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Recent birding


Dave Compton
 

Hi folks,

Apologies for not posting earlier, but yesterday I saw a probable Large-billed Savannah Sparrow at Ocean Park, along the plover exclusion fence west of the railroad bridge. Didn’t get really long look, but I’m fairly certain. So be on the lookout if you’re there.

There was an OK variety of shorebirds, overall, but nothing unusual. A couple of flyover flocks of dowitchers (about 45 total) gave only short-billed calls. That was the most numerous shorebird species. I looked over the 15 or so godwits carefully, and they were all the expected. 200-300 Elegant Terns gathered at the mouth, with expected gull species and Brown Pelicans. Afterward, I did a sea watch, and saw lots of birds, but almost all pelicans, gulls, and Elegant Terns. 

Today, I birded La Mesa Park and the bird refuge in Santa Barbara. Land migration is finally picking up. At La Mesa Park, I had a couple Western Tanagers, a couple of Wilsons’s Warblers, plus a Black-throated Gray, Yellow Warbler, and migrant Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. So consistent with the level of activity Peter  S. reported at Refugio, where I found things to be pretty dead on Saturday.  

I also saw an odd, drab warbler at La Mesa Park that I hesitate to describe because what I saw made no sense to me at all, and I clearly missed some important field marks. I CAN say it had some rather dull orangish yellow on the face and no wing bars. Also, a faint eye ring and medium length tail. It was just east of the footbridge, in eucalyptus at the edge of the lighthouse property.

Later, at the bird refuge, I saw 8 American Avocets. A few other common shorebird species were at the west end of the refuge. No sign of Yellow-crowned Night -Heron, Neotropic Cormorant, or Least Bittern. I checked the night herons and cormorants pretty carefully. Also, about 40 Northern Shovelers have shown up, which is not unexpected.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara 


Nick Lethaby
 

I was at SYRE yesterday and noticed that godwits, whimbrels, and curlews were coming into the river mouth towards dusk as they often do here and at Devereux. The good thing is that they are upstream of the railway bridge so you have good light to view them, unlike normal years when they are out on the sandbar. Hopefully something good will show up with them soon.


On Mon, Aug 31, 2020 at 2:24 PM Dave Compton <davcompton60@...> wrote:
Hi folks,

Apologies for not posting earlier, but yesterday I saw a probable Large-billed Savannah Sparrow at Ocean Park, along the plover exclusion fence west of the railroad bridge. Didn’t get really long look, but I’m fairly certain. So be on the lookout if you’re there.

There was an OK variety of shorebirds, overall, but nothing unusual. A couple of flyover flocks of dowitchers (about 45 total) gave only short-billed calls. That was the most numerous shorebird species. I looked over the 15 or so godwits carefully, and they were all the expected. 200-300 Elegant Terns gathered at the mouth, with expected gull species and Brown Pelicans. Afterward, I did a sea watch, and saw lots of birds, but almost all pelicans, gulls, and Elegant Terns. 

Today, I birded La Mesa Park and the bird refuge in Santa Barbara. Land migration is finally picking up. At La Mesa Park, I had a couple Western Tanagers, a couple of Wilsons’s Warblers, plus a Black-throated Gray, Yellow Warbler, and migrant Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. So consistent with the level of activity Peter  S. reported at Refugio, where I found things to be pretty dead on Saturday.  

I also saw an odd, drab warbler at La Mesa Park that I hesitate to describe because what I saw made no sense to me at all, and I clearly missed some important field marks. I CAN say it had some rather dull orangish yellow on the face and no wing bars. Also, a faint eye ring and medium length tail. It was just east of the footbridge, in eucalyptus at the edge of the lighthouse property.

Later, at the bird refuge, I saw 8 American Avocets. A few other common shorebird species were at the west end of the refuge. No sign of Yellow-crowned Night -Heron, Neotropic Cormorant, or Least Bittern. I checked the night herons and cormorants pretty carefully. Also, about 40 Northern Shovelers have shown up, which is not unexpected.

Dave Compton
Santa Barbara 



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Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA

Mobile: 805 284 6200


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Nick Lethaby
Goleta, CA