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No Buff-breasted at COPR; UCSB Beaches this orning


Florence Sanchez
 

Several birders were out looking early this morning.  Nick and I walked west almost as far as the next point.  We found lots of flocks of common smaller shorebirds up in the wrack, but no Buff-breasted was among them.  We did turn up a juvenile Red Knot and a Dunlin in the mix.

When we started out, that particular beach was not socked in with fog so visibility was good until about the time I left.  I went to UCSB to check the Wrack-covered East-facing beach in spite of getting a report that the fog was too dense to see much there.  Though it was very foggy there, I was able to see birds pretty well once I got down on the beach,  I found lots of small shorebirds as I walked north to the point where the beach starts to curve east and the incoming tide was approaching the rocky points.  The most numerous were Least Sandpipers. Also present were Black Turnstones, Black-bellied Plovers, Semi-palmated Plovers, Kildeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Marbled Godwit, a few Western Sandpipers, and Sanderlings.  

I also had a bird I identified as a Dunlin, but afterwards that call gave me pause.   I have some suspicions about it being a Curlew Sandpiper, but that's only a thought.  The bird in general looked slender for a Dunlin as did the bill, which seemed more curved.  I had no reference material with me and no camera.  Checking reference when I got home, I realized a key point would have been to see whether or not the bird had a white rump when flying.  I did not do that.

Florence Sanchez


Santiago Lupi
 

I actually saw the Buff-breasted sandpiper this morning. James Chapman was on the bird when I saw it. Sadly, every birder was very far away and it soon flew off before I could tell anyone. I tried too alert others and find it again but I had no luck. The bird was near the rusty metal coming out of the beach by the dune pond trail. I bet it’s still around!
Good luck
Santiago Lupi, Goleta 

On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:40 AM Florence Sanchez via groups.io <sanchezucsb11=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Several birders were out looking early this morning.  Nick and I walked west almost as far as the next point.  We found lots of flocks of common smaller shorebirds up in the wrack, but no Buff-breasted was among them.  We did turn up a juvenile Red Knot and a Dunlin in the mix.

When we started out, that particular beach was not socked in with fog so visibility was good until about the time I left.  I went to UCSB to check the Wrack-covered East-facing beach in spite of getting a report that the fog was too dense to see much there.  Though it was very foggy there, I was able to see birds pretty well once I got down on the beach,  I found lots of small shorebirds as I walked north to the point where the beach starts to curve east and the incoming tide was approaching the rocky points.  The most numerous were Least Sandpipers. Also present were Black Turnstones, Black-bellied Plovers, Semi-palmated Plovers, Kildeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Marbled Godwit, a few Western Sandpipers, and Sanderlings.  

I also had a bird I identified as a Dunlin, but afterwards that call gave me pause.   I have some suspicions about it being a Curlew Sandpiper, but that's only a thought.  The bird in general looked slender for a Dunlin as did the bill, which seemed more curved.  I had no reference material with me and no camera.  Checking reference when I got home, I realized a key point would have been to see whether or not the bird had a white rump when flying.  I did not do that.

Florence Sanchez