are no longer seen, nor any other new migrants, what does that imply? I can think of two different explanations. 

1) The night was good for migration and the birds have moved on, but because of <some reason1> no new migrants appeared at the location.
2) The night was bad for migration and the day X birds are still around but are less visible because <some reason2> and no new migrants appeared.  

For <some reason 1> I can imagine some localized weather event that blocks migrants coming in from the north. 
For <some reason 2> I can imagine that newly arrived migrants are more actively looking for food, whereas birds that have rested for more than a day are less active and hence less visible. 

Does anyone know?

Related: The past week I have started recording the flight calls of night migrants over my Solvang house, and I'm seeing the usual warblers, sparrows, and thrushes. Some nights are much more busy than others. If somebody think that they can predict which nights are best for migration in Santa Ynez Valley, then I'll be happy to verify their theories. 

Wim  

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 4:10 PM Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:
Same weather, arrival times and departure times, AM, both days.
Gaviota:
     Yesterday: RB Nuthatch, Chat, Hooded Oriole, Nashville Warbler,
MacG Warbler + usual warblers (OCWa, CoYe, WiWa).
     Today: brief glimpse of the MacG, but otherwise dead.

Refugio:
     Yesterday: Northern Waterthrush, Tennessee Warbler, Virginia's
Warbler + usual warblers.
     Today: dead.

Brad Hacker
Goleta
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/>


--
Good birding,

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums






--
Wim van Dam (Solvang, CA)
SBCO #387: Curlew Sandpiper


Mario Borunda
 

Hi all,
We arrived at Refugio just as Brad was leaving and stayed for the next couple of hours.  We saw the Northern Waterthrush, the Tennessee Warbler, and several of the usual warblers.  We did not see the Virginia's Warbler.  

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 4:10 PM Bradley Hacker <hacker@...> wrote:
Same weather, arrival times and departure times, AM, both days.
Gaviota:
     Yesterday: RB Nuthatch, Chat, Hooded Oriole, Nashville Warbler,
MacG Warbler + usual warblers (OCWa, CoYe, WiWa).
     Today: brief glimpse of the MacG, but otherwise dead.

Refugio:
     Yesterday: Northern Waterthrush, Tennessee Warbler, Virginia's
Warbler + usual warblers.
     Today: dead.

Brad Hacker
Goleta
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/
<https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/>


--
Good birding,

Bradley Hacker
Goleta CA
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bradley_hacker/albums