Topics

lerps


Jim Greaves <greaves@...>
 

Thanks Kimball, and Robb, for passing lerp information along to the lists -
raised the very serious issue of native v. non-native plants and their
associates!

I suppose it is too late to give back to 'pre-columbians' life-forms ANY of
the things that euro-asians have 'stolen' and/or altered. We certainly
would not give it back to the humans who preceded - so very unlikely to
happen with the things that merely get in the way of the greed of free
enterprise anarchists...

So, the question: what to do "about" lerps - keep them around so we can
enjoy the birds and "hope" things improve [like are doing with the
pines...], or lobby to have the air filled with anti-lerp venom - and the
accompanying known adverse impacts such aerial applications of poison have
on butterflies, moths, and other winged and unwinged non-avian creatures?

- Jim Greaves


Florence Sanchez <sanchez@...>
 

Aa few years ago, the long-horned borer was going to "wipe out all the
eucalyptus." But after the initial explosion, the population of this pest
receded dramatically, though it's still present. I suspect the same thing
will happen to the psyllid that is ceating the lerps. It will continue
to be present and will cause some damage, but the eucalyptus will survive,
for the most part. As we have seen, local organisms often step in to
assume the role of predators, given enough time.

A certified arborist recently gave me his perspective on this pest:
1. It does not in itself kill the tree (like the borer), but causes
severe defoliation. In mild to moderate cases, it is a natural pruning
and under optimal conditions, the trees will refoliate.

2. Its effects are far worse in drought conditions. A wet winter may
help many trees recover. Affected trees should be watered, if possible,
to help them recover (not possible in many cases, though).

3. Stressed trees that are severely infested may become vunverable to the
borer, which will kill the trees.

Florence Sanchez

On Wed, 22 Sep 1999, Jim Greaves wrote:

Thanks Kimball, and Robb, for passing lerp information along to the lists -
raised the very serious issue of native v. non-native plants and their
associates!

I suppose it is too late to give back to 'pre-columbians' life-forms ANY of
the things that euro-asians have 'stolen' and/or altered. We certainly
would not give it back to the humans who preceded - so very unlikely to
happen with the things that merely get in the way of the greed of free
enterprise anarchists...

So, the question: what to do "about" lerps - keep them around so we can
enjoy the birds and "hope" things improve [like are doing with the
pines...], or lobby to have the air filled with anti-lerp venom - and the
accompanying known adverse impacts such aerial applications of poison have
on butterflies, moths, and other winged and unwinged non-avian creatures?

- Jim Greaves


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