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More on Ocean Park Lesser Black-backed Gull


Nick Lethaby
 

All,

Since a number of folks still need this species, I wanted to provide a few more thoughts. First, this bird is not the same adult as the one that has intermittently appeared in several recent winters. That bird had dark markings on the bill and white flashes on the upperwing primary coverts, making it very distinctive. Therefore there is no reason to assume it will hang around all winter.

Gulls are notoriously hard to chase as they move around a lot. It probably makes sense to see if it starts showing on a more regular basis. The river mouth now has a number of sandbanks that offer roosting spots for gulls and terns, which show a strong preference for the sandbanks west of the railway tracks.  Note that birds will often roost mostly out of sight (from the area around the rail bridge) on the ocean side of the south sandspit. This is especially true at low tide. WIth the plover restrictions now lifted, you can walk out to check the beach and spit areas not visible from the rail bridge. However, note that this will also mean the birds are being disturbed more often.

Regards,

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA


Wes Fritz
 

Hi All,

Just a little more about this? Lesser Black-backer Gull. A adult LBBG was reported a few weeks ago in SLO CO along the beach kinda near Oso Flaco which is very close to the SMRE. As Nick mentions, some gulls move around a lot, so it is possible that it has been around for a month or so? We should also be aware that this gull may not be a coast hugger and can be found pretty much anywhere.
  Just to make this a little more messed up, a Slaty-backed Gull was photographed last week or so up north and a Little Gull has been hanging out at the Salton Sea for a couple weeks.

This might be a good year for vagrant gulls. Good birding.

Wes Fritz
805 895 0685
wes-fritz@...
Solvang CA

On Sep 24, 2020, at 10:55 PM, Nick Lethaby <nlethaby@...> wrote:


All,

Since a number of folks still need this species, I wanted to provide a few more thoughts. First, this bird is not the same adult as the one that has intermittently appeared in several recent winters. That bird had dark markings on the bill and white flashes on the upperwing primary coverts, making it very distinctive. Therefore there is no reason to assume it will hang around all winter.

Gulls are notoriously hard to chase as they move around a lot. It probably makes sense to see if it starts showing on a more regular basis. The river mouth now has a number of sandbanks that offer roosting spots for gulls and terns, which show a strong preference for the sandbanks west of the railway tracks.  Note that birds will often roost mostly out of sight (from the area around the rail bridge) on the ocean side of the south sandspit. This is especially true at low tide. WIth the plover restrictions now lifted, you can walk out to check the beach and spit areas not visible from the rail bridge. However, note that this will also mean the birds are being disturbed more often.

Regards,

--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200


--
Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA