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White-winged Scoter yeaterday at Goleta Slough

Libby Patten
 

At Goleta Beach Park yesterday, saw the continuing make Greater Scaup resting on a shore bank on the north fork channel. Near it was a female-looking duck that was quite confusing to me. Later study of my photos led Hugh Ranson to identify it as a White-winged Scoter. John Callender and Joan Lentz also made helpful comments to help with this mystery. This bird looks good for a female WWSC: Brown body with white face patches and also white wing patch. Hope it’s not oiled or sick.
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Libby Patten
Santa Barbara

Florence Sanchez
 

This was a good find.  

I checked out the area this afternoon and found neither Greater Scaup nor White-winged Scoter.   I walked up the channel of Atascadero Creek all the way to the end of Ward Drive and back, paying special attention to the muddy banks as well as the channel.  I found a spot where I could climb down an iceplant covered slope and look under the 217 Bridge over San Jose Creek too.  The only thing in that channel was a Clark's Grebe, which has been hanging around there for some time.

I suspect both species have moved on, but updates would be appreciated.

Florence Sanchez. 

On Monday, May 18, 2020, 10:14:04 AM PDT, Libby Patten via groups.io <libby_patten@...> wrote:


At Goleta Beach Park yesterday, saw the continuing make Greater Scaup resting on a shore bank on the north fork channel. Near it was a female-looking duck that was quite confusing to me. Later study of my photos led Hugh Ranson to identify it as a White-winged Scoter. John Callender and Joan Lentz also made helpful comments to help with this mystery. This bird looks good for a female WWSC: Brown body with white face patches and also white wing patch. Hope it’s not oiled or sick.

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Libby Patten
Santa Barbara

Jamie Chavez
 

I'm not completely convinced this scoter is a White-winged. Maybe it is, but it would be nice to see some close-up photos. The best I could do was zoom in on the checklist image. If one were to use the Ken Kaufman Advanced Birding guide (the original, not the 2011 rewrite) he illustrates key differences in the head and bill shape between female Surf and White-winged Scoter. When I look closely at the head shape it seems to be more in line with that of a female Surf with a more sloped forehead and what looks like a more exposed bill at the base with a sharp vertical line compared to White-winged which shows a higher forehead and more feathering at the base of the bill.

Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

On Mon, May 18, 2020 at 4:35 PM Florence Sanchez via groups.io <sanchezucsb11=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
This was a good find.  

I checked out the area this afternoon and found neither Greater Scaup nor White-winged Scoter.   I walked up the channel of Atascadero Creek all the way to the end of Ward Drive and back, paying special attention to the muddy banks as well as the channel.  I found a spot where I could climb down an iceplant covered slope and look under the 217 Bridge over San Jose Creek too.  The only thing in that channel was a Clark's Grebe, which has been hanging around there for some time.

I suspect both species have moved on, but updates would be appreciated.

Florence Sanchez. 

On Monday, May 18, 2020, 10:14:04 AM PDT, Libby Patten via groups.io <libby_patten=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


At Goleta Beach Park yesterday, saw the continuing make Greater Scaup resting on a shore bank on the north fork channel. Near it was a female-looking duck that was quite confusing to me. Later study of my photos led Hugh Ranson to identify it as a White-winged Scoter. John Callender and Joan Lentz also made helpful comments to help with this mystery. This bird looks good for a female WWSC: Brown body with white face patches and also white wing patch. Hope it’s not oiled or sick.

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Libby Patten
Santa Barbara



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Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA

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Jamie Chavez
Santa Maria, CA